466 results match your criteria Annals Of Dyslexia[Journal]


Sight word acquisition in first grade students at risk for reading disabilities: an item-level exploration of the number of exposures required for mastery.

Ann Dyslexia 2020 Jun 17. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Florida Center for Reading Research, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.

The purpose of this study was to examine word learning efficiency in at-risk first grade students (N = 93) participating in a yearlong study evaluating a multicomponent intervention targeting word reading and decoding skills. As part of each intervention lesson, students participated in a 1 to 3-min sight word reading activity in which high-frequency words were read from a list until mastered, at which point the word dropped off the list. This study explored factors predicting the number of exposures required for item reading mastery (N = 145 words). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-020-00198-7DOI Listing

Better read it to me: Benefits of audio versions of variable message signs in drivers with dyslexia.

Ann Dyslexia 2020 May 30. Epub 2020 May 30.

Departamento de Psicología Evolutiva y de la Educación/ERI Lectura, Facultad de Psicología, Universidad de Valencia, Avenida Blasco Ibáñez, 21 46010, Valencia, Spain.

Adults with dyslexia may find difficulties in reading the messages on variable message signs (VMS) while driving. These signs are an essential part of the traffic communication systems, aimed at informing road users of special circumstances, such as congestion, traffic diversion, or unexpected events. A driving simulation experiment was conducted to test if complementary audio versions of the VMS would be helpful for drivers with dyslexia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-020-00199-6DOI Listing

Predicting Arabic word reading: A cross-classified generalized random-effects analysis showing the critical role of morphology.

Ann Dyslexia 2020 May 1. Epub 2020 May 1.

Faculty of Education, Queen's University, Ontario, Canada.

The distinctive features of the Arabic language and orthography offer opportunities to investigate multiple word characteristics at the item level. The aim of this paper was to model differences in word reading at the item level among 3rd grade native Arabic-speaking children (n = 303) using cross-classified generalized random-effects (CCGRE) analysis. The participants read 80 vowelized words that varied in multiple elements that may contribute to their decodability: number of letters, number of syllables, number of morphemes, ligaturing (connectivity), semantics (concrete vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-020-00193-yDOI Listing

Latent profile analysis of students' reading development and the relation of cognitive variables to reading profiles.

Ann Dyslexia 2020 Apr 14;70(1):94-114. Epub 2020 Apr 14.

Faculty of Education, Free University of Bozen, Regensburger Allee 16, 39042, Brixen - Bressanone, Italy.

Previous studies have showed that early problems with word decoding can lead to poor performance in text reading and comprehension and suggest that poor readers often struggle with reading deficits throughout their school years. Therefore, early detection of those children who are at risk for slow reading development and/or who belong to the lowest reading profiles is essential in order to organize proper support. The present study explores the heterogeneity and prevalence of latent reading profiles among 769 Finnish- and German-reading students during their first and second school years in three countries (Finland, Germany, and Italy) using latent profile analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-020-00196-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7188696PMC

Do kindergarten teachers possess adequate knowledge of basic language constructs to teach children to read English as a foreign language?

Ann Dyslexia 2020 Apr 6;70(1):79-93. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Department of Linguistics and Modern Languages, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong.

The contribution of teacher knowledge to learning outcomes at the beginning stages of literacy acquisition is of growing concern because the ability to provide quality instruction is central to successful literacy acquisition, particularly for pupils with dyslexia. To date, the majority of research has focused on teachers of English as a first language. Yet, English is the most widely taught foreign language today. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-020-00197-8DOI Listing

Adults with dyslexia: how can they achieve academic success despite impairments in basic reading and writing abilities? The role of text structure sensitivity as a compensatory skill.

Ann Dyslexia 2020 Apr 27;70(1):115-140. Epub 2020 Mar 27.

University of Salamanca (USAL), Avenue de la Merced, 109, 37005, Salamanca, Spain.

The aim of this study was to investigate (1) whether a sample of highly educated individuals with dyslexia living under optimal personal, educational, cultural, and socioeconomic conditions continues to display core deficits in reading and writing skills during adulthood (extending prior results in Dutch, English, Hebrew, and Spanish to the Portuguese writing system); (2) whether these individuals can compensate for the effects of persistent core deficits when reading complex academic texts; (3) which cognitive resources, such as reading strategies, are used as compensatory mechanisms; and (4) whether quality of life is affected in these individuals. These questions were examined in a sample of 28 adults with dyslexia (DG) and 28 control participants (CG) paired by sex, age, education, and occupation, with a mean of 15 years of formal education. Participants completed measures of phonological awareness; decoding of syllables, words, and pseudowords; writing; reading comprehension (inferential and literal questions, recall, and sensitivity to the rhetorical structure of the target text); and quality of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-020-00195-wDOI Listing

Inter-letter spacing, inter-word spacing, and font with dyslexia-friendly features: testing text readability in people with and without dyslexia.

Ann Dyslexia 2020 Apr 14;70(1):141-152. Epub 2020 Mar 14.

Department of Life Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy.

Over the last years, several studies have suggested a possible link between dyslexia and deficits in low-level visual processing (e.g., excessive crowding). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-020-00194-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7188700PMC

Using conceptual change theory to help preservice teachers understand dyslexia.

Ann Dyslexia 2020 Apr 26;70(1):62-78. Epub 2020 Feb 26.

Department of Educational Psychology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 73019-2041, USA.

Recently, many states passed laws requiring pre- and in-service teachers to receive professional development in dyslexia awareness. Even though misconceptions regarding dyslexia are widespread, there is a paucity of research on how to effectively remove misconceptions and replace them with accurate knowledge. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a researcher-created refutation text grounded in conceptual change theory could produce significant conceptual change in preservice teacher knowledge of dyslexia when compared with a control text about dyslexia (Dyslexia Basics, International Dyslexia Association; IDA, 2018). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-020-00192-zDOI Listing

Character and child factors contribute to character recognition development among good and poor Chinese readers from grade 1 to 6.

Ann Dyslexia 2020 Feb 25. Epub 2020 Feb 25.

Learning Research and Development Center and Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

In light of the dramatic growth of Chinese learners worldwide and a need for a cross-linguistic research on Chinese literacy development, this study investigated (a) the effects of character properties (i.e., orthographic consistency and transparency) on character acquisition, and (b) the effects of individual learner differences (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-020-00191-0DOI Listing
February 2020

Investigating the double-deficit hypothesis of developmental dyslexia in an orthography of intermediate depth.

Ann Dyslexia 2020 Apr 24;70(1):43-61. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Neuropsychological Assessment and Ageing Processes (NAAP) group from the Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

The present study aimed to investigate the double-deficit hypothesis (DDH) in an orthography of intermediate depth. Eighty-five European Portuguese-speaking children with developmental dyslexia, aged 7 to 12, were tested on measures of phonological awareness (PA), naming speed (NS), reading, and spelling. The results indicated that PA and NS were not significantly correlated, and that NS predicts reading fluency (but not reading accuracy and spelling) beyond what is accounted for by PA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-020-00190-1DOI Listing

Variations in the use of simple and context-sensitive grapheme-phoneme correspondences in English and German developing readers.

Ann Dyslexia 2020 Jan 18. Epub 2020 Jan 18.

Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.

Learning to read in most alphabetic orthographies requires not only the acquisition of simple grapheme-phoneme correspondences (GPCs) but also the acquisition of context-sensitive GPCs, where surrounding letters change a grapheme's pronunciation. We aimed to explore the use and development of simple GPCs (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00189-3DOI Listing
January 2020

English phonological specificity predicts early French reading difficulty in emerging bilingual children.

Ann Dyslexia 2020 Apr 26;70(1):27-42. Epub 2019 Nov 26.

Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

The purpose of the present study was to examine the predictive value of a dynamic test of English and French lexical specificity on at-risk reading classification in 13 at-risk and 44 not at-risk emerging English (L1)-French (L2) bilingual Grade 1 children (M = 75.87 months, SD = 3.18) enrolled in an early French immersion program in Canada. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00188-4DOI Listing

A meta-analysis of reading-level match dyslexia studies in consistent alphabetic orthographies.

Ann Dyslexia 2020 Apr 30;70(1):1-26. Epub 2019 Oct 30.

Department of Educational Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.

We provide a meta-analytic review of all group-comparison studies that used reading-level match design, were conducted in highly consistent European orthographies, included children with dyslexia younger than 13 years of age as participants, and included measures of one or more of the potential causes of dyslexia. We identified 21 studies meeting these criteria that examined one or more of phonological awareness, rapid naming, verbal short-term memory, or auditory temporal processing. A random effects model analysis showed first that the groups were matched imperfectly and they differed significantly in word reading measures not used for matching. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00187-5DOI Listing

Post-treatment reading development in children with dyslexia: the challenge remains.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 10 15;69(3):279-296. Epub 2019 Oct 15.

Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Montessorilaan 3, PO Box 9104, Nijmegen, HE, 6500, The Netherlands.

The goal of this study was to examine the post-treatment development of word and pseudoword accuracy and fluency and its cognitive and linguistic predictors in Dutch children with dyslexia compared with typical readers in the upper primary grades. Word and pseudoword reading accuracy and fluency were assessed at the start and end of grade 5 and at the end of grade 6. Phonological awareness, rapid naming, verbal short-term memory, vocabulary, and visual attention span were assessed at the start of grade 5. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00186-6DOI Listing
October 2019

Morphological processing influences on dyslexia in Greek-speaking children.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 10 16;69(3):261-278. Epub 2019 Sep 16.

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR, 54124, Thessaloniki, Greece.

The study explored the inflectional morphological awareness of Greek-speaking children with dyslexia in grade 3. The sample consisted of 24 dyslexic children and 32 chronological age-matched typically developing readers. All participants completed two oral experimental tasks of inflectional morphological awareness (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00184-8DOI Listing
October 2019

Validation of curriculum-based reading passages and comparison of college students with and without dyslexia or ADHD.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 10 24;69(3):297-317. Epub 2019 Aug 24.

University of Georgia Regents' Center for Learning Disorders, 337 Milledge Hall, Athens, GA, 30602, USA.

Although reading is an essential skill for college success, little is known about how college students with and without disabilities read within their actual college curriculum. In the present article, we report on two studies addressing this issue. Within study 1, we developed and validated curriculum-based oral reading fluency measures using a sample of college students without disabilities (N = 125). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00183-9DOI Listing
October 2019

Music-related abilities among readers with dyslexia.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 10 24;69(3):318-334. Epub 2019 Aug 24.

Department of Communication Disorders, Ariel University, Ariel, Israel.

Research suggests that a central difficulty in dyslexia may be impaired rapid temporal processing. Good temporal processing is also needed for musical perception, which relies on the ability to detect rapid changes. Our study is the first to measure the perception of adults with and without dyslexia on all three dimensions of music (rhythm, pitch, and spectrum), as well as their capacity for auditory imagery and detection of slow changes, while controlling for working memory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00185-7DOI Listing
October 2019

Exploring the use of network meta-analysis in education: examining the correlation between ORF and text complexity measures.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 10 27;69(3):335-354. Epub 2019 Jul 27.

Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.

Calls for empirical investigations of the Common Core standards (CCSSs) for English Language Arts have been widespread, particularly in the area of text complexity in the primary grades (e.g., Hiebert & Mesmer Educational Research, 42(1), 44-51, 2013). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00180-yDOI Listing
October 2019

E-book reading hinders aspects of long-text comprehension for adults with dyslexia.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 07 16;69(2):243-259. Epub 2019 Jul 16.

Brain and Language Research Institute/Institute of Language, Communication and the Brain, Aix-Marseille Université and CNRS, Aix-en-Provence, France.

Developmental dyslexia is a long-lasting reading deficit that persists into adulthood. In spite of many difficulties, some adults with dyslexia reach levels of reading comprehension similar to those of unimpaired readers and successfully study at university. While digital technologies offer many potential tools to facilitate reading, there are differences between printed books and e-books, particularly regarding the interaction between the reader and the text (paratextual cues). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00182-wDOI Listing
July 2019
1 Read

NL reading skills mediate the relationship between NL phonological processing skills and a foreign language (FL) reading skills in students with and without dyslexia: a case of a NL (Polish) and FL (English) with different degrees of orthographic consistency.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 07 8;69(2):219-242. Epub 2019 Jul 8.

Institute of Psychology, Social Sciences Faculty, University of Gdansk, Bażyńskiego 4, 80-952, Gdańsk, Poland.

The aim of our study was to examine the relationship between NL (Native Language: Polish) phonological processing skills (verbal and phonological short-term memory, phoneme segmentation and blending, rapid automatised naming (RAN)) and the accuracy and fluency of NL and English as a Foreign Language (EFL) word and nonword decoding and word recognition skills of Polish students with and without dyslexia. Sixty-three (45%) high school and junior high school students with and 78 (55%) without dyslexia participated. We found that dyslexia, years of studying EFL at school and privately, NL phoneme blending and RAN predicted word reading accuracy in EFL, and dyslexia, years of studying EFL privately, and NL RAN predicted EFL word reading fluency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00181-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6669197PMC

Children with dyslexia in different cultures: Investigation of anxiety and coping strategies of children with dyslexia in Indonesia and Germany.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 07 5;69(2):204-218. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

Padjadjaran University, Bandung, Indonesia.

Hitherto the majority of research on anxiety and coping was undertaken on individuals with specific profiles (i.e., individuals with specific difficulties or in cross-cultural settings). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00179-5DOI Listing

Development of orthographic representations in Spanish children with dyslexia: the influence of previous semantic and phonological knowledge.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 07 15;69(2):186-203. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Psychology, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.

In transparent orthographic systems, the main characteristic of developmental dyslexia is poor reading fluency. Several studies have reported that children with dyslexia have difficulties forming orthographic representations of words, which hampers good reading fluency. This study aimed at evaluating whether the semantic-phonological training prior to word reading could facilitate the formation of orthographic representations and leading an improvement in reading fluency. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11881-019-00178-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00178-6DOI Listing
July 2019
24 Reads

Annals of Dyslexia New Investigator Award.

Authors:

Ann Dyslexia 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00177-7DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Explicit linguistic knowledge is necessary, but not sufficient, for the provision of explicit early literacy instruction.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 04;69(1):99-113

College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Teacher's knowledge can influence the act of teaching and affect children's learning outcomes. Linguistic and language knowledge of teachers plays an important role in supporting learners at the beginning to read stage. This study examines the language and linguistic knowledge of teachers of beginning readers in New Zealand, how these teachers perceive their own practices in teaching reading, and the relationship with the nature of observed instructional practices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-00168-0DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Characterizing the knowledge of educators receiving training in systematic literacy instruction.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 04;69(1):21-33

Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN, USA.

Addressing the needs of students with dyslexia requires an in-depth knowledge of various components of a multi-dimensional approach to reading intervention, which is supported by an understanding of the structure of the language being taught. The current study explored the association between teacher knowledge of the English language and different stages of training provided through 2-year courses that meet the objectives of the International Dyslexia Association (IDA) standards of teacher knowledge and practice. It included 347 K-12 licensed teachers who were at various stages of training when they completed a test of knowledge in the areas of Phonological Sensitivity, Phonemic Awareness, Decoding, Spelling, and Morphology. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11881-018-00174-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-00174-2DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Distinct effects of visual and auditory temporal processing training on reading and reading-related abilities in Chinese children with dyslexia.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 07 22;69(2):166-185. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Department of Special Education and Counselling, The Education University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

This study aimed to examine the effects of temporal processing training on the reading abilities of Chinese children with dyslexia. In total, 69 Chinese children with dyslexia in grades three through six were recruited in Taiwan. The children were divided into the following three equal groups: (1) auditory temporal processing training group, (2) visual temporal processing training group, and (3) control group with no specific training. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11881-019-00176-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-019-00176-8DOI Listing
July 2019
27 Reads

Elementary teacher's knowledge of response to intervention implementation: a preliminary factor analysis.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 04;69(1):34-53

Southern Methodist University, Suite 400, 6116 N. Central Expy., Dallas, TX, 75206, USA.

In the USA, many states have adopted response to intervention or multi-tiered systems of supports to provide early intervention. However, there is considerable variability in how states and schools implement RTI. Teachers are responsible for using student data from RTI to inform instructional decisions for students with or at risk for dyslexia, so it is necessary to understand the knowledge they have about the structure of RTI in their individual schools. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-00171-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7141440PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

Knowledge about basic language constructs among teachers of English as a Foreign Language in China and South Korea.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 04;69(1):136-152

Department of Teaching, Learning, and Culture, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA.

The purpose of the present study is to explore cross-cultural differences among teachers of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) on the basic language constructs and the impacts on their perceived teaching ability in English-reading instruction. Chinese EFL (n = 73) and Korean EFL (n = 39) teachers were administered the Reading Teacher Knowledge Survey for testing their implicit and explicit knowledge on phonemic awareness, phonological awareness, phonics, and morphological awareness; and their self-perceived teaching ability on teaching typical readers, struggling readers, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and reading comprehension. Results showed that both Chinese EFL and Korean EFL teachers' knowledge on the phonemic awareness, phonological awareness, and phonics was implicit rather than explicit. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11881-018-00169-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-00169-zDOI Listing
April 2019
19 Reads

Expert reading coaching via technology: Investigating the reading, writing, and spelling outcomes of students in grades K-8 experiencing significant reading learning disabilities.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 04;69(1):54-79

Institute for Evidence-Based Education, Department of Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, Southern Methodist University, 6330 Lavendale Avenue, Dallas, TX, 75230, USA.

While qualitative research has shown great benefits for teachers who receive coaching, there is a paucity of experimental research examining students' academic outcomes after their teachers received ongoing support from a knowledgeable and experienced coach. Thus, a quasi-experimental design investigated the literacy outcomes of 452 students experiencing reading learning disabilities in grades K-8th whose special education and/or resource room teachers (n = 44) received student data-focused coaching support through on-site coaching, on-demand coaching (teachers could request support if needed), or through technology-based coaching. Specifically, researchers wanted to investigate if technology-based coaching was as effective as in-classroom support for increasing teachers' knowledge and implementation of research-based reading instructional routines and ultimately, improving the reading, writing, and spelling outcomes of students with reading learning disabilities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-00175-1DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Introduction: teacher perception, self-efficacy and teacher knowledge relating to literacy.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 04;69(1):1-4

College of Education and Human Development, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX, 77845, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-00173-3DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Theory and reported practice in EFL literacy instruction: EFL teachers' perceptions about classroom practices.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 04;69(1):114-135

Department of Learning Disabilities, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.

Acquiring literacy in English as a foreign language (EFL) is important for language development. However, many students enter middle school without adequate EFL literacy skills. This may indicate a gap between EFL literacy instruction theory and the classroom practice that is occurring in elementary school classrooms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-00172-4DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Discovering the impact of reading coursework and discipline-specific mentorship on first-year teachers' self-efficacy: a latent class analysis.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 04;69(1):80-98

Department of Teaching, Learning, and Culture, Texas A&M University, 4232 TAMU, 540 Ross Street, College Station, TX, 77843, USA.

Teacher self-efficacy is critical because it predicts teachers' future behavior and impacts teacher turnover. Most teachers begin their career with moderate to high self-efficacy for teaching, but often experience a sharp decline during the first year of teaching. After the first year, their self-efficacy begins to increase but rarely rises to the level it was prior to beginning teaching. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-00167-1DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Etiology of teacher knowledge and instructional skills for literacy at the upper elementary grades.

Ann Dyslexia 2019 04;69(1):5-20

Mary Emily Warner Professor of Education, Arizona State University, 1050 S. Forest Mall, 434E Farmer Bldg, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA.

The purpose of this research was to study the etiology of teacher knowledge about and factors that influence implementation of evidence-based reading and writing interventions at the upper elementary grade levels. Five data sources are used in this study: first, we used teacher surveys about their pre-service preparation on reading comprehension and literacy practices gathered during a recent cluster randomized control trial on a reading comprehension intervention conducted with 280 fourth and fifth-grade teachers and their classroom students. We also conducted focus group interviews with 43% of the teachers and observed 90% of the teachers once during the implementation years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-00170-6DOI Listing
April 2019
6 Reads

Are predictors of reading impairment in isolated cleft similar to those in idiopathic dyslexia?

Authors:
Amy Lynn Conrad

Ann Dyslexia 2019 07 7;69(2):153-165. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, 146-B, CDD. 100 Hawkins Dr., Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA.

Children with isolated cleft of the lip and/or palate (iCL/P) are at increased risk for reading impairment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of early risk factors (hearing, speech, and early literacy) on reading performance compared to unaffected participants with average (uAR) and impaired (uIR) reading. Reading achievement and early literacy skills were evaluated across three groups (27 iCL/P, 32 uAR, and 33 uIR). Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11881-018-00166-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-00166-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6504631PMC
July 2019
3 Reads

Cognitive-linguistic profiles of Chinese typical-functioning adolescent dyslexics and high-functioning dyslexics.

Ann Dyslexia 2018 10 17;68(3):229-250. Epub 2018 Aug 17.

Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

Dyslexia is a developmental disability affecting the acquisition of reading and writing skills, and its developmental nature makes longitudinal research of great importance. This study therefore investigated the cognitive-linguistic profiles of the typical-functioning dyslexics and high-functioning dyslexics with longitudinal cohorts of Chinese-speaking adolescents diagnosed with childhood dyslexia. These two dyslexic groups of fifty students (with 25 typical-functioning dyslexics) were assessed in Grade 2 (Time 1) and in Grade 8 (Time 2), whereas 25 typically developing controls were assessed at Time 2. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11881-018-0165-y
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-0165-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6209009PMC
October 2018
42 Reads

Adult perceptions of children with dyslexia in the USA.

Ann Dyslexia 2018 10 9;68(3):203-217. Epub 2018 Aug 9.

Psychological Sciences & the Consortium for Research on Atypical Development and Learning, University of California, Merced, 5200 N. Lake Rd, Merced, CA, 92583, USA.

This study examined adult perceptions of dyslexia among US adults. Participants (n = 623) answered survey questions pertaining to characteristics, views, and possible causes of DYS. Exploratory factor analysis revealed five distinct factors: (1) psychosocial causes, (2) external causes, (3) biological causes, (4) consequences, and (5) controllability. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11881-018-0163-0
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-0163-0DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Influence of increased letter spacing and font type on the reading ability of dyslexic children.

Ann Dyslexia 2018 10 9;68(3):218-228. Epub 2018 Aug 9.

Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Tuzla, Univerzitetska 1, 75000, Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Recent research studies have shown that increased letter spacing has a positive effect on the reading ability of dyslexic individuals. This study aims to investigate the effect of spacing on the readability of different fonts for children with and without dyslexia. Results did not support the hypothesis of better performance among children with dyslexia when reading text in Dyslexie than in other fonts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-0164-zDOI Listing
October 2018
18 Reads

Predictors for grade 6 reading in children at familial risk of dyslexia.

Ann Dyslexia 2018 10 11;68(3):181-202. Epub 2018 Jul 11.

Center for Language and Cognition Groningen (CLCG), Faculty of Arts, University of Groningen, Oude Kijk in 't Jatstraat 26, 9712 EK, Groningen, the Netherlands.

The present study investigates whether grade 6 reading outcomes, reading fluency, and reading comprehension can be predicted by grade 3 reading fluency, familial risk of dyslexia (FR), and grade 3 reading related skills: rapid automatized naming (RAN), phonological awareness (PA), and vocabulary. In a sample of 150 children, of whom 83 had a parent with dyslexia, correlation and regression analyses were performed. FR, measured on a continuous scale, was by itself related to all outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-0162-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6209008PMC
October 2018
9 Reads

Spatial selective attention and asynchrony of cognitive systems in adult dyslexic readers: an ERPs and behavioral study.

Authors:
Shay Menashe

Ann Dyslexia 2018 07 21;68(2):145-164. Epub 2018 Jun 21.

The Edmond J. Safra Brain Research Center for the Study of Learning Disabilities, Faculty of Education, University of Haifa, 31905, Mt. Carmel, Haifa, Israel.

The aim of this study was to gain additional knowledge about the asynchrony phenomenon in developmental dyslexia, especially when spatial selective attention is manipulated. Adults with developmental dyslexia and non-impaired readers underwent two experimental tasks, one including alphabetic stimuli (pre-lexical consonant-vowel syllables) and the other containing non-alphabetic stimuli (pictures and sounds of animals). Participants were instructed to attend to the right or left hemifields and to respond to all stimuli on that hemifield. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-0160-3DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

Atypical predictive processing during visual statistical learning in children with developmental dyslexia: an event-related potential study.

Ann Dyslexia 2018 07 15;68(2):165-179. Epub 2018 Jun 15.

Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 5010, Atlanta, GA, 30302, USA.

Previous research suggests that individuals with developmental dyslexia perform below typical readers on non-linguistic cognitive tasks involving the learning and encoding of statistical-sequential patterns. However, the neural mechanisms underlying such a deficit have not been well examined. The aim of the present study was to investigate the event-related potential (ERP) correlates of sequence processing in a sample of children diagnosed with dyslexia using a non-linguistic visual statistical learning paradigm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-0161-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6390967PMC
July 2018
1 Read

Predicting reading disabilities using dynamic assessment of decoding before and after the onset of reading instruction: a longitudinal study from kindergarten through grade 2.

Ann Dyslexia 2018 07 5;68(2):126-144. Epub 2018 Jun 5.

Centre for Reading Research, Department of Nordic Studies and Linguistics, University of Copenhagen, Emil Holms Kanal 2, DK-2300, Copenhagen S, Denmark.

The present study examined the predictive validity of a dynamic test of decoding in which participants are taught three novel letters and how to synthesize the corresponding letter sounds into new words. One version of this dynamic test was administered to 158 kindergarten children before the onset of formal reading instruction along with traditional predictors of reading. Similarly, a parallel version of the dynamic test was administered to the same children after a few months of formal reading instruction. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11881-018-0159-9
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-0159-9DOI Listing
July 2018
36 Reads

The multiple deficit model of dyslexia: what does it mean for identification and intervention?

Ann Dyslexia 2018 07 24;68(2):104-125. Epub 2018 Apr 24.

Luke Waites Center for Dyslexia and Learning Disorders, Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, 2222 Welborn St, Dallas, TX, 75219, USA.

Research demonstrates that phonological skills provide the basis of reading acquisition and are a primary processing deficit in dyslexia. This consensus has led to the development of effective methods of reading intervention. However, a single phonological deficit is not sufficient to account for the heterogeneity of individuals with dyslexia, and recent research provides evidence that supports a multiple-deficit model of reading disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-0157-yDOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

Implicit sequence learning is preserved in dyslexic children.

Ann Dyslexia 2018 04 3;68(1):1-14. Epub 2018 Apr 3.

Cognitive Neuroscience Research Group, Center for Biomedical Research (CBMR), University of Algarve, Faro, Portugal.

This study investigates the implicit sequence learning abilities of dyslexic children using an artificial grammar learning task with an extended exposure period. Twenty children with developmental dyslexia participated in the study and were matched with two control groups-one matched for age and other for reading skills. During 3 days, all participants performed an acquisition task, where they were exposed to colored geometrical forms sequences with an underlying grammatical structure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-0158-xDOI Listing
April 2018
8 Reads

Are RAN deficits in university students with dyslexia due to defective lexical access, impaired anchoring, or slow articulation?

Ann Dyslexia 2018 07 6;68(2):85-103. Epub 2018 Mar 6.

Department of Educational Studies, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 2109, Australia.

The purpose of this study was to examine different hypotheses in relation to RAN deficits in dyslexia. Thirty university students with dyslexia and 32 chronological-age controls were assessed on RAN Digits and Colors as well as on two versions of RAN Letters and Objects (one with five items repeated 16 times and one with 20 items repeated four times). In addition, participants were tested on discrete letter and object naming, phonological awareness, orthographic knowledge, and speed of processing, and the RAN Letters and Objects total times were partitioned into pause times and articulation times. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-0156-zDOI Listing
July 2018
6 Reads

Bias in dyslexia screening in a Dutch multicultural population.

Ann Dyslexia 2018 04 23;68(1):43-68. Epub 2018 Feb 23.

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands.

We set out to address the adequacy of dyslexia screening in Dutch and non-western immigrant children, using the Dutch Dyslexia Screening Test (DST-NL) and outcomes of the Dutch dyslexia protocol, both of which are susceptible to cultural bias. Using the protocol as standard, we conducted an ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristics) analysis in Dutch and immigrant third, fifth, and seventh graders, combining a cross-sectional and longitudinal design. Sensitivity and specificity increased with grade, but were non-significant for various subtests in the lowest grade, suggesting considerable non-convergence between the two measures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-018-0155-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5934456PMC
April 2018
2 Reads

Elegant grapheme-phoneme correspondence: a periodic chart and singularity generalization unify decoding.

Authors:
Louis Gates

Ann Dyslexia 2018 04 11;68(1):69-83. Epub 2017 Dec 11.

Columbia School District #400, Burbank, WA, USA.

The accompanying article introduces highly transparent grapheme-phoneme relationships embodied within a Periodic table of decoding cells, which arguably presents the quintessential transparent decoding elements. The study then folds these cells into one highly transparent but simply stated singularity generalization-this generalization unifies the decoding cells (97% transparency). Deeper, the periodic table and singularity generalization together highlight the connectivity of the periodic cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-017-0150-xDOI Listing
April 2018
1 Read

Dyslexie font does not benefit reading in children with or without dyslexia.

Ann Dyslexia 2018 04 4;68(1):25-42. Epub 2017 Dec 4.

Behavioural Science Institute & Department of Special Education, Radboud University, Montessorilaan 3, 6525, HR, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

In two experiments, the claim was tested that the font "Dyslexie", specifically designed for people with dyslexia, eases reading performance of children with (and without) dyslexia. Three questions were investigated. (1) Does the Dyslexie font lead to faster and/or more accurate reading? (2) Do children have a preference for the Dyslexie font? And, (3) is font preference related to reading performance? In Experiment 1, children with dyslexia (n = 170) did not read text written in Dyslexie font faster or more accurately than in Arial font. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11881-017-0154-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-017-0154-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5934461PMC
April 2018
4 Reads

Examining reading comprehension text and question answering time differences in university students with and without a history of reading difficulties.

Ann Dyslexia 2018 04 17;68(1):15-24. Epub 2017 Nov 17.

Department of Educational Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

The current study aimed to examine performance times during text reading and question answering of students with and without a history of reading difficulties. Forty-three university students with a history of reading difficulties (HRD) were compared to 124 university students without a history of reading difficulties on measures of word and nonword reading rate, text reading rate and comprehension, and question answering times. Results showed that students with HRD demonstrated slower word, nonword, and text reading rates than their peers, but had comparable reading comprehension scores. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-017-0153-7DOI Listing
April 2018
6 Reads

Length effects in pseudo-word spelling: stronger in dyslexic than in non-dyslexic students.

Ann Dyslexia 2017 Oct 13;67(3):369-382. Epub 2017 Nov 13.

Department of Education, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.

It is often discussed whether dyslexics show a deviant pattern of reading and spelling development when compared to typically developing students, or whether they follow the same pattern as other students, only at markedly slower rate. The present cross-sectional study investigated phonological encoding skills in dyslexic Danish students. We compared dyslexic and non-dyslexic students from grades 3, 5, 7, and 9 and examined whether effects of item length were stronger in the dyslexic groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-017-0149-3DOI Listing
October 2017
2 Reads

The role of feedback in implicit and explicit artificial grammar learning: a comparison between dyslexic and non-dyslexic adults.

Ann Dyslexia 2017 Oct 13;67(3):333-355. Epub 2017 Nov 13.

Learning Disabilities Studies, School of Education, Bar Ilan University, 5290002, Ramat-Gan, Israel.

The importance of feedback for learning has been firmly established over the past few decades. The question of whether feedback plays a significant role in the statistical learning abilities of adults with dyslexia, however, is currently unresolved. Here, we examined the role of feedback in grammaticality judgment, type of structural knowledge, and confidence rating in both typically developed and dyslexic adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11881-017-0147-5DOI Listing
October 2017
2 Reads