32 results match your criteria Annals Of The Association Of American Geographers[Journal]

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What Drives Indirect Land Use Change? How Brazil's Agriculture Sector Influences Frontier Deforestation.

Authors:
Peter Richards

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2015 Sep 18;105(5):1026-1040. Epub 2015 Aug 18.

Population and Studies Training Center, Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, Brown University.

From 2000-2005 high returns to soybeans set off an unprecedented expansion of agricultural production across Brazil. The expansion occurred concurrently to a sharp rise in deforestation, leading academics and policy makers to question the extent and means by which the growing agricultural sector was driving regional forest loss. In this article we consider and question the underlying drivers of indirect land use change, namely the potential impact of soybean expansion on beef prices and of land use displacement, via migration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2015.1060924DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4789281PMC
September 2015

Where Deforestation Leads to Urbanization: How Resource Extraction is Leading to Urban Growth in the Brazilian Amazon.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2015 Jul 20;105(4):806-823. Epub 2015 Jul 20.

Department of Sociology, Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, Population Studies and Training Center, Brown University, office), Fax 401-863-3839.

Developing the Amazon into a major provider of internationally traded mineral and food commodities has dramatically transformed broad expanses of tropical forests to farm and pasturelands, and to mining sites. The environmental impacts of this transformation, as well as the drivers underlying the process, have already been well documented. In this article we turn our analytical lenses to another, less examined effect of Amazon land use and environmental change, namely the creation and development of new urban areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2015.1052337DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4789292PMC

Genetic GIScience: Toward a Place-Based Synthesis of the Genome, Exposome, and Behavome.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2015;105(3):454-472

Department of Geography, University at Buffalo-State University of New York.

The exposome, defined as the totality of an individual's exposures over the life course, is a seminal concept in the environmental health sciences. Although inherently geographic, the exposome as yet is unfamiliar to many geographers. This article proposes a place-based synthesis, genetic geographic information science (Genetic GISc) that is founded on the exposome, genome+ and behavome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2015.1018777DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4554694PMC
January 2015
1 Read

Dasymetric Modeling and Uncertainty.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2014 Jan;104(1):80-95

Department of Geography, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309.

Dasymetric models increase the spatial resolution of population data by incorporating related ancillary data layers. The role of uncertainty in dasymetric modeling has not been fully addressed as of yet. Uncertainty is usually present because most population data are themselves uncertain, and/or the geographic processes that connect population and the ancillary data layers are not precisely known. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2013.843439DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4109831PMC
January 2014
1 Read

Modeling Social Ties and Household Mobility.

Authors:
Sara S Metcalf

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2014 Jan;104(1):40-59

Department of Geography, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14261 USA.

Underlying the aggregate phenomena of persistent problems such as urban sprawl and spatial socio-economic disparity is the individual choice of where to live. This study develops an agent-based model to simulate social and economic influences on neighborhood choice. With Danville, Illinois as an empirical context, a pattern-oriented approach is employed to examine the role of social ties in shaping intra-urban household mobility. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2013.846152DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4096934PMC
January 2014
7 Reads

Studying Displacement After a Disaster Using Large Scale Survey Methods: Sumatra After the 2004 Tsunami.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2014 Jan;104(3):594-612

Department of Economics, Duke University.

Understanding of human vulnerability to environmental change has advanced in recent years, but measuring vulnerability and interpreting mobility across many sites differentially affected by change remains a significant challenge. Drawing on longitudinal data collected on the same respondents who were living in coastal areas of Indonesia before the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and were re-interviewed after the tsunami, this paper illustrates how the combination of population-based survey methods, satellite imagery and multivariate statistical analyses has the potential to provide new insights into vulnerability, mobility and impacts of major disasters on population well-being. The data are used to map and analyze vulnerability to post-tsunami displacement across the provinces of Aceh and North Sumatra and to compare patterns of migration after the tsunami between damaged areas and areas not directly affected by the tsunami. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4019446PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2014.892351DOI Listing
January 2014
2 Reads

Genetics: A New Landscape for Medical Geography.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2013 ;103(6):1452-1467

Department of Geography, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

The emergence and re-emergence of human pathogens resistant to medical treatment will present a challenge to the international public health community in the coming decades. Geography is uniquely positioned to examine the progressive evolution of pathogens across space and through time, and to link molecular change to interactions between population and environmental drivers. Landscape as an organizing principle for the integration of natural and cultural forces has a long history in geography, and, more specifically, in medical geography. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2013.784102DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3928082PMC
January 2013

A Place-Oriented, Mixed-Level Regionalization Method for Constructing Geographic Areas in Health Data Dissemination and Analysis.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2014;105(1):48-66

Louisiana Tumor Registry, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center.

Similar geographic areas often have great variations in population size. In health data management and analysis, it is desirable to obtain regions of comparable population by decomposing areas of large population (to gain more spatial variability) and merging areas of small population (to mask privacy of data). Based on the Peano curve algorithm and modified scale-space clustering, this research proposes a mixed-level regionalization (MLR) method to construct geographic areas with comparable population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2014.968910DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4523277PMC
January 2014
5 Reads

Land Suitability Modeling using a Geographic Socio-Environmental Niche-Based Approach: A Case Study from Northeastern Thailand.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2013 Jan;103(4)

Department of Geography, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ; Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Understanding the pattern-process relations of land use/land cover change is an important area of research that provides key insights into human-environment interactions. The suitability or likelihood of occurrence of land use such as agricultural crop types across a human-managed landscape is a central consideration. Recent advances in niche-based, geographic species distribution modeling (SDM) offer a novel approach to understanding land suitability and land use decisions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2012.702479DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3811970PMC
January 2013
1 Read

An examination of spatial concentrations of sex exchange and sex exchange norms among drug users in Baltimore, Maryland.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2012 09 15;102(5):1058-1066. Epub 2012 May 15.

Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2213 McElderry Street, Second floor, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, 410-502-5368, 410-502-5385 (fax).

Baltimore, Maryland consistently ranks highest nationally in rates of sexually transmitted diseases and HIV infection. Prior studies have identified geographic areas where STI and HIV infection in the city is most prevalent. It is well established that sex exchange behavior is associated with HIV and STIs, yet it is not well understood how sex exchangers are spatially distributed within the high-risk areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2012.674902DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3636531PMC
September 2012
2 Reads

Measurement, Optimization, and Impact of Health Care Accessibility: A Methodological Review.

Authors:
Fahui Wang

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2012 27;102(5):1104-1112. Epub 2012 Mar 27.

Department of Geography & Anthropology, Louisiana State University.

Despite spending more than any other nation on medical care per person, the United States ranks behind other industrialized nations in key health performance measures. A main cause is the deep disparities in access to care and health outcomes. Federal programs such as the designations of Medically Underserved Areas/Populations and Health Professional Shortage Areas are designed to boost the number of health professionals serving these areas and to help alleviate the access problem. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2012.657146DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3547595PMC

Using High-Resolution Population Data to Identify Neighborhoods and Establish Their Boundaries.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2013 Jan 20;103(1):67-84. Epub 2012 Jun 20.

University of Colorado at Boulder, Department of Geography ; Brown University, Spatial Structures in the Social Sciences (S4).

Neighborhoods are about local territory, but what territory? This paper offers one approach to this question through a novel application of "local" spatial statistics. We conceptualize a neighborhood in terms of both space and social composition; it is a contiguous territory defined by a bundle of social attributes that distinguish it from surrounding areas. Our method does not impose either a specific social characteristic or a predetermined spatial scale to define a neighborhood. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00045608.2012.685
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2012.685049DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3532850PMC
January 2013
7 Reads

Space-time Integration in GIScience and Geography.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2013 ;103(5):1062-1071

Association of American Geographers.

Space-time integration has long been the topic of study and speculation in geography. However, in recent years an entirely new form of space-time integration has become possible in GIS and GIScience: integration and interaction. While real-time spatiotemporal data is now being generated almost ubiquitously, and its applications in research and commerce are widespread and rapidly accelerating, the ability to continuously create and interact with fused space-time data in geography and GIScience is a recent phenomenon, made possible by the invention and development of real-time interactive (RTI) GPS/GIS technology and functionality in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2013.792172DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3935343PMC
January 2013
6 Reads

Moving Neighborhoods and Health Research Forward: Using Geographic Methods to Examine the Role of Spatial Scale in Neighborhood Effects on Health.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2012 Sep 3;102(5):986-995. Epub 2012 Apr 3.

Department of Geography and Institute of Behavioral Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder.

A rich history of research documents the effects of neighborhood-level socioeconomic status (SES) conditions on health outcomes. Recent criticism of the neighborhoods and health literature, however, has stressed several conceptual and methodological challenges not adequately addressed in previous research. Critics suggest that early work on neighborhoods and health gave little thought to the spatial scale at which SES factors influence a specific health outcome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2012.659621DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3527100PMC
September 2012

U.S. Migration, Translocality, and the Acceleration of the Nutrition Transition in Mexico.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2012 Sep 3;102(5):1209-1218. Epub 2012 Apr 3.

Department of Geography and Population Program University of Colorado at Boulder.

Migrant flows are generally accompanied by extensive social, economic, and cultural links between origins and destinations, transforming the former's community life, livelihoods, and local practices. Previous studies have found a positive association between these translocal ties and better child health and nutrition. We contend that focusing on children only provides a partial view of a larger process affecting community health, accelerating the nutrition transition in particular. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2012.659629DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3435101PMC
September 2012

Agents of Change: Mixed-Race Households and the Dynamics of Neighborhood Segregation in the United States.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2012 May;102(3):549-570

Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology, University of Washington.

This article explores the effects of mixed-race household formation on trends in neighborhood-scale racial segregation. Census data show that these effects are nontrivial in relation to the magnitude of decadal changes in residential segregation. An agent-based model illustrates the potential long-run impacts of rising numbers of mixed-race households on measures of neighborhood-scale segregation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2011.627057DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4114078PMC

Spatial-temporal Analysis of Cancer Risk in Epidemiologic Studies with Residential Histories.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2012 26;102(5):1049-1052. Epub 2012 Apr 26.

Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Address: 1518 Clifton Road NE; Atlanta, GA 30322, Telephone: (404) 727-1057.

Exploring spatial-temporal patterns of disease incidence identifies areas of significantly elevated risk and can lead to discoveries of disease risk factors. One popular way to investigate patterns in risk over space and time is spatial-temporal cluster detection analysis. The identification of significant clusters may lead to etiological hypotheses to explain the pattern of elevated risk and to additional epidemiologic studies to explore these hypotheses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2012.671131DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450537PMC
April 2012
1 Read

Climate Change and Risk Projection: Dynamic Spatial Models of Tsetse and African Trypanosomiasis in Kenya.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2012;102(2):1038-1048

Department of Entomology and Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University.

African trypanosomiasis, otherwise known as in humans and in animals, is a parasitic protist passed cyclically by the tsetse fly. Despite more than a century of control and eradication efforts, the fly remains widely distributed across Africa and coextensive with other prevalent diseases. Control and planning are hampered by spatially and temporally variant vector distributions, ecologically irrelevant boundaries, and neglect. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2012.671134DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4548967PMC
January 2012
5 Reads

Spatial Heterogeneity in Cancer Control Planning and Cancer Screening Behavior.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2012 ;102(5):1113-1124

Arizona State University.

Each state is autonomous in its comprehensive cancer control (CCC) program, and considerable heterogeneity exists in the program plans. However, researchers often focus on the concept of nationally representative data and pool observations across states using regression analysis to come up with average effects when interpreting results. Due to considerable state autonomy and heterogeneity in various dimensions-including culture, politics, historical precedent, regulatory environment, and CCC efforts-it is important to examine states separately and to use geographic analysis to translate findings in place and time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2012.657494DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4059347PMC
January 2012
15 Reads

Measuring Ethnic Clustering and Exposure with the statistic: An Exploratory Analysis of Irish, Germans, and Yankees in 1880 Newark.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2012 ;102(1):84-102

Spatial Structures in the Social Sciences Dept. of Sociology Brown University ( ).

The study of population patterns has animated a large body of urban social research over the years. An important part of this literature is concerned with the identification and measurement of segregation patterns. Recently, emphatic calls have been made to develop measures that are better able to capture the geography of population patterns. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2011.620502DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4028146PMC
January 2012
1 Read

Connecting the Dots Between Health, Poverty and Place in Accra, Ghana.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2012 ;102(5):932-941

Department of Geography, George Washington University.

West Africa has a rapidly growing population, an increasing fraction of which lives in urban informal settlements characterized by inadequate infrastructure and relatively high health risks. Little is known, however, about the spatial or health characteristics of cities in this region or about the spatial inequalities in health within them. In this article we show how we have been creating a data-rich field laboratory in Accra, Ghana, to connect the dots between health, poverty, and place in a large city in West Africa. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2012.671132DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3922133PMC
January 2012
8 Reads

Integration of Spatial and Social Network Analysis in Disease Transmission Studies.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2012 ;105(5):1004-1015

Department of Geography, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ; Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

This study presents a case study of how social network and spatial analytical methods can be used simultaneously for disease transmission modeling. The paper first reviews strategies employed in previous studies and then offers the example of transmission of two bacterial diarrheal diseases in rural Bangladesh. The goal is to understand how diseases vary socially above and beyond the effects of the local neighborhood context. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2012.671129DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3806718PMC
January 2012

Spatial Epidemiology of HIV among Injection Drug Users in Tijuana, Mexico.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2012 ;102(5):1190-1199

University of California San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California, USA.

The northwest border city of Tijuana is Mexico's fifth largest and is experiencing burgeoning drug use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics. Since local geography influences disease risk, we explored the spatial distribution of HIV among injection drug users (IDUs). From 2006-2007, 1056 IDUs were recruited using respondent-driven sampling, and then followed for eighteen months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2012.674896DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3628541PMC
January 2012
16 Reads

Neighborhoods and Fertility in Accra, Ghana: An AMOEBA-based Approach.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2010 ;100(3):558-578

Department of Geography, San Diego State University.

Fertility levels remain high in most of sub-Saharan Africa, despite recent declines, and even in a large capital city such as Accra, Ghana, women are having children at a pace that is well above replacement level and this will contribute to significant levels of future population growth in the city. Our purpose in this paper is to evaluate the way in which neighborhood context may shape reproductive behavior in Accra. In the process, we introduce several important innovations to the understanding of intra-urban fertility levels in a sub-Saharan African city: (1) despite the near explosion of work on neighborhoods as a spatial unit of analysis, very little of this research has been conducted outside of the richer countries; (2) we characterize neighborhoods on the basis of local knowledge of what we call "vernacular neighborhoods"; (3) we then define what we call "organic neighborhoods" using a new clustering tool-the AMOEBA algorithm-to create these neighborhoods; and then (4) we evaluate and explain which of the neighborhood concepts has the largest measurable contextual effect on an individual woman's reproductive behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045601003791391DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3093308PMC
January 2010
2 Reads

The Spatial Dynamics of Poliomyelitis in the United States: From Epidemic Emergence to Vaccine-Induced Retreat, 1910-1971.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 2005 Jun;95(2):269-293

This article seeks to advance an understanding of the spatial dynamics of one of the great emergent viral diseases of the twentieth century-poliomyelitis. From an apparently rare clinical condition occurring only sporadically or in small outbreaks before the late nineteenth century, poliomyelitis had, by the early 1950s, developed into a globally distributed epidemic disease. But, from 1955, continued growth was suddenly and dramatically reversed by the mass administration of inactivated (killed) and live (attenuated) poliovirus vaccines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8306.2005.00460.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1473032PMC
June 2005
1 Read

Geography and the global environment.

Authors:
D M Liverman

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 1999 ;89(1):107-20

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/0004-5608.00133DOI Listing
July 2009
2 Reads

Disease and ethnicity in an urban environment.

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 1981 ;71(1):40-9

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8306.1981.tb01339.xDOI Listing

Native population decline in Totonicapán, Guatemala.

Authors:
T T Veblen

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 1977 ;67(4):484-99

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8306.1977.tb01157.xDOI Listing
October 1979

Insalubrious California.

Authors:
K Thompson

Ann Assoc Am Geogr 1969 ;59:50-64

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8306.1969.tb00657.xDOI Listing
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