396 results match your criteria Annals of the ICRP[Journal]


CORRIGENDUM.

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Ann ICRP 2018 Dec 6:146645318814095. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318814095DOI Listing
December 2018

ADDENDUM.

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Ann ICRP 2018 Dec 6:146645318814093. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318814093DOI Listing
December 2018

The International Commission on Radiological Protection at 90.

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Ann ICRP 2018 Oct;47(3-4):343-345

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318795909DOI Listing
October 2018

EURAMED's vision on medical radiation protection (research).

Authors:
C Hoeschen

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 3;47(3-4):152-158. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

Institute for Medical Technology, Faculty for Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg, Germany.

While many areas of radiation protection have formed so-called 'platforms' in Europe which provide strategic research agendas for their areas of interest, this did not happen for a long while for medical exposure, which is the application of ionising radiation that causes the greatest man-made exposure, at least in first world countries. Finally, in 2015, a European medical radiation protection strategic research agenda was set up, and a corresponding platform was launched in 2016. This was named 'EURAMED' - the European Alliance for Medical Radiation Protection Research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318759621DOI Listing
October 2018

Integration of radiological protection of the environment into the system of radiological protection.

Authors:
K A Higley

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 30;47(3-4):270-284. Epub 2018 Jul 30.

School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 141 Batcheller Hall, Corvallis, OR 97330, USA.

In 2005, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) decided to create a new committee, Committee 5, to take charge of the Commission's work on environmental radiological protection. Committee 5 was tasked with ensuring that the system for environmental radiological protection would be reconcilable with that for radiological protection of humans, and with the approaches used for protection of the environment from other potential hazards. The task was completed over three consecutive terms, resulting in inclusion of protection of the environment in the 2007 Recommendations; in ICRP Publications 108 and 114 where the concept of Reference Animals and Plants (RAPs) and their corresponding data were described; in ICRP Publication 124 on how to apply the system in planned, existing, and emergency exposure situations; and in publications on improved dosimetry (ICRP Publication 136) and ecologically relevant 'weighting factors' for different types of radiation (being finalised for public consultation). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756823DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads

Corrigendum.

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Ann ICRP 2018 Jan 1:146645318787612. Epub 2018 Jan 1.

Corrigendum to ICRP Publication 137: Occupational intakes of radionuclides: Part 3. [Ann. ICRP 46(3/4), 2017]. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318787612DOI Listing
January 2018

Corrigendum.

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Ann ICRP 2018 Jan 1:146645318785181. Epub 2018 Jan 1.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318785181DOI Listing
January 2018

Radiosensitivity and transgenerational effects in non-human species.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 10;47(3-4):327-341. Epub 2018 May 10.

f Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Belgium.

The ALLIANCE working group on effects of ionising radiation on wildlife brings together European researchers to work on the topics of radiosensitivity and transgenerational effects in non-human biota. Differences in radiation sensitivity across species and phyla are poorly understood, but have important implications for understanding the overall effects of radiation and for radiation protection; for example, sensitive species may require special attention in monitoring and radiation protection, and differences in sensitivity between species also lead to overall effects at higher levels (community, ecosystem), since interactions between species can be altered. Hence, understanding the mechanisms of interspecies radiation sensitivity differences may help to clarify mechanisms underpinning intraspecies variation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756844DOI Listing
October 2018

Radiotherapeutic implications of the updated ICRP thresholds for tissue reactions related to cataracts and circulatory diseases.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 9;47(3-4):196-213. Epub 2018 May 9.

e Compultense University, Spain.

Radiation therapy of cancer patients involves a trade-off between a sufficient tumour dose for a high probability of local control and dose to organs at risk that is low enough to lead to a clinically acceptable probability of toxicity. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reviewed epidemiological evidence and provided updated estimates of 'practical' threshold doses for tissue injury, as defined at the level of 1% incidence, in ICRP Publication 118. Particular attention was paid to cataracts and circulatory diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318759622DOI Listing
October 2018

Proton therapy technology evolution in the clinic: impact on radiation protection.

Authors:
T Depuydt

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 1;47(3-4):177-186. Epub 2018 May 1.

a UZ Leuven, Belgium.

The use of proton therapy as a treatment modality is becoming more widespread in conventional radiation therapy practice. Commercialisation and introduction of compact systems has led to embedding of proton therapy facilities in existing hospital environments. In addition, technologically, proton therapy is currently undergoing an important evolution, moving from passive scattering delivery techniques to active pencil beam scanning, adopting image guidance techniques from conventional radiotherapy and introducing various range verification techniques in the clinic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756252DOI Listing
October 2018

The Irish approach to postaccident preparedness.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 1;47(3-4):260-269. Epub 2018 May 1.

a Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiation Protection and Environmental Monitoring, McCumiskey House, Richview, Clonskeagh, Dublin 14, D14YR62, Ireland.

Ireland does not have any nuclear installations, but a nuclear accident at a site elsewhere, particularly in Europe, could result in widespread but low-level contamination of the Irish environment. Ireland's National Emergency Plan for Nuclear Accidents was established, following the Chernobyl accident, for the national response to a nuclear accident abroad affecting Ireland. It has since been extended to also cover domestic radiological emergencies for which a national-level input is required to support the local response. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756822DOI Listing
October 2018
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The mandate and work of ICRP Committee 3 on radiological protection in medicine.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 1;47(3-4):142-151. Epub 2018 May 1.

c Massachusetts General Hospital & Harvard Medical School, USA.

The mandate of Committee 3 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is concerned with the protection of persons and unborn children when ionising radiation is used in medical diagnosis, therapy, and biomedical research. Protection in veterinary medicine has been newly added to the mandate. Committee 3 develops recommendations and guidance in these areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756249DOI Listing
October 2018
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Integrated protection of humans and the environment: a view from Japan.

Authors:
K Sakai

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 27;47(3-4):298-303. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

Faculty of Nursing, Tokyo Healthcare University, 2-5-1 Higashigaoka, Meguroku, Tokyo 152-8558, Japan.

Six and a half years after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, an area of existing exposure situation remains. One of the main concerns of people is the higher level of ionising radiation than before the accident, although this is not expected to have any discernible health effect. Since the accident, several 'abnormalities' in environmental organisms have been reported. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756835DOI Listing
October 2018

Australia's proactive approach to radiation protection of the environment: how integrated is it with radiation protection of humans?

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 27;47(3-4):313-326. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, 619 Lower Plenty Rd, Yallambie, 3085 Victoria, Australia.

Australia's regulatory framework has evolved over the past decade from the assumption that protection of humans implies protection of the environment to the situation now where radiological impacts on non-human species (wildlife) are considered in their own right. In an Australian context, there was a recognised need for specific national guidance on protection of non-human species, for which the uranium mining industry provides the major backdrop. National guidance supported by publications of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (Radiation Protection Series) provides clear and consistent advice to operators and regulators on protection of non-human species, including advice on specific assessment methods and models, and how these might be applied in an Australian context. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756842DOI Listing
October 2018

Cancer risk from paediatric computed tomography scanning: implications for radiation protection in medicine.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 20;47(3-4):113-114. Epub 2018 Apr 20.

b Barcelona Institute for Global Health - ISGlobal, University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain.

The use of computed tomography (CT) imaging is clearly beneficial for millions of patients. However, the potential adverse health effects, particularly cancer, of ionising radiation exposure from CT early in life are an issue of growing concern in the radiological protection, medical, and public health communities. Although efforts to quantify these effects have been conducted, the precision and accuracy of reported risks needs confirmation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756236DOI Listing
October 2018

The need for, and implementation of, image guidance in radiation therapy.

Authors:
G S Ibbott

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 20;47(3-4):160-176. Epub 2018 Apr 20.

Department of Radiation Physics, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1400 Pressler St., Unit 1420, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

The introduction of image guidance in radiation therapy and its subsequent innovations have revolutionised the delivery of cancer treatment. Modern imaging systems can supplement and often replace the historical practice of relying on external landmarks and laser alignment systems. Rather than depending on markings on the patient's skin, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), using techniques such as computed tomography (CT), cone beam CT, MV on-board imaging (OBI), and kV OBI, allows the patient to be positioned based on the internal anatomy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318764092DOI Listing
October 2018

ALLIANCE perspectives on integration of humans and the environment into the system of radiological protection.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 19;47(3-4):285-297. Epub 2018 Apr 19.

e Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, France.

Risks posed by the presence of radionuclides in the environment require an efficient, balanced, and adaptable assessment for protecting exposed humans and wildlife, and managing the associated radiological risk. Exposure of humans and wildlife originate from the same sources releasing radionuclides to the environment. Environmental concentrations of radionuclides serve as inputs to estimate the dose to man, fauna, and flora, with transfer processes being, in essence, similar, which calls for a common use of transport models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756831DOI Listing
October 2018

Corrigendum.

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Ann ICRP 2018 Jan 1:146645318773608. Epub 2018 Jan 1.

Corrigendum to ICRP Publication 139: Occupational radiological protection in interventional procedures. [Ann. ICRP 47(2), 2018]. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318773608DOI Listing
January 2018

Targeted alpha-particle therapy: imaging, dosimetry, and radiation protection.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 17;47(3-4):187-195. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Würzburg, Oberdürrbacher Str. 6, D-97080 Würzburg, Germany.

Systemic or locoregionally administered alpha-particle emitters are highly potent therapeutic agents used in oncology that are fundamentally novel in their mechanism and, most likely, overcome radiation resistance as the alpha particles emitted have a short range and a high linear energy transfer. The use of alpha emitters in a clinic environment requires extra measures with respect to imaging, dosimetry, and radiation protection. This is shown for the example of Ra dichloride therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756253DOI Listing
October 2018

The work programme of EURADOS on internal and external dosimetry.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 17;47(3-4):20-34. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

a Department of Radiation Sciences, Institute for Radiation Protection, Helmholtz Centre Munich, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany.

Since the early 1980s, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has been maintaining a network of institutions interested in the dosimetry of ionising radiation. As of 2017, this network includes more than 70 institutions (research centres, dosimetry services, university institutes, etc.), and the EURADOS database lists more than 500 scientists who contribute to the EURADOS mission, which is to promote research and technical development in dosimetry and its implementation into practice, and to contribute to harmonisation of dosimetry in Europe and its conformance with international practices. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0146645318756224
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756224DOI Listing
October 2018
7 Reads

EURADOS work on internal dosimetry.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 17;47(3-4):75-82. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

j Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, Spain.

European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) Working Group 7 is a network on internal dosimetry that brings together researchers from more than 60 institutions in 21 countries. The work of the group is organised into task groups that focus on different aspects, such as development and implementation of biokinetic models (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756232DOI Listing
October 2018
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The new mandate and work of ICRP Committee 4.

Authors:
D A Cool

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 16;47(3-4):214-220. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 W. WT Harris Blvd, Charlotte, NC 28262-8550, USA.

Committee 4 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is charged with the development of principles and recommendations on radiological protection of people and the environment in all exposure situations. For the term beginning in July 2017, the Committee has a total of 18 members from 12 countries. The programme of work includes a wide range of activities in five major thematic areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756254DOI Listing
October 2018

Medical and health surveillance in postaccident recovery: experience after Fukushima.

Authors:
K Tanigawa

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 16;47(3-4):229-240. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

Fukushima Global Medical Science Centre, Fukushima Medical University, 1- Hikariga-Oka, Fukushima 960-1295, Japan.

The accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant occurred following the huge tsunami and earthquake of 11 March 2011. After the accident, there was considerable uncertainty and concern about the health effects of radiation. In this difficult situation, emergency responses, including large-scale evacuation, were implemented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756819DOI Listing
October 2018

ICRP Task Group 95: internal dose coefficients.

Authors:
F Paquet J Harrison

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 16;47(3-4):63-74. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

b Public Health England and Oxford Brookes University, UK.

Internal doses are calculated using biokinetic and dosimetric models. These models describe the behaviour of the radionuclides after ingestion, inhalation, and absorption to the blood, and the absorption of the energy resulting from their nuclear transformations. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) develops such models and applies them to provide dose coefficients and bioassay functions for the calculation of equivalent or effective dose from knowledge of intakes and/or measurements of activity in bioassay samples. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318759620DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Corrigendum.

Authors:

Ann ICRP 2018 Jan 1:146645318773622. Epub 2018 Jan 1.

Corrigendum to ICRP Publication 128: Radiation dose to patients from radiopharmaceuticals: a compendium of current information related to frequently used substances. [Ann. ICRP 44(2S), 2015]. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318773622DOI Listing
January 2018

Cancer risk following alpha-emitter exposure.

Authors:
M Tirmarche

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 16;47(3-4):115-125. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

Nuclear Safety Authority, ASN, 15, rue Louis Lejeune, 92541 Montrouge, France.

The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) mandated a task group (Task Group 64) to review recently published epidemiological studies related to cancer risk and incorporated alpha emitters, and to evaluate whether the results might consolidate or challenge assumptions underlying the current radiation protection system. Three major alpha emitters were considered: radon and its decay products, plutonium, and uranium. Results came mainly from cohorts of workers, while for radon, major studies of the general population contributed to a better understanding of the risk of lung cancer at low and chronic exposure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756247DOI Listing
October 2018

Multi-modal imaging for dose planning and its benefits: the paradigm of head and neck tumours.

Authors:
V Grégoire

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 13;47(3-4):159. Epub 2018 Apr 13.

Université Catholique de Louvain, St-Luc University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department and Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology Centre, Brussels, Belgium.

The ultimate goal of any radiotherapy is to eradicate the disease without inflicting damage on the normal tissues surrounding the tumours, which could be responsible for late treatment morbidity. To achieve this objective, the first step is to precisely select and delineate the target volumes to which a given dose will be prescribed. This step requires the use of multi-modal images from clinical examination to anatomical and molecular images. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756250DOI Listing
October 2018

The work programme of NERIS in post-accident recovery.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 13;47(3-4):221-228. Epub 2018 Apr 13.

j Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany.

NERIS is the European platform on preparedness for nuclear and radiological emergency response and recovery. Created in 2010 with 57 organisations from 28 different countries, the objectives of the platform are to: improve the effectiveness and coherency of current approaches to preparedness; identify further development needs; improve 'know how' and technical expertise; and establish a forum for dialogue and methodological development. The NERIS Strategic Research Agenda is now structured with three main challenges: (i) radiological impact assessments during all phases of nuclear and radiological events; (ii) countermeasures and countermeasure strategies in emergency and recovery, decision support, and disaster informatics; and (iii) setting up a multi-faceted framework for preparedness for emergency response and recovery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756291DOI Listing
October 2018

Evidence for dose and dose rate effects in human and animal radiation studies.

Authors:
M P Little

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 13;47(3-4):97-112. Epub 2018 Apr 13.

Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-9778, USA.

For stochastic effects such as cancer, linear-quadratic models of dose are often used to extrapolate from the experience of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors to estimate risks from low doses and low dose rates. The low dose extrapolation factor (LDEF), which consists of the ratio of the low dose slope (as derived via fitting a linear-quadratic model) to the slope of the straight line fitted to a specific dose range, is used to derive the degree of overestimation (if LDEF > 1) or underestimation (if LDEF < 1) of low dose risk by linear extrapolation from effects at higher doses. Likewise, a dose rate extrapolation factor (DREF) can be defined, consisting of the ratio of the low dose slopes at high and low dose rates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756235DOI Listing
October 2018

Computational phantoms, ICRP/ICRU, and further developments.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 13;47(3-4):35-44. Epub 2018 Apr 13.

d Hanyang University, Korea.

Phantoms simulating the human body play a central role in radiation dosimetry. The first computational body phantoms were based upon mathematical expressions describing idealised body organs. With the advent of more powerful computers in the 1980s, voxel phantoms have been developed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756229DOI Listing
October 2018
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Outcome of the European initiative for radiation protection research and future perspectives.

Authors:
J Repussard

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 13;47(3-4):91-96. Epub 2018 Apr 13.

Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI), c/o Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses CEDEX, France.

In 2009, the European Commission published the report of the high-level expert group that had been mandated to consider the scientific challenges posed by the issues of low dose effects of ionising radiation, and to formulate proposals for research policy evolution in this field at European level. This report formulated a first draft of a strategic research agenda. International scientific cooperation and an integrated approach are essential for the further development and enhancement of the international framework of radiation protection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756234DOI Listing
October 2018

New mesh-type phantoms and their dosimetric applications, including emergencies.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 13;47(3-4):45-62. Epub 2018 Apr 13.

h Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA.

Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has constructed mesh-type adult reference computational phantoms by converting the voxel-type ICRP Publication 110 adult reference computational phantoms to a high-quality mesh format, and adding those tissues that were below the image resolution of the voxel phantoms and therefore not included in the Publication 110 phantoms. The new mesh phantoms include all the necessary source and target tissues for effective dose calculations, including the 8-40-µm-thick target layers of the alimentary and respiratory tract organs, thereby obviating the need for supplemental organ-specific stylised models (e.g. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0146645318756231
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756231DOI Listing
October 2018
13 Reads

The mandate and work of ICRP Committee 2 on doses from radiation exposure.

Authors:
J D Harrison

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 13;47(3-4):9-19. Epub 2018 Apr 13.

a Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0RQ, UK.

The practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of radiological protection requires the availability of appropriate methodology and data. Over many years, ICRP Committee 2 has provided sets of dose coefficients to allow users to evaluate equivalent and effective doses for radiation exposures of workers and members of the public. The methodology being applied in the calculation of doses is state-of-the-art in terms of the biokinetic models used to describe the behaviour of inhaled and ingested radionuclides, and the dosimetric models used to model radiation transport for external and internal exposures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756223DOI Listing
October 2018

Role of individual dosimetry for affected residents in postaccident recovery: the Fukushima experience.

Authors:
W Naito M Uesaka

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 12;47(3-4):241-253. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Research Institute of Science for Safety and Sustainability, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569, Japan.

The accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on 11 March 2011 released radioactive material into the atmosphere, and contaminated land in Fukushima and several neighbouring prefectures. During rehabilitation, it is important to accurately understand and determine individual external doses to allow individuals to make informed decisions about whether or not to return to the affected areas. Personal dosimeters (D-Shuttle), used together with a global positioning system and geographic information system device, can provide realistic individual external doses and associated individual external doses, ambient doses, and activity patterns of individuals in the affected areas of Fukushima. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756820DOI Listing
October 2018
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The Fourth International Symposium on the System of Radiological Protection.

Authors:

Ann ICRP 2018 10 12;47(3-4):5-8. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318759619DOI Listing
October 2018

The mandate and work of ICRP Committee 1 on radiation effects.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 12;47(3-4):83-90. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

c Nuclear Safety Authority, France.

The aim of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is to protect humans against cancer and other diseases and effects associated with exposure to ionising radiation, and also to protect the environment, without unduly limiting the beneficial use of ionising radiation. As of the second half of 2017, four committees are contributing to the overall mission of ICRP, including Committee 1 (Radiation Effects). The role of Committee 1 includes consideration of the risks and mechanisms of induction of cancer and heritable disease; discussion of the risks, severity, and mechanisms of induction of tissue/organ damage and developmental defects; and review of the effects of ionising radiation on non-human biota at population level. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756233DOI Listing
October 2018

The role of experts in postaccident recovery: lessons learnt from Chernobyl and Fukushima.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 12;47(3-4):254-259. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

b Centre d'Etude sur l'Evaluation de la Protection dans le Domaine du Nucléaire, France.

Following a nuclear accident, a major dilemma for affected people is whether to stay or leave the affected area, or, for those who have been evacuated, whether or not to return to the decontaminated zones. Populations who have to make such decisions have to consider many parameters, one of which is the radiological situation. Feedback from Chernobyl and Fukushima has demonstrated that involvement and empowerment of the affected population is a way to provide them with the necessary elements to make informed decisions and, if they decide to return to decontaminated areas, to minimise exposure by contributing to the development of a prudent attitude and vigilance towards exposure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756821DOI Listing
October 2018

Implementation of the integrated approach in different types of exposure scenarios.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 12;47(3-4):304-312. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

g International Atomic Energy Agency, Austria.

The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recognises three types of exposure situations: planned, existing, and emergency. In all three situations, the release of radionuclides into the natural environment leads to exposures of non-human biota, as well as the potential for exposures of the public. This paper describes how the key principles of the ICRP system of radiological protection apply to non-human biota and members of the public in each of these exposure situations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756837DOI Listing
October 2018

Human individual radiation sensitivity and prospects for prediction.

Ann ICRP 2018 Oct 12;47(3-4):126-141. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

d Centre for Radiation Protection Research, MBW Department, Stockholm University, Sweden.

In the past few decades, it has become increasingly evident that sensitivity to ionising radiation is variable. This is true for tissue reactions (deterministic effects) after high doses of radiation, for stochastic effects following moderate and possibly low doses, and conceivably also for non-cancer effects such as cardiovascular disease, the causal pathway(s) of which are not yet fully understood. A high sensitivity to deterministic effects is not necessarily correlated with a high sensitivity to stochastic effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645318764091DOI Listing
October 2018

ICRP Publication 139: Occupational Radiological Protection in Interventional Procedures.

Ann ICRP 2018 Mar;47(2):1-118

Abstract: In recent publications, such as Publications 117 and 120, the Commission provided practical advice for physicians and other healthcare personnel on measures to protect their patients and themselves during interventional procedures. These measures can only be effective if they are encompassed by a framework of radiological protection elements, and by the availability of professionals with responsibilities in radiological protection. This framework includes a radiological protection programme with a strategy for exposure monitoring, protective garments, education and training, and quality assurance of the programme implementation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645317750356DOI Listing

ICRP Publication 138: Ethical Foundations of the System of Radiological Protection.

Ann ICRP 2018 Feb;47(1):1-65

Abstract –: Despite a longstanding recognition that radiological protection is not only a matter of science, but also ethics, ICRP publications have rarely addressed the ethical foundations of the system of radiological protection explicitly. The purpose of this publication is to describe how the Commission has relied on ethical values, either intentionally or indirectly, in developing the system of radiological protection with the objective of presenting a coherent view of how ethics is part of this system. In so doing, it helps to clarify the inherent value judgements made in achieving the aim of the radiological protection system as underlined by the Commission in Publication 103. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645317746010DOI Listing
February 2018
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Corrigendum.

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Ann ICRP 2017 12;46(3-4):487

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645317741391DOI Listing
December 2017

ICRP Publication 137: Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides: Part 3.

Ann ICRP 2017 Dec;46(3-4):1-486

Abstract –: The 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP, 2007) introduced changes that affect the calculation of effective dose, and implied a revision of the dose coefficients for internal exposure, published previously in the Publication 30 series (ICRP, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1988) and Publication 68 (ICRP, 1994). In addition, new data are now available that support an update of the radionuclide-specific information given in Publications 54 and 78 (ICRP, 1988a, 1997b) for the design of monitoring programmes and retrospective assessment of occupational internal doses. Provision of new biokinetic models, dose coefficients, monitoring methods, and bioassay data was performed by Committee 2, Task Group 21 on Internal Dosimetry, and Task Group 4 on Dose Calculations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645317734963DOI Listing
December 2017
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ICRP Publication 136: Dose Coefficients for Non-human Biota Environmentally Exposed to Radiation.

Ann ICRP 2017 Dec;46(2):1-136

Abstract –: The diversity of non-human biota is a specific challenge when developing and applying dosimetric models for assessing exposures of flora and fauna from radioactive sources in the environment. Dosimetric models, adopted in Publication 108, provide dose coefficients (DCs) for a group of reference entities [Reference Animals and Plants (RAPs)]. The DCs can be used to evaluate doses and dose rates, and to compare the latter with derived consideration reference levels (DCRLs), which are bands of dose rate where some sort of detrimental effect in a particular RAP may be expected to occur following chronic, long-term radiation exposure, as outlined in Publication 124. Read More

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December 2017

ICRP Publication 135: Diagnostic Reference Levels in Medical Imaging.

Ann ICRP 2017 Oct;46(1):1-144

Abstract –: The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) first introduced the term ‘diagnostic reference level’ (DRL) in 1996 in Publication 73. The concept was subsequently developed further, and practical guidance was provided in 2001. The DRL has been proven to be an effective tool that aids in optimisation of protection in the medical exposure of patients for diagnostic and interventional procedures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645317717209DOI Listing
October 2017

Experiences of Fukushima.

Ann ICRP 2016 Dec 15;45(2_suppl):4-6. Epub 2016 Dec 15.

ICRP Scientific Secretary.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645316680583DOI Listing
December 2016
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The genesis of the ICRP dialogue initiative.

Authors:
Jacques Lochard

Ann ICRP 2016 Dec;45(2_suppl):7-13

ICRP Vice-chair.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146645317729633DOI Listing
December 2016
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ICRP Fukushima dialogue seminars: joint learning at many levels.

Authors:
A Liland

Ann ICRP 2016 Dec 15;45(2_suppl):92-98. Epub 2016 Dec 15.

Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and CERAD Centre of Excellence, P.O. Box 55, No-1332 Østerås, Norway.

The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and representatives from the CERAD Centre of Excellence participated at the majority of the International Commission on Radiological Protection dialogue seminars in Fukushima between 2011 and 2015. The open and sharing structure of the seminars contributed to an unprecedented understanding of the challenges faced by the general public affected by radioactive contamination due to an accident at a nuclear power plant. Most importantly by presentations from people in Fukushima, but also by presentations from lay people in Norway and Belarus who shared their experiences from the Chernobyl accident at several seminars. Read More

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December 2016