3,277 results match your criteria Annals of epidemiology[Journal]


Where you live can impact your cancer risk: a look at multiple myeloma in New York City.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 15. Epub 2020 May 15.

Department of Population Health Science and Policy, The Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. Electronic address:

Purpose: To visualize variation in multiple myeloma (MM) incidence and mortality rates by race-ethnicity and geographic location and evaluate their correlation with neighborhood-level population covariates within New York City (NYC).

Methods: Trends and racial differences in MM incidence and mortality for the United States [Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Cancer Registry (SEER), National Center for Health Statistics], and NYC [New York State Cancer Registry] were compared using Joinpoint regression. Pearson's correlation coefficients measured neighborhood-level MM-covariate relationships (n = 34). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.05.005DOI Listing

Metabolic syndrome and P-wave duration in the American population.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Jun 25;46:5-11. Epub 2020 Apr 25.

Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock; Department of Biomedical Informatics, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock.

Purpose: Metabolic syndrome has a high prevalence in the United States. P-wave duration is a valuable indicator for atrial electrical conduction. Abnormalities in atrial electrical conduction can predispose to atrial fibrillation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.04.002DOI Listing

Prospective relationships between youth assets, negative life events, and binge drinking in a longitudinal cohort of the youth.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Jun 13;46:24-30. Epub 2020 May 13.

College of Education, University of Nevada, Reno, NV.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether individual, family, and community assets can 1) protect youth from binge drinking in the face of negative life events and 2) modify the relationship between negative life events and binge drinking.

Methods: Data from waves 2-5 of the Youth Asset Study were analyzed. Generalized estimating equations were used to assess the relationship between negative life events, assets, and binge drinking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.04.005DOI Listing

Body mass index, waist circumference, and mortality risks over 27 years of follow-up in old age.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Jun 11;46:20-23. Epub 2020 May 11.

Department of Psychology, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

Purpose: This study investigates the predictive effects of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) for all-cause mortality in old age over 27 years of follow-up.

Methods: Participants were from the Berlin Aging Study (n = 444, M ± SD = 84.55 ± 8. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.04.008DOI Listing

Gender and lung cancer-SEER-based analysis.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Jun 7;46:14-19. Epub 2020 May 7.

The Legacy Heritage Center & Dr. Larry Norton Institute, Soroka Medical Center, Be'er Sheva, Israel; Goldman Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Be'er Sheva, Israel. Electronic address:

Background: Lung cancer remains a major cause of death worldwide. While in the past it was considered to primarily afflict males, in recent decades the number of female patients has risen, such that rates among females are similar to those among males. Nevertheless, it has been found previously (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.04.003DOI Listing

The public health response to COVID-19: balancing precaution and unintended consequences.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 06 8;46:12-13. Epub 2020 May 8.

Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.05.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7207121PMC

Ensuring ethical data access: the Sierra Leone Ebola Database (SLED) model.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Jun 10;46:1-4. Epub 2020 Apr 10.

Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, ICAP, Sierra Leone Ebola Database (SLED) Data Team, Freetown, Sierra Leone.

Purpose: Organizations responding to the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone collected information from multiple sources and kept it in separate databases, including distinct data systems for Ebola hot line calls, patient information collected by field surveillance officers, laboratory testing results, clinical information from Ebola treatment and isolation facilities, and burial team records.

Methods: After the conclusion of the epidemic, the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation and the U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.04.001DOI Listing

Depressive symptoms do not discriminate: racial and economic influences between time-varying depressive symptoms and mortality among REGARDS participants.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Jun 7;46:31-40.e2. Epub 2020 May 7.

Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY; Columbia University Medical Center, Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health, New York, NY. Electronic address:

Purpose: Depressive symptoms relapse and remit over time, perhaps differentially by race and income. Few studies have examined whether time-varying depressive symptoms (TVDS) differentially predict mortality. We sought to determine whether race (white/black) and income (Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.04.004DOI Listing

Identifying demographic and health profiles of young adults with frequent jail incarceration in New York City during 2011-2017.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Jun 7;46:41-48.e1. Epub 2020 May 7.

Correctional Health Services, New York City Health + Hospitals, New York, NY.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate incarceration patterns among young adults in New York City jails from mid-2011 through 2017, with an aim that identification of frequently incarcerated young "hot spotters" may inform early interventions.

Methods: We examined electronic health records for 3114 individuals with no known prior jail admission and admitted within 4.5 years after turning age 18 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.04.006DOI Listing

Maternal prepregnancy BMI and size at birth: race/ethnicity-stratified, within-family associations in over 500,000 siblings.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Jun 7;46:49-56.e5. Epub 2020 May 7.

Oregon Health & Science University, School of Public Health, Portland, OR; Oregon Health & Science University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Portland, OR.

Purpose: To estimate racial/ethnic-stratified effects of maternal prepregnancy BMI on size for gestational age at birth, by comparing siblings within families.

Methods: This study examined linked vital statistics and patient discharge data from 580,960 infants born to 278,770 women in the State of California (2007-2012). To control for family-level confounding, we used fixed effects multinomial regression, modeling size for gestational age (small [SGA], appropriate, large [LGA]) as a function of maternal BMI (underweight, normal weight, overweight, obesity class I, II, III) and time-varying covariates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.04.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7315911PMC

Lung cancer mortality among never-smokers in the United States: estimating smoking-attributable mortality with nationally representative data.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 3;45:5-11. Epub 2020 Apr 3.

Department of Sociology, Population Program, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder.

Purpose: Lung cancer mortality among never-smokers is an often overlooked yet important cause of adult mortality. Moreover, indirect approaches for estimating smoking-attributable mortality use never-smoker lung cancer death rates to approximate smoking burden. To date, though, most studies using indirect approaches import rates from the Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II), which is not representative of the U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.03.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7250145PMC

Trends over time in HIV prevalence among people who inject drugs in 89 large US metropolitan statistical areas, 1992-2013.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 3;45:12-23. Epub 2020 Apr 3.

Institute for Infectious Disease Research, National Development and Research Institutes, New York, NY; Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York.

Purpose: After years of stable or declining HIV prevalence and declining incidence among people who inject drugs (PWID) in the United States, some rapidly emerging outbreaks have recently occurred in new areas (e.g., Scott County, Indiana). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.03.011DOI Listing

Parent versus child report of children's sexual orientation: associations with psychiatric morbidity in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 2;45:1-4. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT.

Purpose: We sought to document the association between parent's report and their child's report of the child's sexual orientation and associations between this agreement/disagreement and the child's psychiatric morbidity.

Methods: Data were drawn from 11,565 parent-child dyads who completed the baseline assessment of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study (2016-2018; children ages 9-10 years). Whether the child was "gay or bisexual" was asked separately of parent and child. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.03.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7245580PMC

Age-specific cancer rates: a bird's-eye view on progress.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 6. Epub 2020 May 6.

Unit of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Biodemography, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; Interdisciplinary Centre on Population Dynamics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Purpose: We aim to shed light on progress in cancer medicine through studying time trends in age-specific rates of cancer incidence and mortality over the last quarter century.

Methods: We analyzed age-specific incidence and mortality rates of all cancer sites combined using the high-quality population-based databases of Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, and the Netherlands for the period 1990-2016.

Results: Over these 26 years, cancer incidence rates increased in all investigated countries irrespective of age by about 22%. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.04.007DOI Listing

Assessing Differential Impacts of COVID-19 on Black Communities.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 14. Epub 2020 May 14.

Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

Purpose: Given incomplete data reporting by race, we used data on COVID-19 cases and deaths in US counties to describe racial disparities in COVID-19 disease and death and associated determinants.

Methods: Using publicly available data (accessed April 13, 2020), predictors of COVID-19 cases and deaths were compared between disproportionately (>13%) black and all other (<13% black) counties. Rate ratios were calculated and population attributable fractions (PAF) were estimated using COVID-19 cases and deaths via zero-inflated negative binomial regression model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.05.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7224670PMC
May 2020
2.000 Impact Factor

Understanding COVID-19 Risks and Vulnerabilities among Black Communities in America: The Lethal Force of Syndemics.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 14. Epub 2020 May 14.

Center for Public Health and Human Rights, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Black communities in the United States are bearing the brunt of the COVID-19 pandemic and the underlying conditions that exacerbate its negative consequences. Syndemic theory provides a useful framework for understanding how such interacting epidemics to develop under conditions of health and social disparity. Multiple historical and present-day factors have created the syndemic conditions within which Black Americans experience the lethal force of COVID-19. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.05.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7224650PMC

Survival advantage of cohort participation attenuates over time: results from three long-standing community-based studies.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 3;45:40-46.e4. Epub 2020 Apr 3.

Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

Purpose: Cohort participants usually have lower mortality rates than nonparticipants, but it is unclear if this survival advantage decreases or increases as cohort studies age.

Methods: We used a 1975 private census of Washington County, Maryland, to compare mortality among cohort participants to nonparticipants for three cohorts, Campaign Against Cancer and Stroke (CLUE I), Campaign Against Cancer and Heart Disease (CLUE II), and Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities (ARIC) initiated in 1974, 1989, and 1986, respectively. We analyzed mortality risk using time-truncated Cox regression models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.03.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7294871PMC

The unequal distribution of sibling and parent deaths by race and its effect on attaining a college degree.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 3;45:76-82.e1. Epub 2020 Apr 3.

Division of Epidemiology & Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

Purpose: Examine (1) the distribution of experiencing the death of a parent or sibling (family death) by race/ethnicity and (2) how a family death affects attaining a college degree.

Methods: Participants (n = 8984) were from National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 aged 13-17 at baseline in 1997 and 29-32 in 2013. We examined the prevalence of family deaths by age group and race/ethnicity and used covariate-adjusted logistic regression to assess the relationship between a family death and college degree attainment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.03.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7245560PMC

Associations between perceived everyday discrimination, discrimination attributions, and binge eating among Latinas: results from the National Latino and Asian American Study.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 2;45:32-39. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester.

Purpose: The aim of the study was to quantify the association between perceived everyday discrimination and binge eating among Latinas in the United States.

Methods: Participants included 1014 Latinas from the 2002-2003 National Latino and Asian American Study. Modified Poisson models with robust standard errors were used to estimate sociodemographic-adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of binge eating associated with overall and attribution-specific discrimination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.03.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7329263PMC

The role of comorbidity in the association of obesity with unemployment and disability.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 2;45:61-68. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Université de Paris, INSERM U1266, Paris, France; Department of Psychiatry, AP-HP, Louis Mourier Hospital, Colombes, France.

Purpose: The association of obesity with a large range of physical conditions and numerous psychiatric disorders has been extensively studied. Our study sought the extent to which physical conditions or psychiatric disorders associated with obesity mediate the association of obesity with unemployment or disability.

Methods: Using data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III (NESARC-III, 2012-2013), we estimated the prevalence of unemployment as a function of obesity taking into account these comorbidities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.03.004DOI Listing

Widowhood and mortality: gender, race/ethnicity, and the role of economic resources.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 8;45:69-75.e1. Epub 2020 Apr 8.

Population Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin.

Purpose: We examine widowhood effects on mortality across gender and race-ethnicity, with attention to variation in the mediating role of economic resources.

Methods: Data were drawn from the Health and Retirement Study (1992-2016). The analytic sample included 34,777 respondents aged 51 years and older who contributed 208,470 person-period records. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.02.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7304506PMC

Policy- and county-level associations with HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis use, the United States, 2018.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 3;45:24-31.e3. Epub 2020 Apr 3.

Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.

Purpose: HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is highly efficacious, and yet most individuals indicated for it are not currently using it. To provide guidance for health policymakers, researchers, and community advocates, we developed county-level PrEP use estimates and assessed locality and policy associations.

Methods: Using data from a national aggregator, we applied a validated crosswalk procedure to generate county-level estimates of PrEP users in 2018. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.03.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7246022PMC
May 2020
2.000 Impact Factor

The tipping point: could increasing the subminimum wage reduce poverty-related antenatal stressors in U.S. women?

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 6;45:47-53.e6. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

OHSU-PSU School of Public Health, Portland, OR.

Purpose: Tipped workers, primarily women of reproductive-age, can be paid a "subminimum wage" 71% lower than the federal minimum wage, contributing to economic hardship. Poverty-related antenatal stress has deleterious health effects for women and their children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing the state-level subminimum wage (currently $2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.03.007DOI Listing

Postrelease mortality among persons hospitalized during their incarceration.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 May 2;45:54-60. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Center for Health Equity Research, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill; Department of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill.

Purpose: Health and mortality of people released from incarceration have received increased attention, and yet little is known about the postrelease experiences of those hospitalized during incarceration.

Methods: For persons incarcerated and released from the North Carolina (NC) state prison system between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2015, we examined postrelease mortality from 2008 to 2016 by history of prison hospitalization.

Results: Among 111,479 released persons, 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.03.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7245541PMC

Evaluating statewide HIV preexposure prophylaxis implementation using All-Payer Claims Data.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Apr 26;44:1-7.e2. Epub 2020 Mar 26.

Rhode Island Department of Health, Providence, RI; Department of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI.

Purpose: Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in the form of daily emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF) is effective for preventing HIV infection. Implementation has been limited by an inability to systematically evaluate uptake and use. All-Payer Claims Databases (APCDs) provide an opportunity to evaluate population-level PrEP implementation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.03.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7252205PMC
April 2020
2.000 Impact Factor

Empirical comparison of approaches for odds ratios to risk ratio transformations in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials with common outcomes.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Apr 26;44:57-59.e3. Epub 2020 Mar 26.

Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.03.005DOI Listing

Human psittacosis in Japan: notification trends and differences in infection source and age distribution by gender, 2007 to 2016.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Apr 25;44:60-63. Epub 2020 Mar 25.

Infectious Disease Surveillance Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan.

Purpose: Psittacosis is a bacterial zoonosis caused by Chlamydia (Chlamydophila) psittaci that infects birds. Although potentially fatal, infections can be reduced by controlling the source of infection. We therefore described the epidemiology of psittacosis, focusing on the infection source. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.03.001DOI Listing

Burden of atrial fibrillation and stroke risk among octagenarian and nonagenarian women in Australia.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Apr 3;44:31-37.e2. Epub 2020 Mar 3.

Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.

Purpose: To determine the prevalence and incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) among older Australian women from 2000 to 2015, determine factors associated with AF, and to calculate risk of stroke at the time of AF diagnosis.

Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of 6671 women of the 1921-1926 birth cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, linked to data from hospital admissions to identify AF and National Death Index to determine date of death. Yearly prevalence and incidence proportions of AF, and stroke risk using CHADS-VA scheme, were calculated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.02.004DOI Listing

Household food insecurity and antepartum depression in the National Children's Study.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Apr 28;44:38-44.e1. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Indiana University, Bloomington.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the association between household food insecurity (HFI) and elevated antepartum depressive symptoms (EADS) in the National Children's Study, 2009-2014, as well as standardize our results to the U.S. pregnant population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.01.010DOI Listing

Dynamic prediction and prognostic analysis of patients with cervical cancer: a landmarking analysis approach.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Apr 4;44:45-51. Epub 2020 Mar 4.

Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health (Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Research), Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, P.R. China. Electronic address:

Purpose: Providing up-to-date information on patient prognosis is important in determining the optimal treatment strategies. The currently available prediction models, such as the Cox model, are limited to making predictions from baseline and do not consider the time-varying effects of covariates.

Methods: A total of 1501 cervical cancer patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.01.009DOI Listing

Cholesterol-lowering effect of statin therapy in a clinical HIV cohort: an application of double propensity score adjustment.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Apr 2;44:8-15. Epub 2020 Mar 2.

Department of Epidemiology, Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University, Washington, DC.

Purpose: Propensity score matching (PSM) is often used to estimate the average treatment effect among the treated (ATT) using observational data. We demonstrate how the use of "double propensity score adjustment" can reduce residual confounding and avoid bias due to incomplete matching compared with traditional PSM methods.

Methods: The DC Cohort is an observational clinical HIV cohort in Washington, DC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.02.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7190432PMC

Neighborhood-level measures of socioeconomic status are more correlated with individual-level measures in urban areas compared with less urban areas.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 03 11;43:37-43.e4. Epub 2020 Feb 11.

Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Electronic address:

Purpose: We tested the hypothesis that individual- and neighborhood-level measures of socioeconomic status (SES) are more concordant in urban than rural areas, and we used the previously established association between obesity and self-rated health to illustrate the effect of residual confounding by individual-level SES when only neighborhood-level SES is considered.

Methods: Using data from two population-based surveys, we calculated Spearman's rank correlations between household income and neighborhood socioeconomic advantage across eight Pennsylvania counties. We applied multivariable Poisson regression models with robust variance estimates to estimate the degree to which individual SES confounds the association between obesity and self-rated health when the analysis accounts for neighborhood SES only, and we examined how this confounding varied by county urbanicity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.01.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7160852PMC

Challenges and opportunities related to the objective assessment of physical activity within U.S. health surveys.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 03 26;43:1-10. Epub 2020 Feb 26.

The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies, Knoxville, TN.

Public health surveillance is a vital component in the assessment of health-related behaviors such as physical activity (PA). With multiple active national health surveys in the United States, questions arise about how data are collected, what each data source contributes to the overall knowledge base about PA and health outcomes, and how to interpret PA data from different data sources to gain an understanding about PA at the population level. This article highlights specifically the challenges and opportunities with using wearable devices in population-level PA assessment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.01.011DOI Listing

Is wealth associated with depressive symptoms in the United States?

Ann Epidemiol 2020 03 8;43:25-31.e1. Epub 2020 Feb 8.

Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Purpose: The aim of the study was to assess the relation between family wealth and depression in U.S. adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.02.001DOI Listing

Estimating the size of HIV-negative MSM population that would benefit from pre-exposure prophylaxis in Florida.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Apr 14;44:52-56. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Department of Epidemiology, Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work, Florida International University, Miami; Research Center in Minority Institutions, Florida International University, Miami.

Purpose: This study aimed to estimate the size of the population of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Florida with high-risk behaviors that would indicate eligibility for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) use.

Methods: Three methods were used to estimate the MSM population. Estimates from the three methods were averaged, and the number of MSM living with HIV in each zone improvement plan (ZIP) code was subtracted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.02.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7190453PMC

Timing of parental incarceration and allostatic load: a developmental life course approach.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 03 14;43:18-24. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Department of Sociology, University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade Taipa, Macau, China.

Purpose: We examined whether the timing of when a person experienced the loss of a parent to incarceration was significantly associated with allostatic load, a multisystem index of biological dysregulation.

Methods: Data were drawn from waves I and IV of National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, a nationally representative sample of adolescents in 1994. The final analytic sample was restricted to responses with valid responses and valid sampling weights (n = 13,365). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.02.002DOI Listing

Life-course impact of child maltreatment on midlife health-related quality of life in women: longitudinal mediation analysis for potential pathways.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 03 18;43:58-65. Epub 2020 Jan 18.

Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Purpose: We examined (1) if child maltreatment (CM) is associated with lower health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and fewer quality-adjusted life years (QALY) over a 9-year follow-up of midlife women and (2) if adulthood psychosocial mediators could explain these associations.

Methods: Women (n = 342) completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Longitudinal HRQoL and QALY outcomes measured at five study visits include 36-item Short-Form Health Survey mental component score and physical component score and the Short Form-6 Dimension health index. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.01.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7153694PMC

Quantitative bias analysis for study and grant planning.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 03 11;43:32-36. Epub 2020 Feb 11.

Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.

Purpose: Epidemiologists often think about the balance between study error and cost-efficiency in terms of study design and strategies to reduce random error. We less often consider cost-efficiencies in terms of dealing with systematic errors that arise within a study, such as in deciding how to measure study variables and misclassification implications.

Methods: Given the information used to inform a study size calculation, the expected study data can be simulated during study planning, and the impact of anticipated biases can be estimated using quantitative bias analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.01.013DOI Listing

Smoking levels and associations between sociodemographic factors and smoking continuation in U.S. stroke survivors.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 03 21;43:66-70. Epub 2020 Jan 21.

Deparment of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Purpose: Although stroke survivors who continue smoking face increased risk for subsequent strokes, little is known about U.S. poststroke smoking patterns. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.01.007DOI Listing

Methods for county-level estimation of pre-exposure prophylaxis coverage and application to the U.S. Ending the HIV Epidemic jurisdictions.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 Apr 13;44:16-30. Epub 2020 Jan 13.

Department of Behavioral Science and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.

Purpose: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a pillar of the US Department of Health and Human Services "Ending the HIV Epidemic" (EHE) initiative in 50 EHE jurisdictions (48 U.S. counties and two U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.01.004DOI Listing
April 2020
2.000 Impact Factor

Variability in sociodemographic factors and obesity in Korean children: a cross-sectional analysis of Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination survey data (2007-2015).

Ann Epidemiol 2020 03 11;43:51-57. Epub 2020 Jan 11.

Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon, South Korea. Electronic address:

Purpose: Sociodemographic factors are well-known risk factors for childhood obesity, even though the relationship between sociodemographic factors and obesity varies among countries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between sociodemographic factors and obesity in Korean children.

Methods: This study is an analysis of cross-sectional data from the 2007-2009, 2010-2012, and 2013-2015 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.01.006DOI Listing

Childhood BMI and the occurrence of respiratory disease-related hospital admissions or death in adulthood: the Busselton Health Study.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 02 11;42:19-24.e2. Epub 2020 Jan 11.

Medical School, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; Department of Pulmonary Physiology and Sleep Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia.

Purpose: Few studies have investigated the association of childhood obesity with respiratory disease-related outcomes in adulthood and findings are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of body mass index (BMI) in childhood with the occurrence of respiratory events in adulthood.

Methods: We analyzed a cohort of 4537 school-aged children who attended the Busselton Health Study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.01.002DOI Listing
February 2020

Probabilistic sensitivity analysis: gestational hypertension and differentially misclassified maternal smoking during pregnancy.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 02 13;42:1-3.e1. Epub 2020 Jan 13.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA; Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.01.001DOI Listing
February 2020
2.000 Impact Factor

Discrimination, social support, and telomere length: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

Ann Epidemiol 2020 02 31;42:58-63.e2. Epub 2019 Dec 31.

Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.

Purpose: We sought to assess the association of reports of discrimination with leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and effect measure modification by social support.

Methods: This study used data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Stress Ancillary Study (n = 1153). Discrimination was measured using the everyday discrimination and the major experiences of discrimination scales. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2019.12.009DOI Listing
February 2020

How much do preventive health behaviors explain education- and income-related inequalities in health? Results of Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition analysis.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 03 22;43:44-50. Epub 2020 Jan 22.

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard. T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Purpose: Five health practices are recognized to be essential for the prevention of chronic disease, viz. avoiding smoking, drinking in moderation, healthy diet, regular physical activity, and adequate sleep. However, how much of these behaviors contribute to socioeconomic disparities in health continues to be debated-some claim "hardly any," while others say "nearly all. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.01.008DOI Listing

Excess body weight, cigarette smoking, and type II diabetes incidence in the national FINRISK studies.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 02 9;42:12-18. Epub 2020 Jan 9.

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Purpose: We identify the individual and joint contributions of excess weight and cigarette smoking to national-level type II diabetes (T2D) incidence and to educational and gender disparities therein filling an important gap in T2D epidemiology.

Methods: Based on the FINRISK surveys conducted in 1997, 2002, and 2007 and linked to the Finnish National Drug Reimbursement Register through 2011, we used a regression-counterfactual approach to estimate the percentage of diagnosed drug-treated incident T2D cases attributable to excess body weight and cigarette smoking. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were evaluated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2019.12.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7231607PMC
February 2020

Gestational vitamin D and offspring risk of multiple sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 03 3;43:11-17. Epub 2020 Jan 3.

Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.

Purpose: Our objective was to systematically review and meta-analyze studies that assessed the association between gestational vitamin D levels and risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) in offspring.

Methods: Embase and Pubmed databases were searched from inception to May 2018. Original, observational studies that investigated both clinically defined MS (in offspring) and vitamin D levels in utero or shortly after birth were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2019.12.010DOI Listing

Risk of advanced chronic kidney disease among adults with spina bifida.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 03 10;43:71-74.e1. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

Purpose: Adults with spina bifida (SB) may be susceptible to accelerated progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) to advanced stages. However, little is known regarding risk of advanced CKD for this underserved population. The objective was to estimate the risk of advanced CKD among adults with vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.01.003DOI Listing

Elucidating the role of overweight and obesity in racial and ethnic disparities in cesarean delivery risk.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 02 7;42:4-11.e4. Epub 2020 Jan 7.

Department of Population Health Science and Policy and the Blavatnik Family Women's Health Research Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI.

Purpose: We aimed to quantify the extent to which overweight and obesity explain cesarean delivery risk among women of different racial and ethnic backgrounds.

Methods: Using administrative records for 216,481 singleton, nulliparous births in New York City from 2008 to 2013, we calculated risk ratios, risk differences, and population attributable fractions for associations between body mass index (BMI) and cesarean, stratified by race and ethnicity.

Results: The population attributable fraction (95% confidence interval) for BMI was 6. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2019.12.012DOI Listing
February 2020

The association of prediagnosis social support with survival after heart failure in the Cardiovascular Health Study.

Ann Epidemiol 2020 02 9;42:73-77. Epub 2020 Jan 9.

School of Biological & Population Health Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis; Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Stanford University, Stanford, CA. Electronic address:

Purpose: Although social support has been shown to be associated with survival among persons with cardiovascular disease, little research has focused on whether social support, measured before the onset of heart failure, can enhance survival after diagnosis. The objective of this study was to assess the association between prediagnosis social support and postdiagnosis survival among older adults with heart failure.

Methods: We obtained the data from the Cardiovascular Health Study, which included noninstitutionalized adults aged 65 years or older from four sites in the United States with primary enrollment in 1989-1990. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2019.12.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7060020PMC
February 2020