369 results match your criteria Animal Health Research Reviews[Journal]


Quality assessment of systematic reviews and meta-analyses that examine preventive antibiotic uses and management practices designed to prevent disease in livestock.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):305-318

Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA.

To implement effective stewardship in food animal production, it is essential that producers and veterinarians are aware of preventive interventions to reduce illness in livestock. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses (SR/MA) provide transparent, replicable, and quality-assessed overviews. At present, it is unknown how many SR/MA evaluate preventive antibiotic use or management practices aimed at reducing disease risk in animal agriculture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S146625231900029XDOI Listing
December 2019

The efficacy of litter management strategies to prevent morbidity and mortality in broiler chickens: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):247-262

Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, ON, Canada.

A systematic review and network meta-analysis (NMA) were conducted to address the question, 'What is the efficacy of litter management strategies to reduce morbidity, mortality, condemnation at slaughter, or total antibiotic use in broilers?' Eligible studies were clinical trials published in English evaluating the efficacy of litter management in broilers on morbidity, condemnations at slaughter, mortality, or total antibiotic use. Multiple databases and two conference proceedings were searched for relevant literature. After relevance screening and data extraction, there were 50 trials evaluating litter type, 22 trials evaluating litter additives, 10 trials comparing fresh to re-used litter, and six trials evaluating floor type. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000227DOI Listing
December 2019

The efficacy of antibiotics to control colibacillosis in broiler poultry: a systematic review.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):263-273

Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, ON, Canada.

The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotics to prevent or control colibacillosis in broilers. Studies found eligible were conducted controlled trials in broilers that evaluated an antibiotic intervention, with at least one of the following outcomes: mortality, feed conversion ratio (FCR), condemnations at slaughter, or total antibiotic use. Four electronic databases plus the gray literature were searched. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000264DOI Listing
December 2019

Systematic reviews and meta-analyses in animal health, performance, and on-farm food safety: a scoping review.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):116-127

Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA.

Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are used to summarize and interpret evidence for clinical decision-making in human health. The extent of the application of these methods in veterinary medicine and animal agriculture is unknown. The goal of this scoping study was to ascertain trends in the publication of systematic reviews and meta-analyses examining animal health, animal performance, and on-farm food safety. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000197DOI Listing
December 2019

Comparative efficacy of teat sealants given prepartum for prevention of intramammary infections and clinical mastitis: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):182-198

Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames50011-3619, IA, USA.

A systematic review and network meta-analysis were conducted to assess the relative efficacy of internal or external teat sealants given at dry-off in dairy cattle. Controlled trials were eligible if they assessed the use of internal or external teat sealants, with or without concurrent antimicrobial therapy, compared to no treatment or an alternative treatment, and measured one or more of the following outcomes: incidence of intramammary infection (IMI) at calving, IMI during the first 30 days in milk (DIM), or clinical mastitis during the first 30 DIM. Risk of bias was based on the Cochrane Risk of Bias 2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000276DOI Listing
December 2019

Comparative efficacy of antimicrobials for treatment of clinical mastitis in lactating dairy cattle: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):229-246

Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs, 1 Stone Road West, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 4Y2, Canada.

A systematic review and network meta-analysis were conducted to assess the relative efficacy of antimicrobial therapy for clinical mastitis in lactating dairy cattle. Controlled trials in lactating dairy cattle with natural disease exposure were eligible if they compared an antimicrobial treatment to a non-treated control, placebo, or a different antimicrobial, for the treatment of clinical mastitis, and assessed clinical or bacteriologic cure. Potential for bias was assessed using a modified Cochrane Risk of Bias 2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000318DOI Listing
December 2019

A systematic review and network meta-analysis of bacterial and viral vaccines, administered at or near arrival at the feedlot, for control of bovine respiratory disease in beef cattle.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):143-162

Guelph, Ontario, N1G 1S1, Canada.

Vaccination against putative causal organisms is a frequently used and preferred approach to controlling bovine respiratory disease complex (BRD) because it reduces the need for antibiotic use. Because approximately 90% of feedlots use and 90% of beef cattle receive vaccines in the USA, information about their comparative efficacy would be useful for selecting a vaccine. We conducted a systematic review and network meta-analysis of studies assessing the comparative efficacy of vaccines to control BRD when administered to beef cattle at or near their arrival at the feedlot. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000288DOI Listing
December 2019

Non-antibiotic approaches for disease prevention and control in beef and veal production: a scoping review.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):128-142

Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, OntarioN1G 2W1, Canada.

Livestock producers are encouraged to reduce the use of antibiotics belonging to classes of medical importance to humans. We conducted a scoping review on non-antibiotic interventions in the form of products or management practices that could potentially reduce the need for antibiotics in beef and veal animals living under intensive production conditions. Our objectives were to systematically describe the research on this broad topic, identify specific topics that could feasibly support systematic reviews, and identify knowledge gaps. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000252DOI Listing
December 2019

Comparative efficacy of antimicrobial treatments in dairy cows at dry-off to prevent new intramammary infections during the dry period or clinical mastitis during early lactation: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):199-216

Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames 50011-3619, USA.

A systematic review and network meta-analysis were conducted to assess the relative efficacy of antimicrobial therapy given to dairy cows at dry-off. Eligible studies were controlled trials assessing the use of antimicrobials compared to no treatment or an alternative treatment, and assessed one or more of the following outcomes: incidence of intramammary infection (IMI) at calving, incidence of IMI during the first 30 days in milk (DIM), or incidence of clinical mastitis during the first 30 DIM. Databases and conference proceedings were searched for relevant articles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000239DOI Listing
December 2019

A systematic review of the efficacy of antibiotics for the prevention of swine respiratory disease.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):291-304

Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

Prevention and control of respiratory disease is a major contributor to antibiotic use in swine. A systematic review was conducted to address the question, 'What is the comparative efficacy of antimicrobials for the prevention of swine respiratory disease?' Eligible studies were controlled trials published in English evaluating prophylactic antibiotics in swine, where clinical morbidity, mortality, or total antibiotic use was assessed. Four databases and the gray literature were searched for relevant articles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000185DOI Listing
December 2019

Comparative efficacy of blanket versus selective dry-cow therapy: a systematic review and pairwise meta-analysis.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):217-228

Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames 50011-3619, USA.

A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to determine the efficacy of selective dry-cow antimicrobial therapy compared to blanket therapy (all quarters/all cows). Controlled trials were eligible if any of the following were assessed: incidence of clinical mastitis during the first 30 DIM, frequency of intramammary infection (IMI) at calving, or frequency of IMI during the first 30 DIM. From 3480 identified records, nine trials were data extracted for IMI at calving. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000306DOI Listing
December 2019

A systematic review and network meta-analysis of injectable antibiotic options for the control of bovine respiratory disease in the first 45 days post arrival at the feedlot.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):163-181

Guelph, Ontario, N1G 1S1, Canada.

We conducted a systematic review and network meta-analysis to determine the comparative efficacy of antibiotics used to control bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef cattle on feedlots. The information sources for the review were: MEDLINE®, MEDLINE In-Process and MEDLINE® Daily, AGRICOLA, Epub Ahead of Print, Cambridge Agricultural and Biological Index, Science Citation Index, Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science, the Proceedings of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, World Buiatrics Conference, and the United States Food and Drug Administration Freedom of Information New Animal Drug Applications summaries. The eligible population was weaned beef cattle raised in intensive systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252320000031DOI Listing
December 2019

How to read and interpret the results of a Bayesian network meta-analysis: a short tutorial.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):106-115

Department of Statistics, Iowa State University, Iowa, United States of America.

In this manuscript we use realistic data to conduct a network meta-analysis using a Bayesian approach to analysis. The purpose of this manuscript is to explain, in lay terms, how to interpret the output of such an analysis. Many readers are familiar with the forest plot as an approach to presenting the results of a pairwise meta-analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000343DOI Listing
December 2019

Efficacy of bacterial vaccines to prevent respiratory disease in swine: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):274-290

Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.

A systematic review and network meta-analysis (MA) was conducted to address the question, 'What is the efficacy of bacterial vaccines to prevent respiratory disease in swine?' Four electronic databases and the grey literature were searched to identify clinical trials in healthy swine where at least one intervention arm was a commercially available vaccine for one or more bacterial pathogens associated with respiratory disease in swine, including Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumonia, Actinobacillus suis, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Pasteurella multocida, Stretococcus suis, Haemophils parasuis, and Mycoplasma hyorhinis. To be eligible, trials had to measure at least one of the following outcomes: incidence of clinical morbidity, mortality, lung lesions, or total antibiotic use. There were 179 eligible trials identified in 146 publications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000173DOI Listing
December 2019

Editorial: Systematic reviews reveal a need for more, better data to inform antimicrobial stewardship practices in animal agriculture.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 12;20(2):103-105

Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, ON, Canada.

This editorial summarizes the key observations from a special issue of Animal Health Research Reviews comprising 14 articles related to the efficacy of antimicrobial and non-antimicrobial approaches to reduce disease in beef, dairy cattle, swine, and broiler chickens. The articles used evidence-based methods, including scoping reviews, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and network meta-analyses. Despite finding evidence of efficacy for some of the interventions examined, across the body of research, there was a lack of replication and inconsistency in outcomes among the included trials, and concerns related to completeness of reporting and trial design and execution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000240DOI Listing
December 2019

Generalizability and comparability of prevalence estimates in the wild bird literature: methodological and epidemiological considerations.

Anim Health Res Rev 2020 Feb 18:1-7. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

Wild birds have been the focus of a great deal of research investigating the epidemiology of zoonotic bacteria and antimicrobial resistance in the environment. While enteric pathogens (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252320000043DOI Listing
February 2020

A review of congenital tremor type A-II in piglets.

Anim Health Res Rev 2020 Feb 18:1-5. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Section of Virology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7028, 75007Uppsala, Sweden.

Congenital tremor (CT) is a neurological disease that affects new-born piglets. It was described in 1922 and six different forms, designated type AI-V and type B, are described based on the causative agents, as well as specific histological findings in the central nervous system (CNS). The various forms present with identical clinical signs consisting of mild to severe tremor of the head and body, sometimes complicated with ataxia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S146625232000002XDOI Listing
February 2020

Causes, types, etiological agents, prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, prevention, effects on human health and future aspects of bovine mastitis.

Anim Health Res Rev 2020 Feb 13:1-14. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore54000, Pakistan.

Mastitis is among the most common and challenging diseases of dairy animals. It is an inflammation of udder tissues due to physical damage, chemical irritation, or infection caused by certain pathogens. Bovine mastitis has been known for ages, but its complex etiology and multi-factorial nature make it difficult to control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000094DOI Listing
February 2020

Zoonotic pathogens in urban animals: Enough research to protect the health of the urban population?

Anim Health Res Rev 2020 Feb 13:1-11. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7054, 75007Uppsala, Sweden.

With more than half of the global population living in cities, the urban areas are also teeming with animals, including peridomestic wildlife, pets, and livestock. Urban animals may carry zoonotic pathogens, and crowded conditions in cities can increase the risk for the human population. We used a systematic approach to screen two publication databases as well as gray literature, and quantified the studies conducted on zoonoses in urban animals with respect to the geographic distribution, the host animal and pathogens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000100DOI Listing
February 2020

The microbiome of the digestive system of ruminants - a review.

Anim Health Res Rev 2020 Jan 10:1-12. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

Institute of Animal Breeding, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Chelmonskiego 38C, 51-630Wroclaw, Poland.

This review aims to explain the influence and characterization of the microbiome in the ruminant digestive system by presenting the knowledge collected so far. The knowledge presented in this work is focused on the main factors affecting the microbiome and the main dependencies that have been found in it so far. The microbiome in the rumen is the first to come into contact with the biomass of the forage and its main purpose is to decompose into smaller particles or compounds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000069DOI Listing
January 2020

Translating 'big data': better understanding of host-pathogen interactions to control bacterial foodborne pathogens in poultry.

Anim Health Res Rev 2020 Jan 7:1-21. Epub 2020 Jan 7.

Food Animal Health Research Program, Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, The Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, USA.

Recent technological advances has led to the generation, storage, and sharing of colossal sets of information ('big data'), and the expansion of 'omics' in science. To date, genomics/metagenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics are arguably the most ground breaking approaches in food and public safety. Here we review some of the recent studies of foodborne pathogens (Campylobacter spp. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000124DOI Listing
January 2020

Non-antimicrobial approaches at drying-off for treating and preventing intramammary infections in dairy cows. Part 1. Meta-analyses of efficacy of using an internal teat sealant without a concomitant antimicrobial treatment.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 06 26;20(1):86-97. Epub 2019 Nov 26.

Département de Sciences Cliniques, Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, St-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 2M2, Canada.

Use of antimicrobial approaches at drying-off for preventing new intramammary infections (IMI) during the dry period in dairy cows could be replaced by non-antimicrobial approaches. Such approaches would be of interest not only for organic but also for conventional dairy producers. The objective of the current review was to quantify the effect of non-antimicrobial internal teat sealant (ITS)-based approaches at drying-off for treating and preventing IMI, when compared with no treatment or with an antimicrobial-based approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000070DOI Listing

A scoping review of 'big data', 'informatics', and 'bioinformatics' in the animal health and veterinary medical literature.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 06;20(1):1-18

Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

Research in big data, informatics, and bioinformatics has grown dramatically (Andreu-Perez J, et al., 2015, IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics 19, 1193-1208). Advances in gene sequencing technologies, surveillance systems, and electronic medical records have increased the amount of health data available. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000136DOI Listing

A review of knowledge discovery process in control and mitigation of avian influenza.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 06 16;20(1):61-71. Epub 2019 Sep 16.

Department of Pathobiology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

In the last several decades, avian influenza virus has caused numerous outbreaks around the world. These outbreaks pose a significant threat to the poultry industry and also to public health. When an avian influenza (AI) outbreak occurs, it is critical to make informed decisions about the potential risks, impact, and control measures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000033DOI Listing

Canine vector-borne disease: mapping and the accuracy of forecasting using big data from the veterinary community.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 06 26;20(1):47-60. Epub 2019 Sep 26.

School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA.

Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of vector-borne disease (VBD) in pets is one cornerstone of companion animal practices. Veterinarians are facing new challenges associated with the emergence, reemergence, and rising incidence of VBD, including heartworm disease, Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, and ehrlichiosis. Increases in the observed prevalence of these diseases have been attributed to a multitude of factors, including diagnostic tests with improved sensitivity, expanded annual testing practices, climatologic and ecological changes enhancing vector survival and expansion, emergence or recognition of novel pathogens, and increased movement of pets as travel companions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000045DOI Listing

Prospects for predictive modeling of transition cow diseases.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 06 16;20(1):19-30. Epub 2019 Sep 16.

Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, 736 Wilson Rd, Room A-201, East Lansing, MI48824, USA.

Transition cow diseases can negatively impact animal welfare and reduce dairy herd profitability. Transition cow disease incidence has remained relatively stable over time despite monitoring and management efforts aimed to reduce the risk of developing diseases. Dairy cattle disease risk is monitored by assessing multiple factors, including certain biomarker test results, health records, feed intake, body condition score, and milk production. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000112DOI Listing

A review of traditional and machine learning methods applied to animal breeding.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 06;20(1):31-46

Department of Animal Biosciences, Centre for Genetic Improvement of Livestock, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada.

The current livestock management landscape is transitioning to a high-throughput digital era where large amounts of information captured by systems of electro-optical, acoustical, mechanical, and biosensors is stored and analyzed on a daily and hourly basis, and actionable decisions are made based on quantitative and qualitative analytic results. While traditional animal breeding prediction methods have been used with great success until recently, the deluge of information starts to create a computational and storage bottleneck that could lead to negative long-term impacts on herd management strategies if not handled properly. A plethora of machine learning approaches, successfully used in various industrial and scientific applications, made their way in the mainstream approaches for livestock breeding techniques, and current results show that such methods have the potential to match or surpass the traditional approaches, while most of the time they are more scalable from a computational and storage perspective. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000148DOI Listing

Accuracy of paratuberculosis diagnostic tests in small ruminants: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 06 19;20(1):98-102. Epub 2019 Nov 19.

Department of Medicine, McGill University, Technology Assessment Unit, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Paratuberculosis is a worldwide infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Various ruminant species can be affected by the disease, and the diagnosis of the disease is challenging in the absence of a gold standard test. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000082DOI Listing

Mechanisms linking bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection with infertility in cattle.

Anim Health Res Rev 2019 06 9;20(1):72-85. Epub 2019 Sep 9.

Department of Pathobiology and Population Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, Hatfield, HertfordshireAL9 7TA, UK.

Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important infectious disease agent that causes significant reproductive and economic losses in the cattle industry worldwide. Although BVDV infection is known to cause poor fertility in cattle, a greater part of the underlying mechanisms particularly associated with early reproductive losses are not clearly understood. Previous studies reported viral compromise of reproductive function in infected bulls. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252319000057DOI Listing

Mannheimia haemolytica in bovine respiratory disease: immunogens, potential immunogens, and vaccines.

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 12;19(2):79-99

Department of Veterinary Pathobiology,Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University,McFarland & Farm Road, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-2007,USA.

Mannheimia haemolytica is the major cause of severe pneumonia in bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Early M. haemolytica bacterins were either ineffective or even enhanced disease in vaccinated cattle, which led to studies of the bacterium's virulence factors and potential immunogens to determine ways to improve vaccines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252318000142DOI Listing
December 2018
38 Reads

A genetic profile of bovine pestiviruses circulating in Brazil (1998-2018).

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 12;19(2):134-141

Setor de Virologia,Universidade Federal de Santa Maria,Av. Roraima, 1000, 63A, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul,97105-900,Brazil.

The pestiviruses bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1), 2 (BVDV-2), and HoBi-like (HoBiPeV) are endemic among Brazilian cattle, the world's largest commercial bovine herd. In the last two decades (1998-2018) over 300 bovine pestiviruses have been partially or fully sequenced in Brazil, including viruses from different regions, different epidemiological backgrounds, and associated with diverse clinical presentations. Phylogenetic analysis of these viruses demonstrated a predominance of BVDV-1 (54. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252318000130DOI Listing
December 2018
31 Reads

Bovine-like coronaviruses in domestic and wild ruminants.

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 12;19(2):113-124

Department of Virology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine,Cairo University,11221 Giza,Egypt.

Coronaviruses (CoVs) produce a wide spectrum of disease syndromes in different mammalian and avian host species. These viruses are well-recognized for their ability to change tissue tropism, to hurdle the interspecies barriers and to adapt ecological variations. It is predicted that the inherent genetic diversity of CoVs caused by accumulation of point mutations and high frequency of homologous recombination is the principal determinant of these competences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252318000117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7108644PMC
December 2018
25 Reads

Effects of selenium source and level in diet on glutathione peroxidase activity, tissue selenium distribution, and growth performance in poultry.

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 12;19(2):166-176

Department for Food Hygiene and Technology,Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade,Belgrade 11000,Serbia.

Today, a few differing sources of selenium (Se), i.e. inorganic, organic, and nano forms of Se, are used as feed supplements for poultry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252318000105DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Parasitic fauna of Polish konik horses (Equus caballus gmelini Antonius) and their impact on breeding: a review.

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 12;19(2):162-165

Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences,Norwida 25/27, 50-375 Wroclaw,Poland.

The influence of internal and external parasites on the health of Polish konik horses housed in different types of management strategies in Poland is discussed. This study includes consolidated data of different authors from the past 50 years, supplemented by results of more recent research. A total of 38 species of helminths (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252318000099DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

What do we know about parasites of wildlife in high biodiversity areas with anthropogenic disturbance? The special case of Mexico.

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 12;19(2):155-161

Departamento de Sanidad Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria,Regional Campus of International Excellence "Campus Mare Nostrum", Universidad de Murcia,30100 Murcia,Spain.

The continual rise of anthropogenic disturbance of ecosystems has been associated with an increasing incidence of emerging diseases. The largest amount of data on emerging diseases relates to bacterial and viral pathogens, but there is a lack of parasite data, especially from wildlife. Monitoring wildlife parasitic diseases should be considered a priority, especially in high biodiversity regions with strong anthropogenic impacts, like Mexico, where the wildlife/livestock/human interface is associated with increased risk of disease transmission. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252318000087DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Effects of transportation on cattle health and production: a review.

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 12 21;19(2):142-154. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Department of Anatomy and Physiology,College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University,Manhattan, Kansas,USA.

The goal of this review is to present a concise and critical assessment of the literature related to physiologic responses in cattle that are subjected to transportation. Over two-thirds of US cattle are transported. Understanding trends in circulating physiologic parameters is an important part of mitigating the negative effects of transportation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252318000075DOI Listing
December 2018
14 Reads

Comparative study in the control of bovine viral diarrhea.

Authors:
Mauro Larghi

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 12 23;19(2):125-133. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine,Institute of Animal Health and Food Safety, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria,Las Palmas de Gran Canaria,SpainandDeveron Veterinary Surgeons,Turriff, Aberdeenshire,UK.

Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important infectious agent affecting herd productivity and reproduction, and leading to massive economic losses. As such, BVD is the subject of a number of control and eradication schemes globally. The key elements of such schemes are: diagnosis and removal of persistently infected animals from herds; implementation of biosecurity practices aimed at preventing the introduction or re-introduction of BVDV in free herds; and ongoing surveillance to monitor the progress of the program and to detect new infections. Read More

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https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S146625231
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252318000129DOI Listing
December 2018
12 Reads

A review of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) testing in livestock with an emphasis on the use of alternative diagnostic specimens.

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 12 22;19(2):100-112. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine,College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University,Ames, Iowa 50011,USA.

Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) remains an important pathogen of livestock more than 120 years after it was identified, with annual costs from production losses and vaccination estimated at €5.3-€17 billion (US$6.5-US$21 billion) in FMDV-endemic areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252318000063DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Antimicrobial-based dry cow therapy approaches for cure and prevention of intramammary infections: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 06;19(1):74-78

Département de pathologie et microbiologie, Faculté de médecine vétérinaire,Université de Montréal,3200 Sicotte, St-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 2M2,Canada.

In dairy herds, application of antimicrobials at drying-off is a common mastitis control measure. This article describes a protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis to address three crucial points regarding antimicrobial usage at drying-off: (1) comparative efficacy of antimicrobials used for preventing new and eliminating existing intramammary infections (IMI); (2) comparison of selective and blanket dry cow therapy approaches in preventing new and eliminating existing IMI; and (3) assessment of the extra prevention against new IMI that can be gained from using antimicrobial-teat sealant combinations versus antimicrobials alone. Five PICO (Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome) questions were formulated to cover the three objectives of the review. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252318000051DOI Listing
June 2018
5 Reads

Role of neutrophils in equine asthma.

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 06 24;19(1):65-73. Epub 2018 May 24.

Department of Pharmacology,Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Universidad Austral de Chile,Valdivia,Chile.

Neutrophilic bronchiolitis is the primary lesion in asthma-affected horses. Neutrophils are key actors in host defense, migrating toward sites of inflammation and infection, where they act as early responder cells toward external insults. However, neutrophils can also mediate tissue damage in various non-infectious inflammatory processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S146625231800004XDOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Herd-level infectious disease surveillance of livestock populations using aggregate samples.

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 06 21;19(1):53-64. Epub 2018 May 21.

Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory,College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University,Ames,Iowa,USA.

All sectors of livestock production are in the process of shifting from small populations on many farms to large populations on fewer farms. A concurrent shift has occurred in the number of livestock moved across political boundaries. The unintended consequence of these changes has been the appearance of multifactorial diseases that are resistant to traditional methods of prevention and control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252318000038DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Gut immunity: its development and reasons and opportunities for modulation in monogastric production animals.

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 06 29;19(1):46-52. Epub 2018 Apr 29.

Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, USDA-ARS,College Station,TX 77845,USA.

The intestine performs the critical roles of nutrient acquisition, tolerance of innocuous and beneficial microorganisms, while retaining the ability to respond appropriately to undesirable microbes or microbial products and preventing their translocation to more sterile body compartments. Various components contribute to antimicrobial defenses in the intestine. The mucus layer(s), antimicrobial peptides and IgA provide the first line of defense, and seek to trap and facilitate the removal of invading microbes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252318000026DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Antimicrobial resistance: from basic science to translational innovation.

Authors:
Jun Lin

Anim Health Res Rev 2017 12;18(2):85-86

Department of Animal Science,The University of Tennessee,2506 River Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996,USA.

The rise in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) poses a major threat to animal agriculture and human health. To summarize and update current and emerging AMR issues that are significant for animal health and food safety, this issue presents a virtual AMR symposium consisting of seven review papers. These reviews cover a newly described AMR mechanism in Campylobacter, effects of AMR and microbiome on Campylobacter infection, plasmid-mediated colistin resistance in food-producing animals, the impact of point source or antibiotic residues on the environmental resistome, and potential factors influencing horizontal gene transfer in the intestines of food animals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252317000172DOI Listing
December 2017
7 Reads

Prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and residual antimicrobials in the environment in Vietnam.

Anim Health Res Rev 2017 12;18(2):128-135

Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences,Osaka University,1-6, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871,Japan.

Emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli, have become serious problems worldwide. Recent studies conducted in Vietnam revealed that ESBL-producing E. coli are widely distributed in food animals and people. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252317000160DOI Listing
December 2017
4 Reads

Factors influencing horizontal gene transfer in the intestine.

Authors:
Ximin Zeng Jun Lin

Anim Health Res Rev 2017 12;18(2):153-159

Department of Animal Science,The University of Tennessee,2506 River Drive,Knoxville,TN 37996-4574,USA.

Antibiotic resistance (AR) is ancient. Use of antibiotics is a selective driving force that enriches AR genes and promotes the emergence of resistant pathogens. It also has been widely accepted that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) occurs everywhere and plays a critical role in the transmission of AR genes among bacteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252317000159DOI Listing
December 2017
23 Reads

Plasmid-mediated colistin resistance in animals: current status and future directions.

Anim Health Res Rev 2017 12;18(2):136-152

Department of Animal Science,The University of Tennessee,2506 River Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996,USA.

Colistin, a peptide antibiotic belonging to the polymyxin family, is one of the last effective drugs for the treatment of multidrug resistant Gram-negative infections. Recent discovery of a novel mobile colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, from people and food animals has caused a significant public health concern and drawn worldwide attention. Extensive usage of colistin in food animals has been proposed as a major driving force for the emergence and transmission of mcr-1; thus, there is a worldwide trend to limit colistin usage in animal production. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252317000111DOI Listing
December 2017
4 Reads

Effects of antibiotic resistance (AR) and microbiota shifts on Campylobacter jejuni-mediated diseases.

Anim Health Res Rev 2017 12;18(2):99-111

Comparative Enteric Diseases Laboratory,College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University,East Lansing,Michigan,USA.

Campylobacter jejuni is an important zoonotic pathogen recently designated a serious antimicrobial resistant (AR) threat. While most patients with C. jejuni experience hemorrhagic colitis, serious autoimmune conditions can follow including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the acute neuropathy Guillain Barré Syndrome (GBS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252318000014DOI Listing
December 2017
12 Reads

Molecular serogrouping of Escherichia coli.

Anim Health Res Rev 2018 Feb 22:1-16. Epub 2018 Feb 22.

Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences,E. coli Reference Center,The Pennsylvania State University,University Park,PA,USA.

O-antigens present on the surface of Escherichia coli provide antigenic specificity for the strain and are the main components for O-serogroup designation. Serotyping using O-group-specific antisera for the identification of E. coli O-serogroups has been traditionally the gold-standard for distinguishing E. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252317000093DOI Listing
February 2018
3 Reads

Impact of point sources on antibiotic resistance genes in the natural environment: a systematic review of the evidence.

Anim Health Res Rev 2017 12 12;18(2):112-127. Epub 2017 Dec 12.

Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences,University of Minnesota,1971 Commonwealth Avenue,St. Paul,MN 55108,USA.

There is a growing concern about the role of the environment in the dissemination of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARG). In this systematic review, we summarize evidence for increases of ARG in the natural environment associated with potential sources of ARB and ARG such as agricultural facilities and wastewater treatment plants. A total of 5247 citations were identified, including studies that ascertained both ARG and ARB outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S146625231700007XDOI Listing
December 2017
3 Reads

A scoping review of the evidence for efficacy of acupuncture in companion animals.

Anim Health Res Rev 2017 12 11;18(2):177-185. Epub 2017 Dec 11.

Department of Population Medicine,University of Guelph,Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1,Canada.

Acupuncture has become increasingly popular in veterinary medicine. Within the scientific literature there is debate regarding its efficacy. Due to the complex nature of acupuncture, a scoping review was undertaken to identify and categorize the evidence related to acupuncture in companion animals (dogs, cats, and horses). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1466252317000068DOI Listing
December 2017
5 Reads