9 results match your criteria Animal Reproduction[Journal]

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Regulation of germ line stem cell homeostasis.

Anim Reprod 2015 Jan-Mar;12(1):35-45

Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.

Mammalian spermatogenesis is a complex process in which spermatogonial stem cells of the testis (SSCs) develop to ultimately form spermatozoa. In the seminiferous epithelium, SSCs self-renew to maintain the pool of stem cells throughout life, or they differentiate to generate a large number of germ cells. A balance between SSC self-renewal and differentiation is therefore essential to maintain normal spermatogenesis and fertility. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5341791PMC

Small tubules, surprising discoveries: from efferent ductules in the turkey to the discovery that estrogen receptor alpha is essential for fertility in the male.

Authors:
R A Hess

Anim Reprod 2015 Jan-Mar;12(1):7-23

Professor Emeritus, Reproductive Biology & Toxicology, Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, USA.

Efferent ductules are small, delicate tubules that connect rete testis with the head of the epididymis, first identified by de Graaf in 1668. Although difficult to find in routine dissection, the ductules are an essential component of the male reproductive tract and in larger mammals occupy up more than 50% of the caput epididymidis. My introduction to research began with the study of efferent ductules in the domestic turkey, and to my surprise these small structures with kidney-like function become the core for numerous discoveries throughout my scientific career. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5302877PMC
February 2017

Germline modification of domestic animals.

Anim Reprod 2015 Jan-Mar;12(1):93-104

Department of Comparative Biology and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.

Genetically-modified domestic animal models are of increasing significance in biomedical research and agriculture. As authentic ES cells derived from domestic animals are not yet available, the prevailing approaches for engineering genetic modifications in those animals are pronuclear microinjection and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT, also known as cloning). Both pronuclear microinjection and SCNT are inefficient, costly, and time-consuming. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4933526PMC
July 2016
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Comparison of endocrine and cellular mechanisms regulating the corpus luteum of primates and ruminants.

Anim Reprod 2012 Jul;9(3):242-259

Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI, USA ; Department of Animal Sciences, ESALQ, University of Sao Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil.

The corpus luteum (CL) is a transient endocrine organ that is essential for maintenance of pregnancy in both ruminants and primates. The cellular and endocrine mechanisms that regulate the CL in these species have commonalities and some distinct and intriguing differences. Both species have similar cellular content with large luteal cells derived from the granulosa cells of the follicle, small luteal cells from follicular thecal cells, and large numbers of capillary endothelial cells that form the vasculature that has an essential role in optimal CL function. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3674567PMC

Testisimmune privilege - Assumptions facts.

Anim Reprod 2013 Jan;10(1):3-15

Department of Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas, USA.

The testis has long enjoyed a reputation as an immunologically privileged site based on its ability to protect auto-antigenic germ cells and provide an optimal environment for the extended survival of transplanted allo- or xeno-grafts. Exploration of the role of anatomical, physiological, immunological and cellular components in testis immune privilege revealed that the tolerogenic environment of the testis is a result of the immunomodulatory factors expressed or secreted by testicular cells (mainly Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cells, Leydig cells, and resident macrophages). The blood-testis barrier/Sertoli cell barrier, is also important to seclude advanced germ cells but its requirement in testis immune privilege needs further investigation. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4192663PMC
January 2013

Effects of adult onset mild calorie restriction on weight of reproductive organs, plasma parameters and gene expression in male mice.

Anim Reprod 2012 Jan;9(1):40-51

Department of General Biology, Laboratory of Structural Biology, Federal University of Viçosa, Viçosa, MG, Brazil.

Calorie restriction (CR) extends lifespan and delays onset of age-related diseases in various organisms, even when started later in life. Despite benefits for health and lifespan, CR's negative impact on reproduction is documented in some animals. Studies employing approximately 40% CR detected a delay in sexual maturation and impairment of fertility, which were combined with extension of the reproductive period. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3649015PMC
January 2012
2 Reads

MicroRNA control of ovarian function.

Authors:
L K Christenson

Anim Reprod 2010 Jul;7(3):129-133

Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160.

Post-transcriptional gene regulation, a regulatory mechanism classically involved in female and male germ cell function has recently been implicated in control of somatic cells of the ovary and testis. Recent advancements in this field may be attributed primarily to the discovery and study of microRNAs (miRNA), small RNA transcripts that can influence mRNA expression via post-transcriptional gene regulatory mechanisms. In the ovary, targeted deletion of Dicer 1, a key enzyme in miRNA biogenesis, provided the first empirical evidence that miRNA/siRNA were critically involved in multiple aspects of ovarian function (folliculogenesis, oocyte maturation, ovulation, and luteal function). Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3111027PMC

Uterine microRNA signature and consequence of their dysregulation in uterine disorders.

Authors:
Nasser Chegini

Anim Reprod 2010 Jul;7(3):117-128

Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32610.

MicroRNA (miRNA) has emerged as key post-transcriptional regulator and through this mechanism control many normal developmental and physiological processes. Conversely, aberrant expression of some miRNAs has been correlated with various disorders, more specifically, development and progression of malignancy. Endometrium is a dynamic tissue which undergoes extensive cyclic changes in preparation for embryo implantation during reproductive years, as well as changes that occur following menopause, and establishment of benign and malignant uterine disorders. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3275910PMC

The periovulatory period in cattle: progesterone, prostaglandins, oxytocin and ADAMTS proteases.

Anim Reprod 2009 Jan;6(1):60-71

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, USA.

Ovulation has long been recognized as one of the most dramatic reproductive processes. Decades of research on how the LH/FSH surge leads to ovulation have made it clear that the surge induces a very complex cascade of changes. Studies of genetically modified mice have pointed to progesterone (P4) and its receptor (PGR) and the prostaglandins (PGs) as critical components of the ovulatory cascade. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2853051PMC
January 2009
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