615 results match your criteria Annual Review Of Cell And Developmental Biology[Journal]


Non-Antibody-Secreting Functions of B Cells and Their Contribution to Autoimmune Disease.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2019 Mar 18. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA; email:

B cells play multiple important roles in the pathophysiology of autoimmune disease. Beyond producing pathogenic autoantibodies, B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells and producers of cytokines, including both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Here we review our current understanding of the non-antibody-secreting roles that B cells may play during development of autoimmunity, as learned primarily from reductionist preclinical models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062518DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Writing, Reading, and Translating the Clustered Protocadherin Cell Surface Recognition Code for Neural Circuit Assembly.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10;34:471-493

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University Medical School, and Zuckerman Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA; email:

The ability of neurites of individual neurons to distinguish between themselves and neurites from other neurons and to avoid self (self-avoidance) plays a key role in neural circuit assembly in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Similarly, when individual neurons of the same type project into receptive fields of the brain, they must avoid each other to maximize target coverage (tiling). Counterintuitively, these processes are driven by highly specific homophilic interactions between cell surface proteins that lead to neurite repulsion rather than adhesion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060701DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads
16.660 Impact Factor

Caveolae: Structure, Function, and Relationship to Disease.

Authors:
Robert G Parton

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10;34:111-136

Institute for Molecular Bioscience and Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4060, Australia; email:

The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is not a simple sheet of lipids and proteins but is differentiated into subdomains with crucial functions. Caveolae, small pits in the plasma membrane, are the most abundant surface subdomains of many mammalian cells. The cellular functions of caveolae have long remained obscure, but a new molecular understanding of caveola formation has led to insights into their workings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062737DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Mucins and Their Role in Shaping the Functions of Mucus Barriers.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 11;34:189-215. Epub 2018 May 11.

Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; email:

We review what is currently understood about how the structure of the primary solid component of mucus, the glycoprotein mucin, gives rise to the mechanical and biochemical properties of mucus that are required for it to perform its diverse physiological roles. Macroscale processes such as lubrication require mucus of a certain stiffness and spinnability, which are set by structural features of the mucin network, including the identity and density of cross-links and the degree of glycosylation. At the microscale, these same features affect the mechanical environment experienced by small particles and play a crucial role in establishing an interaction-based filter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062818DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Regulation of Division and Differentiation of Plant Stem Cells.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 22;34:289-310. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

Department of Biology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA; email:

A major challenge in developmental biology is unraveling the precise regulation of plant stem cell maintenance and the transition to a fully differentiated cell. In this review, we highlight major themes coordinating the acquisition of cell identity and subsequent differentiation in plants. Plant cells are immobile and establish position-dependent cell lineages that rely heavily on external cues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062459DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Kidney Nephron Determination.

Authors:
Leif Oxburgh

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 20;34:427-450. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

Center for Molecular Medicine, Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Scarborough, Maine 04074, USA; email:

The nephron is a multifunctional filtration device equipped with an array of sophisticated sensors. For appropriate physiological function in the human and mouse, nephrons must be stereotypically arrayed in large numbers, and this essential structural property that defines the kidney is determined during its fetal development. This review explores the process of nephron determination in the fetal kidney, providing an overview of the foundational literature in the field as well as exploring new developments in this dynamic research area. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060647DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Repertoires of tRNAs: The Couplers of Genomics and Proteomics.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 20;34:239-264. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, 76100 Israel; email:

The pool of transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules in cells allows the ribosome to decode genetic information. This repertoire of molecular decoders is positioned in the crossroad of the genome, the transcriptome, and the proteome. Omics and systems biology now allow scientists to explore the entire repertoire of tRNAs of many organisms, revealing basic exciting biology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062754DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Organelle Formation in Bacteria and Archaea.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 16;34:217-238. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; email:

Uncovering the mechanisms that underlie the biogenesis and maintenance of eukaryotic organelles is a vibrant and essential area of biological research. In comparison, little attention has been paid to the process of compartmentalization in bacteria and archaea. This lack of attention is in part due to the common misconception that organelles are a unique evolutionary invention of the "complex" eukaryotic cell and are absent from the "primitive" bacterial and archaeal cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060908DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Trafficking of Adhesion and Growth Factor Receptors and Their Effector Kinases.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 15;34:29-58. Epub 2018 Aug 15.

Cancer Research UK Edinburgh Centre, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XR, United Kingdom; email:

Cell adhesion to macromolecules in the microenvironment is essential for the development and maintenance of tissues, and its dysregulation can lead to a range of disease states, including inflammation, fibrosis, and cancer. The biomechanical and biochemical mechanisms that mediate cell adhesion rely on signaling by a range of effector proteins, including kinases and associated scaffolding proteins. The intracellular trafficking of these must be tightly controlled in space and time to enable effective cell adhesion and microenvironmental sensing and to integrate cell adhesion with, and compartmentalize it from, other cellular processes, such as gene transcription, protein degradation, and cell division. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062559DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Sortase A: A Model for Transpeptidation and Its Biological Applications.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 15;34:163-188. Epub 2018 Aug 15.

Program in Molecular and Cellular Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA; email:

Molecular biologists and chemists alike have long sought to modify proteins with substituents that cannot be installed by standard or even advanced genetic approaches. We here describe the use of transpeptidases to achieve these goals. Living systems encode a variety of transpeptidases and peptide ligases that allow for the enzyme-catalyzed formation of peptide bonds, and protein engineers have used directed evolution to enhance these enzymes for biological applications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062527DOI Listing
October 2018
8 Reads

Principles of Ubiquitin-Dependent Signaling.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 15;34:137-162. Epub 2018 Aug 15.

Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; email:

Ubiquitylation is an essential posttranslational modification that controls cell division, differentiation, and survival in all eukaryotes. By combining multiple E3 ligases (writers), ubiquitin-binding effectors (readers), and de-ubiquitylases (erasers) with functionally distinct ubiquitylation tags, the ubiquitin system constitutes a powerful signaling network that is employed in similar ways from yeast to humans. Here, we discuss conserved principles of ubiquitin-dependent signaling that illustrate how this posttranslational modification shapes intracellular signaling networks to establish robust development and homeostasis throughout the eukaryotic kingdom. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062802DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads
16.660 Impact Factor

Structures, Functions, and Dynamics of ESCRT-III/Vps4 Membrane Remodeling and Fission Complexes.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 10;34:85-109. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

Department of Biochemistry, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA; email:

The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) pathway mediates cellular membrane remodeling and fission reactions. The pathway comprises five core complexes: ALIX, ESCRT-I, ESCRT-II, ESCRT-III, and Vps4. These soluble complexes are typically recruited to target membranes by site-specific adaptors that bind one or both of the early-acting ESCRT factors: ALIX and ESCRT-I/ESCRT-II. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060600DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6241870PMC
October 2018
3 Reads

Symmetry Breaking in the Mammalian Embryo.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 10;34:405-426. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

European Molecular Biology Laboratory, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany; email:

We present an overview of symmetry breaking in early mammalian development as a continuous process from compaction to specification of the body axes. While earlier studies have focused on individual symmetry-breaking events, recent advances enable us to explore progressive symmetry breaking during early mammalian development. Although we primarily discuss embryonic development of the mouse, as it is the best-studied mammalian model system to date, we also highlight the shared and distinct aspects between different mammalian species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062616DOI Listing
October 2018
34 Reads

Cytoplasmic Mechanisms of Recognition and Defense of Microbial Nucleic Acids.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 10;34:357-379. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

Medical Research Institute, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China; email: ,

Microbial nucleic acids are major signatures of invading pathogens, and their recognition by various host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) represents the first step toward an efficient innate immune response to clear the pathogens. The nucleic acid-sensing PRRs are localized at the plasma membrane, the cytosol, and/or various cellular organelles. Sensing of nucleic acids and signaling by PRRs involve recruitment of distinct signaling components, and PRRs are intensively regulated by cellular organelle trafficking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062903DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Unconventional Ways to Live and Die: Cell Death and Survival in Development, Homeostasis, and Disease.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 8;34:311-332. Epub 2018 Aug 8.

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106, USA; email:

Balancing cell death and survival is essential for normal development and homeostasis and for preventing diseases, especially cancer. Conventional cell death pathways include apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death controlled by a well-defined biochemical pathway, and necrosis, the lysis of acutely injured cells. New types of regulated cell death include necroptosis, pyroptosis, ferroptosis, phagoptosis, and entosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060748DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Microglia and the Brain: Complementary Partners in Development and Disease.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 8;34:523-544. Epub 2018 Aug 8.

FM Kirby Neurobiology Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA; email:

An explosion of findings driven by powerful new technologies has expanded our understanding of microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS). This wave of discoveries has fueled a growing interest in the roles that these cells play in the development of the CNS and in the neuropathology of a diverse array of disorders. In this review, we discuss the crucial roles that microglia play in shaping the brain-from their influence on neurons and glia within the developing CNS to their roles in synaptic maturation and brain wiring-as well as some of the obstacles to overcome when assessing their contributions to normal brain development. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060509DOI Listing
October 2018
24 Reads

Specialized Intercellular Communications via Cytonemes and Nanotubes.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 3;34:59-84. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

Department of Molecular Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA; email:

In recent years, thin membrane protrusions such as cytonemes and tunneling nanotubes have emerged as a novel mechanism of intercellular communication. Protrusion-based cellular interactions allow for specific communication between participating cells and have a distinct spectrum of advantages compared to secretion- and diffusion-based intercellular communication. Identification of protrusion-based signaling in diverse systems suggests that this mechanism is a ubiquitous and prevailing means of communication employed by many cell types. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062932DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404750PMC
October 2018
2 Reads

Cytoplasmic Intermediate Filaments in Cell Biology.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 30;34:1-28. Epub 2018 Jul 30.

Institut Pasteur Paris, CNRS UMR 3691, Cell Polarity, Migration and Cancer Unit, Equipe Labellisée Ligue Contre le Cancer, Paris Cedex 15, France; email:

Intermediate filaments (IFs) are one of the three major elements of the cytoskeleton. Their stability, intrinsic mechanical properties, and cell type-specific expression patterns distinguish them from actin and microtubules. By providing mechanical support, IFs protect cells from external forces and participate in cell adhesion and tissue integrity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062534DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Heterochromatin: Guardian of the Genome.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 25;34:265-288. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; email:

Constitutive heterochromatin is a major component of the eukaryotic nucleus and is essential for the maintenance of genome stability. Highly concentrated at pericentromeric and telomeric domains, heterochromatin is riddled with repetitive sequences and has evolved specific ways to compartmentalize, silence, and repair repeats. The delicate balance between heterochromatin epigenetic maintenance and cellular processes such as mitosis and DNA repair and replication reveals a highly dynamic and plastic chromatin domain that can be perturbed by multiple mechanisms, with far-reaching consequences for genome integrity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062653DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System: Facing the Challenges from the Inside.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 25;34:495-521. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

Laboratory for Axon Growth and Regeneration, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), 53127 Bonn, Germany; email: ,

After an injury in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), lesioned axons fail to regenerate. This failure to regenerate contrasts with axons' remarkable potential to grow during embryonic development and after an injury in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Several intracellular mechanisms-including cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal transport and trafficking, signaling and transcription of regenerative programs, and epigenetic modifications-control axon regeneration. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062508DOI Listing
October 2018
9 Reads

Intercellular Spread of Protein Aggregates in Neurodegenerative Disease.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 25;34:545-568. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110, USA; email:

Most neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates, some of which are toxic to cells. Mounting evidence demonstrates that in several diseases, protein aggregates can pass from neuron to neuron along connected networks, although the role of this spreading phenomenon in disease pathogenesis is not completely understood. Here we briefly review the molecular and histopathological features of protein aggregation in neurodegenerative disease, we summarize the evidence for release of proteins from donor cells into the extracellular space, and we highlight some other mechanisms by which protein aggregates might be transmitted to recipient cells. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062636DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6350082PMC
October 2018
18 Reads

Assembly and Positioning of the Oocyte Meiotic Spindle.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 20;34:381-403. Epub 2018 Jul 20.

Department of Meiosis, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37077 Göttingen, Germany; email:

Fertilizable eggs develop from diploid precursor cells termed oocytes. Once every menstrual cycle, an oocyte matures into a fertilizable egg in the ovary. To this end, the oocyte eliminates half of its chromosomes into a small cell termed a polar body. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060553DOI Listing
October 2018
7 Reads

Regulation of Neuronal Differentiation, Function, and Plasticity by Alternative Splicing.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 20;34:451-469. Epub 2018 Jul 20.

Biozentrum, University of Basel, 4056 Basel, Switzerland; email:

Posttranscriptional mechanisms provide powerful means to expand the coding power of genomes. In nervous systems, alternative splicing has emerged as a fundamental mechanism not only for the diversification of protein isoforms but also for the spatiotemporal control of transcripts. Thus, alternative splicing programs play instructive roles in the development of neuronal cell type-specific properties, neuronal growth, self-recognition, synapse specification, and neuronal network function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062826DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Stellate Cells in Tissue Repair, Inflammation, and Cancer.

Authors:
Mara H Sherman

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2018 10 20;34:333-355. Epub 2018 Jul 20.

Department of Cell, Developmental & Cancer Biology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon 97201, USA; email:

Stellate cells are resident lipid-storing cells of the pancreas and liver that transdifferentiate to a myofibroblastic state in the context of tissue injury. Beyond having roles in tissue homeostasis, stellate cells are increasingly implicated in pathological fibrogenic and inflammatory programs that contribute to tissue fibrosis and that constitute a growth-permissive tumor microenvironment. Although the capacity of stellate cells for extracellular matrix production and remodeling has long been appreciated, recent research efforts have demonstrated diverse roles for stellate cells in regulation of epithelial cell fate, immune modulation, and tissue health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100617-062855DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Cell Sheet Morphogenesis: Dorsal Closure in Drosophila melanogaster as a Model System.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10;33:169-202

Physics Department, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708.

Dorsal closure is a key process during Drosophila morphogenesis that models cell sheet movements in chordates, including neural tube closure, palate formation, and wound healing. Closure occurs midway through embryogenesis and entails circumferential elongation of lateral epidermal cell sheets that close a dorsal hole filled with amnioserosa cells. Signaling pathways regulate the function of cellular structures and processes, including Actomyosin and microtubule cytoskeletons, cell-cell/cell-matrix adhesion complexes, and endocytosis/vesicle trafficking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-111315-125357DOI Listing
October 2017
8 Reads

Mechanisms of Tail-Anchored Membrane Protein Targeting and Insertion.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10;33:417-438

Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125; email: , ,

Proper localization of membrane proteins is essential for the function of biological membranes and for the establishment of organelle identity within a cell. Molecular machineries that mediate membrane protein biogenesis need to not only achieve a high degree of efficiency and accuracy, but also prevent off-pathway aggregation events that can be detrimental to cells. The posttranslational targeting of tail-anchored proteins (TAs) provides tractable model systems to probe these fundamental issues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060839DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343671PMC
October 2017
9 Reads

Coping with Protein Quality Control Failure.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10;33:439-465

MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge CB2 0QH, United Kingdom; email:

Cells and organisms have evolved numerous mechanisms to cope with and to adapt to unexpected challenges and harsh conditions. Proteins are essential to perform the vast majority of cellular and organismal functions. To maintain a healthy proteome, cells rely on a network of factors and pathways collectively known as protein quality control (PQC) systems, which not only ensure that newly synthesized proteins reach a functional conformation but also are essential for surveillance, prevention, and rescue of protein defects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-111315-125334DOI Listing
October 2017
18 Reads

Temporal Patterning in the Drosophila CNS.

Authors:
Chris Q Doe

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10;33:219-240

Institute of Neuroscience, Institute of Molecular Biology, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403; email:

A small pool of neural progenitors generates the vast diversity of cell types in the CNS. Spatial patterning specifies progenitor identity, followed by temporal patterning within progenitor lineages to expand neural diversity. Recent work has shown that in Drosophila, all neural progenitors (neuroblasts) sequentially express temporal transcription factors (TTFs) that generate molecular and cellular diversity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-111315-125210DOI Listing
October 2017
36 Reads

Proteostatic Tactics in the Strategy of Sterol Regulation.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10;33:467-489

Section of Cell and Developmental Biology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093; email:

In eukaryotes, the synthesis and uptake of sterols undergo stringent multivalent regulation. Both individual enzymes and transcriptional networks are controlled to meet changing needs of the many sterol pathway products. Regulation is tailored by evolution to match regulatory constraints, which can be very different in distinct species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-111315-125036DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6037418PMC
October 2017
34 Reads

Assessing the Contributions of Motor Enzymes and Microtubule Dynamics to Mitotic Chromosome Motions.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10;33:1-22

Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0347; email:

During my graduate work with Keith Porter, I became fascinated by the mitotic spindle, an interest that has motivated much of my scientific work ever since. I began spindle studies by using electron microscopes, instruments that have made significant contributions to our understanding of spindle organization. Such instruments have helped to elucidate the distributions of spindle microtubules, the interactions among them, their molecular polarity, and their associations with both kinetochores and spindle poles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060827DOI Listing
October 2017
8 Reads

Sex and Gender Differences in the Outcomes of Vaccination over the Life Course.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10;33:577-599

W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205; email: ,

Both sex (i.e., biological differences) and gender (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060718DOI Listing
October 2017
8 Reads

Introduction: The Challenge to Science in the Arena of Public Policy.

Authors:
Randy Schekman

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10;33:v-vii

Berkeley, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cb-33-092017-100001DOI Listing
October 2017
6 Reads

Centriole Biogenesis: From Identifying the Characters to Understanding the Plot.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 16;33:23-49. Epub 2017 Aug 16.

Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), CH-1015, Lausanne, Switzerland; email:

The centriole is a beautiful microtubule-based organelle that is critical for the proper execution of many fundamental cellular processes, including polarity, motility, and division. Centriole biogenesis, the making of this miniature architectural wonder, has emerged as an exemplary model to dissect the mechanisms governing the assembly of a eukaryotic organelle. Centriole biogenesis relies on a set of core proteins whose contributions to the assembly process have begun to be elucidated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060454DOI Listing
October 2017
7 Reads

How Single-Cell Genomics Is Changing Evolutionary and Developmental Biology.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 16;33:537-553. Epub 2017 Aug 16.

Developmental Biology Unit, EMBL, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany; email:

The recent flood of single-cell data not only boosts our knowledge of cells and cell types, but also provides new insight into development and evolution from a cellular perspective. For example, assaying the genomes of multiple cells during development reveals developmental lineage trees-the kinship lineage-whereas cellular transcriptomes inform us about the regulatory state of cells and their gradual restriction in potency-the Waddington lineage. Beyond that, the comparison of single-cell data across species allows evolutionary changes to be tracked at all stages of development from the zygote, via different kinds of stem cells, to the differentiating cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060818DOI Listing
October 2017
10 Reads

Lessons from Interspecies Mammalian Chimeras.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 14;33:203-217. Epub 2017 Aug 14.

Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305; email:

As chimeras transform from beasts of Greek mythology into tools of contemporary bioscience, secrets of developmental biology and evolutionary divergence are being revealed. Recent advances in stem cell biology and interspecies chimerism have generated new models with extensive basic and translational applications, including generation of transplantable, patient-specific organs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060654DOI Listing
October 2017
11 Reads

The Inherent Asymmetry of DNA Replication.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 11;33:291-318. Epub 2017 Aug 11.

Department of Biology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218; email: , ,

Semiconservative DNA replication has provided an elegant solution to the fundamental problem of how life is able to proliferate in a way that allows cells, organisms, and populations to survive and replicate many times over. Somewhat lost, however, in our admiration for this mechanism is an appreciation for the asymmetries that occur in the process of DNA replication. As we discuss in this review, these asymmetries arise as a consequence of the structure of the DNA molecule and the enzymatic mechanism of DNA synthesis. Read More

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http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060447DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5695668PMC
October 2017
23 Reads

Lipid Droplet Biogenesis.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 9;33:491-510. Epub 2017 Aug 9.

Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115; email: ,

Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles that store neutral lipids for energy or membrane synthesis and act as hubs for metabolic processes. Cells generate LDs de novo, converting cells to emulsions with LDs constituting the dispersed oil phase in the aqueous cytoplasm. Here we review our current view of LD biogenesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060608DOI Listing
October 2017
33 Reads

Excitable Signal Transduction Networks in Directed Cell Migration.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 9;33:103-125. Epub 2017 Aug 9.

Department of Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205; email:

Although directed migration of eukaryotic cells may have evolved to escape nutrient depletion, it has been adopted for an extensive range of physiological events during development and in the adult organism. The subversion of these movements results in disease, such as cancer. Mechanisms of propulsion and sensing are extremely diverse, but most eukaryotic cells move by extending actin-filled protrusions termed macropinosomes, pseudopodia, or lamellipodia or by extension of blebs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060739DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5792054PMC
October 2017
7 Reads

The Three-Dimensional Organization of Mammalian Genomes.

Authors:
Miao Yu Bing Ren

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 7;33:265-289. Epub 2017 Aug 7.

Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, La Jolla, California 92093; email:

Animal development depends on not only the linear genome sequence that embeds millions of cis-regulatory elements, but also the three-dimensional (3D) chromatin architecture that orchestrates the interplay between cis-regulatory elements and their target genes. Compared to our knowledge of the cis-regulatory sequences, the understanding of the 3D genome organization in human and other eukaryotes is still limited. Recent advances in technologies to map the 3D genome architecture have greatly accelerated the pace of discovery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060531DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5837811PMC
October 2017
13 Reads

Cell Polarity in Yeast.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 7;33:77-101. Epub 2017 Aug 7.

Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710; email:

A conserved molecular machinery centered on the Cdc42 GTPase regulates cell polarity in diverse organisms. Here we review findings from budding and fission yeasts that reveal both a conserved core polarity circuit and several adaptations that each organism exploits to fulfill the needs of its lifestyle. The core circuit involves positive feedback by local activation of Cdc42 to generate a cluster of concentrated GTP-Cdc42 at the membrane. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060856DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5944360PMC
October 2017
35 Reads

In Search of Lost Small Peptides.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 31;33:391-416. Epub 2017 Jul 31.

Centre de Biologie du Développement, Centre de Biologie Intégrative, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse, France; email:

A large body of evidence indicates that genome annotation pipelines have biased our view of coding sequences because they generally undersample small proteins and peptides. The recent development of genome-wide translation profiling reveals the prevalence of small/short open reading frames (smORFs or sORFs), which are scattered over all classes of transcripts, including both mRNAs and presumptive long noncoding RNAs. Proteomic approaches further confirm an unexpected variety of smORF-encoded peptides (SEPs), representing an overlooked reservoir of bioactive molecules. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060516DOI Listing
October 2017
28 Reads

Rethinking mA Readers, Writers, and Erasers.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 31;33:319-342. Epub 2017 Jul 31.

Department of Pharmacology, Weill Medical College, Cornell University, New York, New York 10065; email:

In recent years, mA has emerged as an abundant and dynamically regulated modification throughout the transcriptome. Recent technological advances have enabled the transcriptome-wide identification of mA residues, which in turn has provided important insights into the biology and regulation of this pervasive regulatory mark. Also central to our current understanding of mA are the discovery and characterization of mA readers, writers, and erasers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060758DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5963928PMC
October 2017
10 Reads

Ribosomal Stalling During Translation: Providing Substrates for Ribosome-Associated Protein Quality Control.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 17;33:343-368. Epub 2017 Jul 17.

ZMBH, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany; email:

Cells of all organisms survey problems during translation elongation, which may happen as a consequence of mRNA aberrations, inefficient decoding, or other sources. In eukaryotes, ribosome-associated quality control (RQC) senses elongation-stalled ribosomes and promotes dissociation of ribosomal subunits. This so-called ribosomal rescue releases the mRNA for degradation and allows 40S subunits to be recycled for new rounds of translation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-111315-125249DOI Listing
October 2017
9 Reads

Sending and Receiving Hedgehog Signals.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 10;33:145-168. Epub 2017 Jul 10.

Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115; email: ,

Communication between cells pervades the development and physiology of metazoans. In animals, this process is carried out by a relatively small number of signaling pathways, each consisting of a chain of biochemical events through which extracellular stimuli control the behavior of target cells. One such signaling system is the Hedgehog pathway, which is crucial in embryogenesis and is implicated in many birth defects and cancers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060847DOI Listing
October 2017
12 Reads

The FLC Locus: A Platform for Discoveries in Epigenetics and Adaptation.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 10;33:555-575. Epub 2017 Jul 10.

John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UH, United Kingdom; email:

Our understanding of the detailed molecular mechanisms underpinning adaptation is still poor. One example for which mechanistic understanding of regulation has converged with studies of life history variation is Arabidopsis thaliana FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). FLC determines the need for plants to overwinter and their ability to respond to prolonged cold in a process termed vernalization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060546DOI Listing
October 2017
28 Reads

Unconventional or Preset αβ T Cells: Evolutionarily Conserved Tissue-Resident T Cells Recognizing Nonpeptidic Ligands.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 29;33:511-535. Epub 2017 Jun 29.

Institut Curie, PSL Research University, INSERM, U 932, 75005 Paris, France; email: , ,

A majority of T cells bearing the αβ T cell receptor (TCR) are specific for peptides bound to polymorphic classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Smaller subsets of T cells are reactive toward various nonpeptidic ligands associated with nonpolymorphic MHC class-Ib (MHC-Ib) molecules. These cells have been termed unconventional for decades, even though only the composite antigen is different from the one seen by classical T cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060725DOI Listing
October 2017
9 Reads

Microtubule-Organizing Centers.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 23;33:51-75. Epub 2017 Jun 23.

Cell Biology, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, 3584 Utrecht, The Netherlands; email: ,

The organization of microtubule networks is crucial for controlling chromosome segregation during cell division, for positioning and transport of different organelles, and for cell polarity and morphogenesis. The geometry of microtubule arrays strongly depends on the localization and activity of the sites where microtubules are nucleated and where their minus ends are anchored. Such sites are often clustered into structures known as microtubule-organizing centers, which include the centrosomes in animals and spindle pole bodies in fungi. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060615DOI Listing
October 2017
16 Reads

Cell Removal: Efferocytosis.

Authors:
Peter M Henson

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 14;33:127-144. Epub 2017 Jun 14.

Department of Pediatrics, National Jewish Health, and Departments of Immunology and Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado 80206; email:

In metazoans, removal of cells in situ is involved in larval maturation, metamorphosis, and embryonic development. In adults, such cell removal plays a role in the homeostatic maintenance of cell numbers and tissue integrity as well as in the response to cell injury and damage. This removal involves uptake of the whole or fragmented target cells into phagocytes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-111315-125315DOI Listing
October 2017
11 Reads

Unconventional Roles of Opsins.

Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol 2017 10 9;33:241-264. Epub 2017 Jun 9.

Neuroscience Research Institute and Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106; email:

Rhodopsin is the classical light sensor. Although rhodopsin has long been known to be important for image formation in the eye, the requirements for opsins in non-image formation and in extraocular light sensation were revealed much later. Most recent is the demonstration that an opsin in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is expressed in pacemaker neurons in the brain and functions in light entrainment of circadian rhythms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100616-060432DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5963513PMC
October 2017
10 Reads