1,526 results match your criteria Animal Cognition[Journal]


Multimodal signaling in the visuo-acoustic mismatch paradigm: similarities between dogs and children in the communicative approach.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 26. Epub 2020 May 26.

Department of Biology, University of Naples Federico II, 80126, Naples, Italy.

In this review, we have analyzed the studies on the "mismatch paradigm" or "contrasting paradigm", in which the word indicates an intent that is opposite to the gesture in dogs and children. The studies on children highlighted the importance of the type of gestural messages that, when delivered in a non-ostensive manner, assume less value than the verbal indication; whereas, when more emphasis is given to the gestures, it produces opposite results. Word-trained dogs appear to rely more on words, but in the absence of such specific training, dogs rely more on gestures either in transitive or intransitive actions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01398-9DOI Listing

Unwilling or willing but unable: can horses interpret human actions as goal directed?

Anim Cogn 2020 May 24. Epub 2020 May 24.

INRAE, PRC, CNRS, IFCE, Université de Tours, 37380, Nouzilly, France.

Social animals can gain important benefits by inferring the goals behind the behavior of others. However, this ability has only been investigated in a handful of species outside of primates. In this study, we tested for the first time whether domestic horses can interpret human actions as goal directed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01396-xDOI Listing

Claw-in-the-door: pigeons, like humans, display the foot-in-the-door effect.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 21. Epub 2020 May 21.

Department of Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

People are more likely to comply with a large request when it is preceded by another, smaller request, and this is known as the "foot-in-the-door" (FITD). The FITD has been widely studied in social psychology and is thought to arise from mutually conflicting beliefs about past and present behavior (cognitive dissonance) or changes in self-perception. Across two experiments, we found that pigeons' latency to respond to an effortful second stimulus in a pair scales with how much effort they had exerted on the first stimulus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01395-yDOI Listing

The relationship between monoaminergic gene expression, learning, and optimism in red junglefowl chicks.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 21. Epub 2020 May 21.

Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, IFM Biology, Linköping University, 581 83, Linköping, Sweden.

Intra-species cognitive variation is commonly observed, but explanations for why individuals within a species differ in cognition are still understudied and not yet clear. Cognitive processes are likely influenced by genetic differences, with genes in the monoaminergic systems predicted to be important. To explore the potential role of these genes in association with individual variation in cognition, we exposed red junglefowl (Gallus gallus) chicks to behavioural assays measuring variation in learning (discriminative learning, reversal learning, and cognitive flexibility) and optimism (measured in a cognitive judgement bias test). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01394-zDOI Listing

The white-eared opossum failed to understand the parallel strings task: studying a primitive mammal under natural conditions.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 11. Epub 2020 May 11.

Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Moraes Rego, 1235, Cidade Universitária, 50670-901, Recife, PE, Brasil.

The present study aimed to investigate if the white-eared opossum under natural conditions is capable of spontaneously solving the parallel string task. The experimental study with this primitive mammal was carried out on fifteen naïve animals of both sexes in northeastern Brazil. The parallel strings task was arranged in apparatuses with a vertical and a horizontal arrangement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01392-1DOI Listing

Effect of environmental exposure to a maternally-learned odorant on anxiety-like behaviors at weaning in mice.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 11. Epub 2020 May 11.

Université Paris-Saclay, INRAE, NBO, 78350, Jouy-en-Josas, France.

Early sensory experience, such as exposure to maternal or other environmental factors, is considered to influence neurocognitive development and behaviors. In many species, exposure to odorants during pregnancy or lactation impacts the morpho-functional development of the olfactory circuitry with changes in olfactory sensitivity, feeding behavior and food preferences at birth or later. However, few studies have investigated the impact of a perinatal exposure to odorants on the anxiety-like behavior of animals to stressfull stimuli. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01393-0DOI Listing

Post-event misinformation effects in a language-trained chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

Anim Cogn 2020 May 9. Epub 2020 May 9.

Language Research Center, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Errors of source monitoring are widespread human memory challenges, and our memories are subject to distortion upon the presentation of subsequent misinformation. Less is known about if and when misinformation effects occur in nonhuman species' memory. Here we tested a symbol-trained chimpanzee's recall memory of a hidden food item's identity after a 10-min delay. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01391-2DOI Listing

Visual timing abilities of a harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) and a South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) for sub- and supra-second time intervals.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 9. Epub 2020 May 9.

University of Rostock, Institute for Biosciences, Neuroethology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 3, 18059, Rostock, Germany.

Timing is an essential parameter influencing many behaviours. A previous study demonstrated a high sensitivity of a phocid, the harbour seal (Phoca vitulina), in discriminating time intervals. In the present study, we compared the harbour seal's timing abilities with the timing abilities of an otariid, the South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01390-3DOI Listing

An information-theory approach to geometry for animal groups.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 8. Epub 2020 May 8.

Institute of Biology, University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerland.

One of the hardest problems in studying animal behaviour is to quantify patterns of social interaction at the group level. Recent technological developments in global positioning system (GPS) devices have opened up new avenues for locating animals with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Likewise, advances in computing power have enabled new levels of data analyses with complex mathematical models to address unresolved problems in animal behaviour, such as the nature of group geometry and the impact of group-level interactions on individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01374-3DOI Listing

Age influences domestic dog cognitive performance independent of average breed lifespan.

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 30. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA.

Across mammals, increased body size is positively associated with lifespan. However, within species, this relationship is inverted. This is well illustrated in dogs (Canis familiaris), where larger dogs exhibit accelerated life trajectories: growing faster and dying younger than smaller dogs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01385-0DOI Listing

Non-visual homing and the current status of navigation in scorpions.

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 29. Epub 2020 Apr 29.

Institute of Neurobiology, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081, Ulm, Germany.

Within arthropods, the investigation of navigational aspects including homing abilities has mainly focused on insect representatives, while other arthropod taxa have largely been ignored. As such, scorpions are rather underrepresented concerning behavioral studies for reasons such as low participation rates and motivational difficulties. Here, we review the sensory abilities of scorpions related to navigation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01386-zDOI Listing

Daddy, daddy cool: stallion-foal relationships in a socially-natural herd of Exmoor ponies.

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 25. Epub 2020 Apr 25.

Department of Animal Science and Food Processing, Faculty of Tropical AgriSciences, Czech University of Life Sciences, Praha, Czech Republic.

Different forms of direct paternal investment have been described in mammals. One such species where paternal care was noticed, but remains poorly understood, is the horse (Equus caballus), where the male keeps a long-term relationship with several females and offspring. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the interactions between the harem stallion and his foals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01388-xDOI Listing

Social motivation and the use of distal, but not local, featural cues are related to ranging behavior in free-range chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus).

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 25. Epub 2020 Apr 25.

Yncréa Hauts-de-France, ISA Lille, 48 Boulevard Vauban, PO Box: BP 41290, 59046, Lille Cedex, France.

Animals can navigate an environment relying on different sources of information, such as geometrical or featural cues. The favoring of one type of information over another depends on multiple factors, such as inter-individual differences in behavior and cognition. Free-range chickens present different range use patterns, which may be explained by behavioral and cognitive differences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01389-wDOI Listing

The development of problem-solving abilities in a population of candidate detection dogs (Canis familiaris).

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 24. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

Department of Psychological Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA.

Both ontogenetic and phylogenetic factors have shaped dogs' cognitive capabilities, resulting in a heightened social sensitivity at the apparent cost of non-social problem-solving abilities. Research has suggested that training history and life experience can influence problem-solving abilities in dogs. However, the ontogenetic development of problem-solving abilities in dogs has been less explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01387-yDOI Listing
April 2020
2.582 Impact Factor

Multimodal interactions in insect navigation.

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 22. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.

Animals travelling through the world receive input from multiple sensory modalities that could be important for the guidance of their journeys. Given the availability of a rich array of cues, from idiothetic information to input from sky compasses and visual information through to olfactory and other cues (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01383-2DOI Listing

First trial outcome but not training difficulty predicts performance in goldfish visual discrimination.

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 18. Epub 2020 Apr 18.

Department of Psychology, Niagara University, Lewiston, NY, 14109, USA.

The easy-to-hard effect in perceptual learning shows that training with easier examples can facilitate initially difficult or impossible distinctions between very similar stimuli. This effect has been reported in humans and other species. We tested whether easy-to-hard training could facilitate visual discrimination in common goldfish (Carassius auratus). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01380-5DOI Listing

Effect of isotocin on shoaling behaviour of the Guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 17. Epub 2020 Apr 17.

Department of Biology, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada.

Pro-social effects of oxytocin and its homologues are well-documented in birds and mammals. However, in fishes, the effect of isotocin, the homologue of oxytocin, on social behaviour is less clear. Studies in fishes have generally shown no effect of isotocin on social behaviours or even an anti-social effect. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01381-4DOI Listing

The ontogeny of continuous quantity discrimination in zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio).

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 15. Epub 2020 Apr 15.

Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Via Venezia 8, 35131, Padua, Italy.

Several studies have investigated the ontogeny of the capacity to discriminate between discrete numerical information in human and non-human animals. Contrarily, less attention has been devoted to the development of the capacity to discriminate continuous quantities. Recently, we set up a fast procedure for screening continuous quantity abilities in adult individuals of an animal model in neurodevelopmental research, the zebrafish. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01384-1DOI Listing

Dogs (Canis familiaris) recognise our faces in photographs: implications for existing and future research.

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 8. Epub 2020 Apr 8.

Laboratory of Applied Ethology, Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, University of Padua, Viale dell'Università 16, 35020, Legnaro, PD, Italy.

Dogs are an ideal species to investigate phylogenetic and ontogenetic factors contributing to face recognition. Previous research has found that dogs can recognise their owner using visual information about the person's face, presented live. However, a thorough investigation of face processing mechanisms requires the use of graphical representations and it currently remains unclear whether dogs are able to spontaneously recognise human faces in photographs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01382-3DOI Listing

Fears from the past? The innate ability of dogs to detect predator scents.

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 8. Epub 2020 Apr 8.

Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health, University of South-Eastern Norway, Bø, Telemark, Norway.

Throughout the animal kingdom, antipredator mechanisms are an evolutionary driving force to enable the survival of species classified as prey. Information regarding a predator's location can be determined through chemosensory cues from urine, faeces, visual and/or acoustic signals and anal gland secretions; and in several lab and field-based studies it has been seen that these cues mediate behavioural changes within prey species. These behaviours are often linked to fear and avoidance, which will in turn increase the prey's survival rate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01379-yDOI Listing

Effect of large visual changes on the navigation of the nocturnal bull ant, Myrmecia midas.

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 8. Epub 2020 Apr 8.

Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia.

Nocturnal insects have remarkable visual capacities in dim light. They can navigate using both the surrounding panorama and celestial cues. Individual foraging ants are efficient navigators, able to accurately reach a variety of goal locations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01377-0DOI Listing

Food quantity discrimination in puppies (Canis lupus familiaris).

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 6. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

There is considerable evidence that animals are able to discriminate between quantities. Despite the fact that quantitative skills have been extensively studied in adult individuals, research on their development in early life is restricted to a limited number of species. We, therefore, investigated whether 2-month-old puppies could spontaneously discriminate between different quantities of food items. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01378-zDOI Listing

Pigeons (Columba livia) integrate visual motion using the vector average rule: effect of viewing distance.

Anim Cogn 2020 Apr 2. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Department of Psychology, Graduate School of Letters, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo, Kyoto, 606-8501, Japan.

Integrating local motion signals detected by the primary motion detector is crucial for representing a rigid, two-dimensional motion. The nature of motion integration has been studied using stimuli consisting of two superimposed sinusoidal gratings of different orientations, called plaid motion, and it has been shown that humans perceive integrated motion in the direction where the component constraint lines are intersected. We previously found that pigeons and humans perceive different movement directions from plaid motion; pigeons responded to the vector average direction of the gratings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01376-1DOI Listing

The transition of object to mental manipulation: beyond a species-specific view of intelligence.

Anim Cogn 2020 Mar 31. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

Department of Psychology, and Zlotowski Center for Neuroscience, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, Beer Sheva, Israel.

Many attempts have been made to classify and evaluate the nature of intelligence in humans and other species (referred to as the 'g' factor in the former and the G factor in the latter). The search for this essential structure of mental life has generated various models and definitions, yet open questions remain. Specifically, referring to intelligence by overemphasizing the anthropocentric terminology and its ethnocentric overlay is insufficient to account for individual differences and limits its generalizability in biological and cultural contexts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01375-2DOI Listing

Cats show an unexpected pattern of response to human ostensive cues in a series of A-not-B error tests.

Anim Cogn 2020 Mar 29. Epub 2020 Mar 29.

Department of Ethology, Institute of Biology, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/c, Budapest, 1117, Hungary.

It is an intriguing question whether cats' social understanding capacity, including the sensitivity to ostensive signals (resulting in fast preferential learning of behavioural choices demonstrated by humans), would be comparable to that in dogs. In a series of A-not-B error tests, we investigated whether the ostensive or non-ostensive manner of human communication and the familiarity of the human demonstrator would affect the search error pattern in companion cats. Cats' performance showed an almost completely different distribution of perseverative erring than earlier was shown in dogs and human infants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01373-4DOI Listing

Accuracy and spread of nest search behaviour in the Saharan silver ant, Cataglyphis bombycina, and in the salt pan species, Cataglyphis fortis.

Anim Cogn 2020 Mar 27. Epub 2020 Mar 27.

Institute of Neurobiology, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081, Ulm, Germany.

Desert ants of the genus Cataglyphis are renowned for their navigation abilities, especially for their beeline homing after meandering foraging excursions reaching several hundreds of meters in length. A spiralling nest search is performed when an ant misses the nest entrance upon completing its homebound travel. We examined the nest search behaviours of two desert ant species dwelling in different habitats-Cataglyphis bombycina living in the dunes of the Sahara and Cataglyphis fortis found in the salt pans of North Africa. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01371-6DOI Listing

Investigating information seeking in ravens (Corvus corax).

Anim Cogn 2020 Mar 21. Epub 2020 Mar 21.

Department of Philosophy and Cognitive Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.

Measuring the responses of non-human animals to situations of uncertainty is thought to shed light on an animal's metacognitive processes; namely, whether they monitor their own knowledge states. For example, when presented with a foraging task, great apes and macaques selectively seek information about the location of a food item when they have not seen where it was hidden, compared to when they have. We presented this same information seeking task to ravens, in which a food item was hidden in one of three containers, and subjects could either watch where the food was hidden, infer its location through visual or auditory clues, or were given no information. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01372-5DOI Listing

Sex differences in cognitive performance and style across domains in mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis).

Anim Cogn 2020 Mar 12. Epub 2020 Mar 12.

Department of Integrative Biology, University of Texas, 1 University Station C0990, Austin, TX, 78712, USA.

Given that the sexes often differ in their ecological and sexual selection pressures, sex differences in cognitive properties are likely. While research on sexually dimorphic cognition often focuses on performance, it commonly overlooks how sexes diverge across cognitive domains and in behaviors exhibited during a cognitive task (cognitive style). We tested male and female western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) in three cognitive tasks: associative learning (numerical discrimination), cognitive flexibility (detour task), and spatio-temporal learning (shuttlebox). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01367-2DOI Listing

Horses feel emotions when they watch positive and negative horse-human interactions in a video and transpose what they saw to real life.

Anim Cogn 2020 Mar 11. Epub 2020 Mar 11.

INRAE, PRC, CNRS, IFCE, Université de Tours, 37380, Nouzilly, France.

Animals can indirectly gather meaningful information about other individuals by eavesdropping on their third-party interactions. In particular, eavesdropping can be used to indirectly attribute a negative or positive valence to an individual and to adjust one's future behavior towards that individual. Few studies have focused on this ability in nonhuman animals, especially in nonprimate species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01369-0DOI Listing

Oceans of stimuli: an individual-based model to assess the role of olfactory cues and local enhancement in seabirds' foraging behaviour.

Anim Cogn 2020 Mar 9. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

Laboratory of Applied Ecology, CITAB, Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro-Environment and Biological Sciences, University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, 5000-911, Vila Real, Portugal.

Oceans are extremely dynamic environments, which poses challenges for top-predators such as seabirds to find food resources. Yet, seabirds evolved sensorial abilities (olfactory senses) along with complex behaviours (social information transfer through local enhancement) to improve foraging efficiency. Using the Cory's shearwater (Calonectris borealis) as a model species, we developed an individual-based model to explore the complementary role of different searching mechanisms (olfactory foraging and local enhancement) for the optimal foraging behaviour of pelagic seabirds during 1-day foraging trips around breeding colonies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01368-1DOI Listing

Seasonal variation of sexually dimorphic spatial learning implicates mating system in the intertidal Cocos Frillgoby (Bathygobius cocosensis).

Anim Cogn 2020 Mar 7. Epub 2020 Mar 7.

Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW, 2109, Australia.

Spatial learning is an important cognitive function found across a multitude of species. Natural selection can enhance specific cognitive abilities depending on species ecology but, under certain conditions, spatial learning is also known to vary between sexes according to reproductive status. Despite abundant studies on spatial learning across animal taxa, those focusing on sexually dimorphic spatial learning have been largely limited to rodents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01366-3DOI Listing

Effects of incubation temperatures on learning abilities of hatchling velvet geckos.

Anim Cogn 2020 Mar 4. Epub 2020 Mar 4.

School of Life Sciences, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, 2007, Australia.

Stressful environments in utero can have a profound influence on cognitive functions and learning ability. In lizards, thermal environments experienced by embryos can shape a range of traits, including sex, body size, and locomotor performance, which may influence fitness. Recent studies suggest that incubation temperatures may also influence brain development and learning ability of some lizard species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01365-4DOI Listing

Acoustic discrimination of predators by black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus).

Anim Cogn 2020 May 27;23(3):595-611. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Department of Psychology, University of Alberta, P-217 Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada.

Smaller owls and hawks are high-threat predators to small songbirds, like chickadees, in comparison to larger avian predators due to smaller raptors' agility (Templeton et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci 104:5479-5482, 2005). The current literature focuses only on high- and low-threat predators. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01364-5DOI Listing

Marmoset prosociality is intentional.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 27;23(3):581-594. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Department of Anthropology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057, Zürich, Switzerland.

Marmoset monkeys show high levels of proactive prosociality, a trait shared with humans, presumably because both species rely on allomaternal care. However, it is not clear whether the proximate regulation of this convergent trait is also similar, in particular with regard to intentionality, which is a defining characteristic of prosocial behavior in the human literature. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether marmoset monkeys' prosociality fulfils the criteria of intentionality developed in primate communication research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01363-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7181450PMC

Odor span task in dogs (Canis familiaris).

Anim Cogn 2020 May 25;23(3):571-580. Epub 2020 Feb 25.

Department of Psychology, Auburn University, 226 Thach Hall, Auburn, 36849 AL, USA.

Working memory is essential for organisms to solve problems related to their survival and to adapt to changes in their environment. Researchers sought to create a non-human model of working memory that could be used to better understand its predictive value and underlying brain function. Several of these studies were conducted using the odor span task (OST) with rodents, and here, we present the first OST with domestic dogs (n = 6). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01362-7DOI Listing
May 2020
2.582 Impact Factor

Why do dogs look back at the human in an impossible task? Looking back behaviour may be over-interpreted.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 23;23(3):427-441. Epub 2020 Feb 23.

Domestication Lab, Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.

The impossible task paradigm has been extensively used to study the looking back behaviour in dogs. This behaviour is commonly considered a social problem-solving strategy: dogs facing an unsolvable task, soon give up and look back at the experimenter to ask for help. We aimed to test if the looking back in an impossible task does indeed represent a social problem-solving strategy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01345-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7181563PMC

Pigeons can learn a difficult discrimination if reinforcement is delayed following choice.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 21;23(3):503-508. Epub 2020 Feb 21.

Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40506, USA.

Delaying reinforcement typically has been thought to retard the rate of acquisition of an association, but there is evidence that it may facilitate acquisition of some difficult simultaneous discriminations. After describing several cases in which delaying reinforcement can facilitate acquisition, we suggest that under conditions in which the magnitude of reinforcement is difficult to discriminate, the introduction of a delay between choice and reinforcement can facilitate the discrimination. In the present experiment, we tested the hypothesis that the discrimination between one pellet of food for choice of one alternative and two pellets of food for choice of another may be a difficult discrimination when choice consists of a single peck. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01352-9DOI Listing

Pheromone cue triggers switch between vectors in the desert harvest ant, Veromessor pergandei.

Anim Cogn 2020 Feb 20. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

Department of Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2R3, Canada.

The desert harvester ant (Veromessor pergandei) employs a mixture of social and individual navigational strategies at separate stages of their foraging trip. Individuals leave the nest along a pheromone-based column, travelling 3-40 m before spreading out to forage individually in a fan. Foragers use path integration while in this fan, accumulating a direction and distance estimate (vector) to return to the end of the column (column head), yet foragers' potential use of path integration in the pheromone-based column is less understood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01354-7DOI Listing
February 2020

Multi-modal cue integration in the black garden ant.

Anim Cogn 2020 Feb 19. Epub 2020 Feb 19.

Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.

In a constantly changing environment, it is advantageous for animals to encode a location (such as a food source) relying on more than one single cue. A certain position might, in fact, be signalled by the presence of information acquired through different sensory modalities which may be integrated into cohesive memories. Here, we aimed to investigate multi-sensory learning capabilities and multi-modal information integration in Lasius niger ants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01360-9DOI Listing
February 2020

How does the expressiveness of leaders affect followership in domestic horses (Equus ferus caballus)?

Anim Cogn 2020 May 17;23(3):559-569. Epub 2020 Feb 17.

Cognitive and Social Ethology Group, CNRS, UMR 7247 Physiologie de La Reproduction Et Des Comportements, 37380, Nouzilly, France.

In collective movements, some individuals are more effective and attractive leaders than others. Parameters such as social network, personality, and physiologic needs failed to explain why group members follow one leader more than another. In this study in the domestic horse, we propose to focus on the leader's attitude and its impact to the followers' recruitment during two conditions: spontaneous group departures or experimentally induced departures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01361-8DOI Listing

Dogs wait longer for better rewards than wolves in a delay of gratification task: but why?

Anim Cogn 2020 May 14;23(3):443-453. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Wolf Science Center, Domestication Lab, Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Savoyenstraße 1a, 1160, Vienna, Austria.

Self-control has been shown to be linked with being cooperative and successful in humans and with the g-factor in chimpanzees. As such, it is likely to play an important role in all forms of problem-solving. Self-control, however, does not just vary across individuals but seems also to be dependent on the ecological niche of the respective species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01346-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7181554PMC

Spatial cognition in western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla): an analysis of distance, linearity, and speed of travel routes.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 14;23(3):545-557. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA.

Spatial memory allows animals to retain information regarding the location, distribution, and quality of feeding sites to optimize foraging decisions. Western gorillas inhabit a complex environment with spatiotemporal fluctuations of resource availability, prefer fruits when available, and travel long distances to reach them. Here, we examined movement patterns-such as linearity, distance, and speed of traveling-to assess whether gorillas optimize travel when reaching out-of-sight valued resources. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01358-3DOI Listing

Perception of dynamic facial expressions of emotion between dogs and humans.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 12;23(3):465-476. Epub 2020 Feb 12.

School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, UK.

Facial expressions are a core component of the emotional response of social mammals. In contrast to Darwin's original proposition, expressive facial cues of emotion appear to have evolved to be species-specific. Faces trigger an automatic perceptual process, and so, inter-specific emotion perception is potentially a challenge; since observers should not try to "read" heterospecific facial expressions in the same way that they do conspecific ones. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01348-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7181561PMC

Revisiting more or less: influence of numerosity and size on potential prey choice in the domestic cat.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 12;23(3):491-501. Epub 2020 Feb 12.

Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70228, CP 04510, Mexico City, Mexico.

Quantity discrimination is of adaptive relevance in a wide range of contexts and across a wide range of species. Trained domestic cats can discriminate between different numbers of dots, and we have shown that they also spontaneously choose between different numbers and sizes of food balls. In the present study we performed two experiments with 24 adult cats to investigate spontaneous quantity discrimination in the more naturalistic context of potential predation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01351-wDOI Listing

The effect of spatially restricted experience on extrapolating learned views in desert ants, Melophorus bagoti.

Anim Cogn 2020 Feb 12. Epub 2020 Feb 12.

Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia.

Desert ants are known for learning walks at the beginning of their foraging life, during which they learn terrestrial cues of the panorama and surrounding landmarks around their nest. Foragers retain memories of the visual cues of the nest panorama learned during the pre-foraging trials. When away from the nest, they can compare these stored views with their current vision to return to their nest. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01359-2DOI Listing
February 2020
2.582 Impact Factor

Guppies show sex and individual differences in the ability to inhibit behaviour.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 7;23(3):535-543. Epub 2020 Feb 7.

Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, Via Borsari 46, 44121, Ferrara, Italy.

In humans, individual and sex differences have been long reported for several cognitive tasks and are at least in part due to variability in the function that inhibits behaviour (i.e. inhibitory control). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01357-4DOI Listing

Performance of blue-fronted amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva) when solving the pebbles-and-seeds and multi-access-box paradigms: ex situ and in situ experiments.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 7;23(3):455-464. Epub 2020 Feb 7.

Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Animal, Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco. Avenida Professor Moraes Rego, 1235, Cidade Universitária, Recife, PE, 50670-901, Brazil.

Birds can solve many cognitive tasks that were previously only solved by primates, implying that their cognitive ability is far greater than expected. Here, we investigated the ability of blue-fronted amazon parrots in solving the pebble-and-seed and the multi-access-box paradigms, two ecologically relevant cognitive tasks varying in complexity and required skills to solve. We also investigated whether laterality, sex and housing conditions influenced problem-solving capacity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01347-6DOI Listing

Effects of string length on the organization of rat string-pulling behavior.

Anim Cogn 2020 Mar 7;23(2):415-425. Epub 2020 Feb 7.

Department of Psychology, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA.

The string-pulling paradigm has been adapted to investigate many psychological phenomena across a range of animal species. Although varying string length has been shown to influence performance, the nature of the representation remains to be determined. Across three experiments, rats were shaped to pull string to receive food reinforcement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01349-4DOI Listing

Animal cognition in the field: performance of wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) on a reversal learning task.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 5;23(3):523-534. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Anthropology, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON, M1C 1A4, Canada.

Increasingly, researchers are moving animal cognitive research into wild field settings. A field-based approach offers a valuable complement to laboratory-based studies, as it enables researchers to work with animals in their natural environments and indicates whether cognitive abilities found in captive subjects are generalizable to wild animals. It is thus important to field-based research to clarify which cognitive tasks can be replicated in wild settings, which species are suitable for testing in the wild, and whether replication produces similar results in wild animals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01356-5DOI Listing

Sex differences in vocalization are reflected by event-related potential components in the music frog.

Anim Cogn 2020 May 3;23(3):477-490. Epub 2020 Feb 3.

Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 9 Section 4, Renmin Nan Road, Chengdu, 610041, Sichuan, People's Republic of China.

Sex differences in vocalization have been commonly found in vocal animals. It remains unclear, however, how animals perceive and discriminate these differences. The amplitudes and latencies of event-related potentials (ERP) components can reflect the auditory processing efficiency and time course. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-020-01350-xDOI Listing
May 2020
2.582 Impact Factor