30 results match your criteria Annual Reports in Medicinal Chemistry[Journal]

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Anno 2021: Which antivirals for the coming decade?

Annu Rep Med Chem 2021 3;57:49-107. Epub 2021 Nov 3.

Medicinal Chemistry, Rega Institute for Medical Research, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

Despite considerable progress in the development of antiviral drugs, among which anti-immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) medications can be considered real success stories, many viral infections remain without an effective treatment. This not only applies to infectious outbreaks caused by zoonotic viruses that have recently spilled over into humans such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2), but also ancient viral diseases that have been brought under control by vaccination such as variola (smallpox), poliomyelitis, measles, and rabies. A largely unsolved problem are endemic respiratory infections due to influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and rhinoviruses, whose associated morbidity will likely worsen with increasing air pollution. Read More

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November 2021

Broad spectrum antiviral nucleosides-Our best hope for the future.

Annu Rep Med Chem 2021 29;57:109-132. Epub 2021 Oct 29.

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD, United States.

The current focus for many researchers has turned to the development of therapeutics that have the potential for serving as broad-spectrum inhibitors that can target numerous viruses, both within a particular family, as well as to span across multiple viral families. This will allow us to build an arsenal of therapeutics that could be used for the next outbreak. In that regard, nucleosides have served as the cornerstone for antiviral therapy for many decades. Read More

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October 2021

Improving properties of the nucleobase analogs T-705/T-1105 as potential antiviral.

Annu Rep Med Chem 2021 28;57:1-47. Epub 2021 Oct 28.

Organic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics, Informatics and Natural Sciences, Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.

In this minireview we describe our work on the improvement of the nucleobase analogs Favipiravir (T-705) und its non-fluorinated derivative T-1105 as influenza and SARS-CoV-2 active compounds. Both nucleobases were converted into nucleotides and then included in our nucleotide prodrugs technologies cycloSal-monophosphates, Diro-nucleoside diphosphates and Triro-nucleoside triphosphates. Particularly the Diro-derivatives of T-1105-RDP proved to be very active against influenza viruses. Read More

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October 2021

Fundamentals of G-quadruplex biology.

Authors:
F Brad Johnson

Annu Rep Med Chem 2020 30;54:3-44. Epub 2020 Jul 30.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States.

Several decades elapsed between the first descriptions of G-quadruplex nucleic acid structures (G4s) assembled and the emergence of experimental findings indicating that such structures can form and function in living systems. A large body of evidence now supports roles for G4s in many aspects of nucleic acid biology, spanning processes from transcription and chromatin structure, mRNA processing, protein translation, DNA replication and genome stability, and telomere and mitochondrial function. Nonetheless, it must be acknowledged that some of this evidence is tentative, which is not surprising given the technical challenges associated with demonstrating G4s in biology. Read More

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Viral G-quadruplexes: New frontiers in virus pathogenesis and antiviral therapy.

Annu Rep Med Chem 2020 18;54:101-131. Epub 2020 May 18.

Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, Italy.

Viruses are the most abundant organisms on our planet, affecting all living beings: some of them are responsible for massive epidemics that concern health, national economies and the overall welfare of societies. Although advances in antiviral research have led to successful therapies against several human viruses, still some of them cannot be eradicated from the host and most of them do not have any treatment available. Consequently, innovative antiviral therapies are urgently needed. Read More

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Antiviral Agents Against Ebola Virus Infection: Repositioning Old Drugs and Finding Novel Small Molecules.

Annu Rep Med Chem 2018 22;51:135-173. Epub 2018 Sep 22.

Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.

Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a deadly hemorrhagic syndrome in humans with mortality rate up to 90%. First reported in Zaire in 1976, EBOV outbreaks showed a fluctuating trend during time and fora long period it was considered a tragic disease confined to the isolated regions of the African continent where the EBOV fear was perpetuated among the poor communities. The extreme severity of the recent 2014-16 EBOV outbreak in terms of fatality rate and rapid spread out of Africa led to the understanding that EBOV is a global health risk and highlights the necessity to find countermeasures against it. Read More

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September 2018

Cumulative Chapter Titles Keyword Index, Volume 1 - 50.

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Annu Rep Med Chem 2017 20;50:597-620. Epub 2017 Nov 20.

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November 2017

Cumulative Chapter Titles Keyword Index, Volume 1 - 49.

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Annu Rep Med Chem 2014 3;49:519-542. Epub 2014 Oct 3.

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October 2014

Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Metabolites in Lead Discovery and Development.

Annu Rep Med Chem 2014;49:347-359

Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, The University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., MS-1018, Kansas City, KS 66160.

The cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are a versatile superfamily of heme-containing monooxygenases, perhaps best known for their role in the oxidation of xenobiotic compounds. However, due to their unique oxidative chemistry, CYPs are also important in natural product drug discovery and in the generation of active metabolites with unique therapeutic properties. New tools for the analysis and production of CYP metabolites, including microscale analytical technologies and combinatorial biosynthesis, are providing medicinal chemists with the opportunity to use CYPs as a novel platform for lead discovery and development. Read More

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January 2014

Cumulative Chapter Titles Keyword Index, Volume 1 - 48.

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Annu Rep Med Chem 2013 13;48:555-577. Epub 2013 Sep 13.

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September 2013

Cumulative Chapter Titles Keyword Index, Volume 1 - 47.

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Annu Rep Med Chem 2012 25;47:581-603. Epub 2012 Sep 25.

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September 2012

Drug Design Strategies for GPCR Allosteric Modulators.

Annu Rep Med Chem 2012;47:441-457

Discovery Chemistry & DMPK, Lundbeck Research DK, Valby, Denmark and Neuroinflammation Disease Biology Unit, Lundbeck Research USA, Paramus, New Jersey, USA.

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January 2012

Cumulative Chapter Titles Keyword Index, Volume 1-46.

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Annu Rep Med Chem 2011 14;46:511-530. Epub 2011 Oct 14.

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October 2011

Cumulative Chapter Titles Keyword Index, Volume 1-45.

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Annu Rep Med Chem 2010 13;45:561-579. Epub 2010 Oct 13.

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October 2010

Cumulative Chapter Titles Keyword Index, Volume 1-44.

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Annu Rep Med Chem 2009 6;44:645-664. Epub 2009 Oct 6.

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October 2009

Cumulative Chapter Titles Keyword Index, Volume 1-43.

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Annu Rep Med Chem 2008 7;43:505-523. Epub 2008 Oct 7.

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October 2008

Progress in Anti-SARS Coronavirus Chemistry, Biology and Chemotherapy.

Annu Rep Med Chem 2007 Feb;41:183-196

Departments of Chemistry and Medicinal Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

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February 2007

Cumulative Chapter Titles Keyword Index, Vol. 1-42.

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Annu Rep Med Chem 2007 7;42:565-582. Epub 2007 Nov 7.

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November 2007

Compound Name, Code Number and Subject Index. Vol. 42.

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Annu Rep Med Chem 2007 7;42:555-563. Epub 2007 Nov 7.

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November 2007

Chapter 26 The Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network (MLSCN): Identifying Chemical Probes of Biological Systems.

Annu Rep Med Chem 2007 7;42:401-416. Epub 2007 Nov 7.

San Diego Center for Chemical Genomics, Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.

The NIH Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network (MLSCN) is a subset of the Molecular Libraries Initiative (MLI) component of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. The ultimate goal of the MLSCN and the MLI is to expand the availability, flexibility, and use of small-molecule chemical probes for basic research. A number of aspects of the MLSCN make this initiative unique from other academic screening center. Read More

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November 2007

Cumulative Chapter Titles Keyword Index, Vol. 1-41.

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Annu Rep Med Chem 2006 26;41:485-502. Epub 2007 Jan 26.

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January 2007

Compound Name, Code Number and Subject Index. Vol. 41.

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Annu Rep Med Chem 2006 26;41:479-484. Epub 2007 Jan 26.

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January 2007

Developing Infectious Disease Strategies for the Developing World.

Annu Rep Med Chem 2006 26;41:275-285. Epub 2007 Jan 26.

Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY 11501, USA.

This chapter discusses various drugs for human influenza A (H5N1) and multidrug-resistant mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The H5N1 avian influenza does not presently meet the criteria of an antigenically shifted strain. It is presently an avian strain that has not undergone reassortment with a human strain and is not well adapted to humans. Read More

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January 2007

Biowarfare Pathogens. Is the Research Flavor Different Than That of Clinically Relevant Pathogens?

Authors:
Ving J Lee

Annu Rep Med Chem 2004 19;39:211-221. Epub 2004 Nov 19.

Anacor Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Palo Alto, CA 94303, USA.

This chapter introduces four chemical warfare agents: bacillus anthracis (anthrax), yersinia pestis (plague), variola major (smallpox), and francesella tularensis (tularemia). Anthrax is a dimorphic bacterium that normally exists as spores. The clinical presentation can be as cutaneous, inhalational or gastrointestinal forms that are fortuitously not transmissible from person to person. Read More

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November 2004

Compound name, code numcer and subject index, vol. 38.

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Annu Rep Med Chem 2003 9;38:397-406. Epub 2004 Mar 9.

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Chapter 22. Non-HIV antiviral agents.

Annu Rep Med Chem 2003 9;38:213-228. Epub 2004 Mar 9.

Department of Chemistry, The Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute 5 Research Parkway, Wallingford, CT 06492, USA.

This chapter focuses on non-HIV antiviral agents. The development of antiviral agents to treat non-HIV infections is largely focused on therapies for the treatment of chronic hepatitis infections B and C. Nucleoside analog continue to be the mainstay of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) therapeutics. Read More

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Chapter 13. A Adenosine Receptors.

Annu Rep Med Chem 2003;38:121-130

Molecular Recognition Section, Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892.

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January 2003

Chapter 12. Antiviral Agents.

Authors:
James L Kelley

Annu Rep Med Chem 1984 10;19:117-126. Epub 2008 Apr 10.

Wellcome Research Laboratories, Burroughs Wellcome Co. Research Triangle Park, NC 27709.

This chapter discusses the agents with activity primarily against RNA viruses. The communicable diseases of the respiratory tract are probably the most common cause of symptomatic human infections. The viruses that are causative agents for human respiratory disease comprise the five taxonomically distinct families: orthomyxoviridae, paramyxoviridae, picornaviridae, coronaviridae, and adenoviridae. Read More

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