192 results match your criteria Annals of periodontology[Journal]


Periodontitis in humans and non-human primates: oral-systemic linkage inducing acute phase proteins.

Ann Periodontol 2002 Dec;7(1):102-11

Center for Oral Health Research, University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.

Background: The acute phase response (APR) represents a systemic counterpart to the localized inflammatory response. This report describes patient-oriented and non-human primate model studies to determine the effect of periodontal disease on systemic acute phase proteins (APP).

Methods: Patient-oriented studies included comparison of the levels of APP, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with the presence and severity of periodontitis in localized chronic periodontitis (LCP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP), and Sjogren's syndrome (SS) patients. Read More

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December 2002
6 Reads

Periodontal disease increases the risk of preterm delivery among preeclamptic women.

Ann Periodontol 2002 Dec;7(1):95-101

Center for Oral and Systemic Diseases and Comprehensive Center for Inflammatory Disorders, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Background: Preterm births are a major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, and represent an important public health issue. About 30% of preterm births are due to medical conditions of the mother or the fetus, among "which preeclampsia plays a major role. We have previously reported that maternal periodontal disease enhances the risk for preterm delivery and preeclampsia. Read More

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December 2002
5 Reads

Cellular responses to oral pathogens.

Ann Periodontol 2002 Dec;7(1):90-4

Department of Oral Biology, University at Buffalo, New York, USA.

Background: Several previous epidemiological studies, along with the results of more recent animal model approaches, have suggested a role for periodontitis in atherosclerosis. Such an association could be mediated by direct interactions of periodontopathic bacteria with host vascular tissues.

Methods: The interactions of Porphyromonas gingivalis with endothelial cells and macrophages in vitro were investigated relative to modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Read More

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December 2002

Relationships among clinical measures of periodontal disease and their associations with systemic markers.

Ann Periodontol 2002 Dec;7(1):79-89

Department of Dental Ecology University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Background: Recent investigations of the relationship between periodontitis and systemic disease require that periodontal disease also must be thought of as a disease process that is an exposure for a systemic disease or condition (outcome), rather than as the outcome itself. When viewing periodontal disease as an exposure, investigators must consider the clinical, microbiological, and inflammatory components of periodontitis that potentially convey risk for the systemic outcome of interest, which may or may not be the same as those associated with the assessments used to define tooth-based disease. Another important consideration is the temporal relationship between the exposure and the outcome of interest. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1902/annals.2002.7.1.79
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December 2002
5 Reads

Interactions of oral pathogens with toll-like receptors: possible role in atherosclerosis.

Ann Periodontol 2002 Dec;7(1):72-8

Department of Oral Biology, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.

Toll-like receptors (TLR) function as important signal transducers that mediate innate immune and inflammatory responses to pathogens through pattern recognition of virulence molecules. Although TLRs mediate protection against infection, it is also likely that they may have a pathophysiologic role in certain inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. In atherosclerotic lesions, endothelial cells and macrophages have been shown to upregulate TLR expression and may respond to TLR agonists of microbial origin, resulting in detrimental inflammatory reactions. Read More

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December 2002
1 Read

Immune processes in periodontal disease: a review.

Ann Periodontol 2002 Dec;7(1):62-71

University of Glasgow Dental School, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom.

The inflammatory and immune processes in periodontitis are complex and, although a great deal of information is available, many questions remain. Variation in human susceptibility to periodontitis has long been accepted, but the pathological basis of this is poorly understood. Similarly, we know little of the differences, if any, between the pathology of chronic and aggressive periodontitis. Read More

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December 2002
11 Reads

Population studies of microbial ecology in periodontal health and disease.

Ann Periodontol 2002 Dec;7(1):54-61

Division of Periodontics, Columbia University School of Dental and Oral Surgery, New York, New York, USA.

It has been established that the bacterial diversity in any given environment is severely underestimated when assessed by means of culture-based techniques. Yet, almost all currently available knowledge related to the periodontal microbiota in health and disease has been generated either by culture-based surveys or by methods that require prior species identification by culture. A handful of recent studies using culture-independent molecular methods providing 16S rRNA sequences for both cultivable and not yet cultivated species of human periodontal bacteria demonstrated a high bacterial diversity in the oral cavity. Read More

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December 2002
1 Read

Campylobacter surface-layers (S-layers) and immune evasion.

Ann Periodontol 2002 Dec;7(1):43-53

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia 30912, USA.

Many pathogenic bacteria have evolved mechanisms for evading host immune systems. One evasion mechanism is manifest by the surface layer (S-layer), a paracrystalline protein structure composed of S-layer proteins (SLPs). The S-layer, possessed by 2 Campylobacter species (C. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2763180PMC
December 2002
31 Reads

Genes of periodontopathogens expressed during human disease.

Ann Periodontol 2002 Dec;7(1):38-42

Institute of Oral Bioscience and Department of Oral Microbiology, Chonbuk National University, Chonju, Korea.

Background: Since many bacterial genes are environmentally regulated, the screening for virulence-associated factors using classical genetic and molecular biology approaches can be biased under laboratory growth conditions of a given pathogen, because the required conditions for expression of many virulence factors may not occur during in vitro growth. Thus, technologies have been developed during the past several years to identify genes that are expressed during disease using animal models of human disease. However, animal models are not always truly representative of human disease, and with many pathogens, there is no appropriate animal model. Read More

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December 2002
2 Reads

Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide displays functionally diverse interactions with the innate host defense system.

Ann Periodontol 2002 Dec;7(1):29-37

Department of Periodontics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.

Periodontitis is a bacterially induced chronic inflammatory disease and a major cause of tooth loss in the world. The tissue damage and alveolar bone resorption characteristic of the disease are believed to be due to a destructive innate host response to a pathogenic subgingival biofilm. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative bacterium, is a member of this mixed microbial community that has been designated an etiologic agent of periodontitis. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1902/annals.2002.7.1.29
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December 2002
4 Reads

Subtractive cloning: new genes for studying inflammatory disorders.

Ann Periodontol 2002 Dec;7(1):17-28

Evrogen JSC; Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Moscow, Russia.

Understanding of the biology of interaction between pathogens and host is the central question in studying inflammatory disorders. Subtractive DNA cloning is one of the most efficient and comprehensive methods available for identifying eukaryotic genes regulated under specific physiological conditions, including inflammation and host response. Here we explore the utility of subtractive DNA cloning and describe suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based DNA subtraction method that has been developed and evolved in our labs over several years. Read More

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December 2002
6 Reads

Bacterial diversity in necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis in HIV-positive subjects.

Ann Periodontol 2002 Dec;7(1):8-16

Department of Molecular Genetics, The Forsyth Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Background: Necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis (NUP) is a painful and potentially debilitating affliction that affects about 2% to 6% of HIV-positive subjects. NUP may be caused by specific microorganisms that are presently unknown or by microbial species not usually thought to cause periodontal infections. The purpose of this study was to define the bacterial species associated with NUP in HIV-positive patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2002.7.1.8DOI Listing
December 2002
50 Reads

Bioinformatics and approaches to identifying polygenic susceptibility traits.

Authors:
Bruce S Weir

Ann Periodontol 2002 Dec;7(1):1-7

Bioinformatics Research Center, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7566, USA.

The role of genetic factors in periodontal disease is now well recognized, although details for the genetic mechanisms of the disease and implications for therapy can be as obscure as they are for other human traits. This paper addresses the role that the analysis of genome-wide data might play in helping to understand the molecular determinants of periodontal risk. Very few human diseases are not polygenic, in that an individual's susceptibility depends on his or her constitution at many genetic loci, each of which may have a small effect. Read More

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December 2002
2 Reads

Effect of maxillary sinus augmentation on the survival of endosseous dental implants. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):328-43

Department of Implant Dentistry, New York University, New York, New York, USA.

Background: Grafting the floor of the maxillary sinus has become the most common surgical intervention for increasing alveolar bone height prior to the placement of endosseous dental implants in the posterior maxilla. Outcomes of this procedure may be affected by specific surgical techniques, simultaneous versus delayed implant placement, use of barrier membranes over the lateral window, selection of graft material, and the surface characteristics and the length and width of the implants.

Rationale: The primary objective of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of the sinus augmentation procedure and compare the results achieved with various surgical techniques, grafting materials, and implants. Read More

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December 2003
39 Reads

Localized ridge augmentation/preservation. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):321-7

Department of Oral Medicine, Infection, and Immunity, Division of Periodontology, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Background: Osseointegrated implants have been documented as efficacious, however, their placement may be contraindicated in some patients due to insufficient bone volume. Techniques such as guided bone regeneration (GBR), immediate implantation, and distraction osteogenesis (DO) have been utilized as ridge enhancement therapies.

Rationale: This systematic review evaluates dental implant survival rates in patients treated with ridge augmentation or preservation techniques. Read More

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December 2003
4 Reads

Surgical therapies for the treatment of gingival recession. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):303-20

Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA.

Background: A variety of soft tissue augmentation procedures directed at root coverage have been documented in the literature utilizing autogenous or allogenic soft tissue grafting or guided tissue regeneration (GTR).

Rationale: The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the literature regarding the efficacies of various surgical gingival augmentation procedures relative to clinical and patient-oriented outcomes.

Focused Question: What is the effect of surgical therapy for root coverage in patients with gingival recession compared with other treatment modalities or baseline values?

Search Protocol: PubMed and the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register were searched to identify human studies in English investigating the therapeutic use of a soft tissue surgical procedure to treat gingival recession. Read More

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December 2003
6 Reads

Guided tissue regeneration for the treatment of periodontal intrabony and furcation defects. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):266-302

Department of Periodontics, College of Dental Surgery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.

Background: Many clinical studies have demonstrated that guided tissue regeneration (GTR) is a successful treatment modality of periodontal reconstructive surgery and it has become an accepted procedure in most periodontal practices.

Rationale: The purpose of this structured review was to assess the efficacy of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) procedures in patients with periodontal osseous defects compared with surgical controls on clinical, radiographic, adverse, and patient-centered outcomes. It extends the scope of previous GTR systematic reviews, which were limited to randomized controlled studies, by the scope of outcome measures examined, and the duration of the study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2003.8.1.266DOI Listing
December 2003
5 Reads

The efficacy of bone replacement grafts in the treatment of periodontal osseous defects. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):227-65

Department of Periodontics, Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Background: Bone replacement grafts (BRG) are widely used in the treatment of periodontal osseous defects; however, the clinical benefits of this therapeutic practice require further clarification through a systematic review of randomized controlled studies.

Rationale: The purpose of this systematic review is to access the efficacy of bone replacement grafts in proving demonstrable clinical improvements in periodontal osseous defects compared to surgical debridement alone.

Focused Question: What is the effect of bone replacement grafts compared to other interventions on clinical, radiographic, adverse, and patient-centered outcomes in patients with periodontal osseous defects?

Search Protocol: The computerized bibliographical databases MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from 1966 and 1974, respectively, to October 2002 for randomized controlled studies in which bone replacement grafts were compared to other surgical interventions in the treatment of periodontal osseous defects. Read More

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December 2003
50 Reads

Efficacy of chemical root surface modifiers in the treatment of periodontal disease. A systematic review.

Authors:
Angelo Mariotti

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):205-26

Section of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA.

Background: Periodontal regeneration has been a relentless goal of the periodontist. Perhaps the oldest and most frequently attempted type of regeneration has involved chemical modification of the root surface. Varying results from histological and clinical studies have created controversy about the clinical effectiveness of root surface decalcification. Read More

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December 2003

Growth and amelogenin-like factors in periodontal wound healing. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):193-204

Department of Periodontics/Prevention/Geriatrics, Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Background: Regeneration of tooth-supporting structures destroyed by periodontitis is a major goal of periodontal therapy. Periodontal tissue engineering utilizing growth and amelogenin-like factors (GAFs) applies advances in materials science and biology to regenerate alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and cementum. Amelogenin-like factors (e. Read More

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December 2003
1 Read

Microbial identification in the management of periodontal diseases. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):182-92

Department of Stomatology, University of California School of Dentistry, San Francisco, California, USA.

Background: Our understanding of the complexity of the oral microbiota continues to improve as new technologies, such as the analysis of 16S rRNA bacterial genes, are utilized. Despite the difficult of cataloguing all microorganisms and determining their pathogenic potential, some species, mostly members of the resident oral microbiota, have been identified as likely periodontal pathogens. However, for microbial diagnosis to be of value, it needs to affect disease diagnosis and/or treatment planning as well as result in superior treatment outcomes and/or provide an economic benefit to the patient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2003.8.1.182DOI Listing
December 2003
25 Reads

Systemic anti-infective periodontal therapy. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):115-81

Department of Periodontology, Forsyth Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Background: Periodontal diseases are infections and thus systemically administered antibiotics are often employed as adjuncts for their control. There are conflicting reports as to whether these agents provide a therapeutic benefit.

Rationale: The purpose of this systematic review is to determine whether systemically administered antibiotics improve a primary clinical outcome measure, periodontal attachment level change. Read More

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December 2003
1 Read

Local anti-infective therapy: mechanical and physical approaches. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):99-114

Department of Periodontics, Texas A&M University System Health Science Center-Baylor College of Dentistry, Dallas, Texas, USA.

Background: Although mechanical non-surgical therapy (scaling and root planing) is the most common means of initial treatment of periodontal diseases, the relative clinical efficacy of various methods, including manual versus machine-driven, with or without adjunctive agents, has not been determined.

Rationale: This systematic review analyzes the literature in an effort to identify the most effective therapies, based on both clinical and patient-centered outcomes.

Focused Question: In patients with periodontitis, what is the effect of mechanically-driven instrumentation (e. Read More

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December 2003
7 Reads

Local anti-infective therapy: pharmacological agents. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):79-98

Department of Periodontics, Medical College of Georgia, School of Dentistry, Augusta, GA 30912-1220, USA.

Background: It is well recognized that periodontal diseases are bacterial in nature. An essential component of therapy is to eliminate or control these pathogens. This has been traditionally accomplished through mechanical means (scaling and root planing [SRP]), which is time-consuming, difficult, and sometimes ineffective. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2003.8.1.79DOI Listing
December 2003
12 Reads

Periodontal disease as a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):70-8

Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA.

Background: Recent studies have implicated a variety of infections, including periodontal diseases, as risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes such as prematurity and low birth weight.

Rationale: A number of studies have shown that bacterial vaginosis is related to preterm and/or low birth weight (PT/LBW), which continues to be a significant cause of infant morbidity and mortality. It is also possible that other infectious processes, including periodontal diseases, contribute to PT/LBW. Read More

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December 2003
33 Reads

Associations between periodontal disease and risk for nosocomial bacterial pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):54-69

Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA.

Background: Several recent studies provide evidence that the oral cavity may influence the initiation and/or the progression of lung diseases such as pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Rationale: Studies have shown that poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease may foster colonization of the oropharyngeal region by respiratory pathogens, particularly in hospital or nursing home patients. If aspirated, these pathogens can cause pneumonia, one of the most common respiratory infections, especially in institutionalized subjects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2003.8.1.54DOI Listing
December 2003
2 Reads

Associations between periodontal disease and risk for atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, and stroke. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):38-53

Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA.

Background: Recent studies implicate exposure to systemic conditions involving chronic inflammation, including chronic periodontitis, in the etiology of atherosclerosis.

Rationale: A systematic review of the literature was conducted to assess the association between chronic inflammatory periodontal disease and atherosclerosis.

Focused Question: Does periodontal disease influence the initiation/progression of atherosclerosis and, therefore, cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD)?

Search Protocol: MEDLINE, pre-MEDLINE, MEDLINE Daily Update, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register were searched to identify human studies that related variables associated with atherosclerosis to periodontal disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2003.8.1.38DOI Listing
December 2003
1 Read

Periodontal host modulation with antiproteinase, anti-inflammatory, and bone-sparing agents. A systematic review.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):12-37

University of Alabama, Birmingham School of Dentistry, Department of Periodontology, Birmingham, Alabama, USA.

Background: The use of modulating agents, including inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) with antiproteinases, blocking production of proinflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins with anti-inflammatory drugs, and inhibiting activation of osteoclasts with bone-sparing agents, has been postulated to be of therapeutic value as an adjunctive therapy to the management of chronic periodontitis.

Rationale: The objective of this systematic review of the literature was to assess the adjunctive efficacy of antiproteinase, anti-inflammatory, and bone-sparing host-modulating agents in the treatment of gingivitis, aggressive periodontitis, and chronic periodontitis. FOCUSED QUESTIONS: 1. Read More

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December 2003
16 Reads

The use of the evidence-based approach in a periodontal therapy contemporary science workshop.

Ann Periodontol 2003 Dec;8(1):1-11

University of California Los Angeles, School of Dentistry, Section of Periodontics, Los Angeles, California, USA.

Background: When appropriately evaluated and carefully managed, the integration of emerging technology into practice can improve health and enhance the quality of life. Since the last American Academy of Periodontology Workshop in 1996, great technological advances in the areas of data access, retrieval, and management have been made. The World Wide Web has "exploded" with great possibilities for gathering data from many sources. Read More

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December 2003
1 Read

Bidirectional interrelationships between diabetes and periodontal diseases: an epidemiologic perspective.

Authors:
G W Taylor

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):99-112

Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences, and Endodontics, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

This review evaluates evidence for a bidirectional relationship between diabetes and periodontal diseases. A comprehensive Medline search of the post-1960 English language literature was employed to identify primary research reports of relationships between diabetes and periodontal diseases. Reports included in the review on the adverse effects of diabetes on periodontal health (DM-->PD) were restricted to those comparing periodontal health in subjects with and without diabetes. Read More

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December 2001
47 Reads

The relationship between periodontal diseases and diabetes: an overview.

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):91-8

Department of Periodontics, Hebrew University-Hadassah, Faculty of Dental Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel.

Diabetes mellitus, caused by the malfunction of insulin-dependent glucose and lipid metabolism, presents with the classical triad of symptoms: polydypsia, polyuria, and polyphagia which are often accompanied by chronic fatigue and loss of weight. Complications of diabetes mellitus include retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease. Periodontal diseases are infections affecting the periodontium and resulting in the loss of tooth support. Read More

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December 2001
1 Read

The association between periodontal diseases and cardiovascular diseases: a state-of-the-science review.

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):9-15

Comprehensive Center for Inflammatory Disorders, Center for Oral and Systemic Diseases, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Early case-control and cross-sectional studies demonstrating associations between chronic periodontitis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) were quickly followed by secondary analyses of data available from existing longitudinal studies, which indicated that individuals with periodontitis, as determined by clinical measures, were at greater risk for CVD events. Many of these studies contained large numbers of subjects and were adjusted for traditional risk factors. Within the last 18 months, one case-control study and one longitudinal study have reported finding positive associations that were not statistically significant. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.9DOI Listing
December 2001

Periodontitis and respiratory diseases: discussion, conclusions, and recommendations.

Authors:
R C Page

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):87-90

Department of Periodontics, Regional Clinical Dental Research Center, School of Dentistry, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.87DOI Listing
December 2001

Oral bacteria and respiratory infection: effects on respiratory pathogen adhesion and epithelial cell proinflammatory cytokine production.

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):78-86

Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.

Several microbiologic and epidemiologic studies have suggested an association between dental plaque, poor oral health, and respiratory diseases such as nosocomial pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A number of hypotheses are suggested to help explain how oral bacteria may participate in the pathogenesis of respiratory infection. Resident bacteria in oral secretions are likely aspirated along with respiratory pathogens and may affect the adhesion of the later organisms to the respiratory epithelium. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.78DOI Listing
December 2001

Epidemiologic associations between periodontal disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):71-7

VA Normative Aging Study, Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research & Information Center, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

The nature of the relationship of periodontal disease to a number of systemic health outcomes, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), remains unclear. Various causal mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observed epidemiologic associations between periodontal diseases and respiratory diseases. We have reviewed the epidemiologic and clinical evidence for this association. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.71DOI Listing
December 2001

The relationship between infections and chronic respiratory diseases: an overview.

Authors:
M S Terpenning

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):66-70

Department of Internal Medicine, Department of Veterans Affairs, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

This paper's goal is to review the relationship between infections and chronic respiratory disease, with particular reference to periodontal disease. The link between oral diseases in general, periodontal disease, and respiratory disease remains somewhat controversial. However, with cooperation between dentistry and medicine, the nature of the connection between dental and medical pathology can be better defined. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.66DOI Listing
December 2001

Candidate genes as potential links between periodontal and cardiovascular diseases.

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):48-57

Interleukin Genetics, Inc., Waltham, Massachusetts, USA.

Recent epidemiological associations between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease have led to a search for biological mechanisms that explain the associations. Genetic factors that influence biological processes involved in both diseases represent one of the potential mechanisms that may link periodontitis and cardiovascular disease. At present, several candidate genes have been investigated in one of the diseases but not the other. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.48DOI Listing
December 2001

Role for periodontal bacteria in cardiovascular diseases.

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):41-7

Department of Oral Biology, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.

Background: Several epidemiological studies as well as a recent animal model approach have suggested a role for periodontal diseases in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This relationship could be mediated by inflammatory responses induced by periodontal pathogens as well as direct interaction of these organisms with cardiac tissue.

Methods: In order to explore these possibilities, the effects of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis on cellular events proposed to play a role in CVD were investigated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.41DOI Listing
December 2001

The role of inflammatory and immunological mediators in periodontitis and cardiovascular disease.

Authors:
E De Nardin

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):30-40

Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.

Epidemiological studies have implicated periodontitis (PD) as a risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Persistent infections such as periodontitis induce inflammatory and immune responses which may contribute to coronary atherogenesis, and, in conjunction with other risk factors, may lead to coronary heart disease (CHD). In this review, mechanisms are described that may help explain the association between periodontal infections and CHD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.30DOI Listing
December 2001

Osteoporosis and periodontitis: discussion, conclusions, and recommendations.

Authors:
M S Reddy

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):214-7

Department of Periodontology, UAB School of Dentistry, Birmingham, Alabama, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.214DOI Listing
December 2001

The periodontal-systemic connection: implications for treatment of patients with osteoporosis and periodontal disease.

Authors:
E A Krall

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):209-13

Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research, Boston University Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Osteoporosis and osteopenia may influence periodontal disease and tooth loss. Medications such as hormone replacement therapy and nutritional supplements that are used to prevent or treat osteoporosis have been evaluated for beneficial effects on oral health in a small number of human studies. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT), which slows the rate of bone loss at skeletal sites such as the hip and spine, also appears to reduce the rate of alveolar bone loss in postmenopausal women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.209DOI Listing
December 2001
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Role of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) in inflammation, periodontitis, and atherogenesis.

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):20-9

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Atherosclerosis, the major cause of death and disability in the United States, is a chronic disease with inflammatory components. The first objective of this review is to explain how activation of NF-kappa B contributes to atherosclerosis. The second objective is to describe a potential link between inflammation, activation of NF-kappa B, and periodontitis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.20DOI Listing
December 2001

Periodontal diseases and osteoporosis: association and mechanisms.

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):197-208

Departments of Social and Preventive Medicine and Gynecology and Obstetrics, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.

There is increasing evidence that osteoporosis, and the underlying loss of bone mass characteristic of this disease, is associated with periodontal disease and tooth loss. Periodontitis has long been defined as an infection-mediated destruction of the alveolar bone and soft tissue attachment to the tooth, responsible for most tooth loss in adult populations. Current evidence including several prospective studies supports an association of osteoporosis with the onset and progression of periodontal disease in humans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.197DOI Listing
December 2001
2 Reads

The relationship between skeletal and oral bone mineral density: an overview.

Authors:
C H Chesnut

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):193-6

Department of Radiology and Medicine, Osteoporosis Research Group, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Is oral osteopenia (bone loss of the jaws) a component of systemic osteopenia/osteoporosis (systemic bone loss, with or without fracture) or only an accompanying manifestation of periodontal disease? Put other ways: 1) is systemic osteopenia a risk factor for periodontitis; 2) is systemic osteopenia a risk factor for oral osteopenia independent of periodontal disease; or 3) is periodontal disease the primary (exclusive) risk factor for oral osteopenia? Despite 2 decades of scientific inquiry into these questions, the answers remain elusive. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.193DOI Listing
December 2001
1 Read

Periodontal disease and pregnancy: discussion, conclusions, and recommendations.

Authors:
G C Armitage

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):189-92

Division of Periodontology, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.189DOI Listing
December 2001

Current evidence regarding periodontal disease as a risk factor in preterm birth.

Ann Periodontol 2001 Dec;6(1):183-8

Department of Periodontology, UAB School of Dentistry, Birmingham, Alabama, USA.

Preterm birth, resulting in babies born too little and too soon, is a major cause of morbidity. Evidence indicates that infections can be major risk factors in preterm birth. Case-control studies point to an association between periodontal infection and increased rates of preterm birth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/annals.2001.6.1.183DOI Listing
December 2001