1,392 results match your criteria Animal Cognition[Journal]


Inhibitory control and memory in the search process for a modified problem in grey squirrels, Sciurus carolinensis.

Anim Cogn 2019 Apr 11. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Department of Psychology, Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK.

Inhibiting learned behaviours when they become unproductive and searching for an alternative solution to solve a familiar but different problem are two indicators of flexibility in problem solving. A wide range of animals show these tendencies spontaneously, but what kind of search process is at play behind their problem-solving success? Here, we investigated how Eastern grey squirrels, Sciurus carolinensis, solved a modified mechanical problem that required them to abandon their preferred and learned solution and search for alternative solutions to retrieve out-of-reach food rewards. Squirrels could solve the problem by engaging in either an exhaustive search (i. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10071-019-01261-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01261-6DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

What do wild saiga antelopes tell us about the relative roles of the two brain hemispheres in social interactions?

Anim Cogn 2019 Apr 8. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Faculty of Biology, Saint Petersburg State University, Universitetskaya Nab., 7-9, Saint Petersburg, 199034, Russia.

Two brain hemispheres are unequally involved in the processing of social stimuli, as demonstrated in a wide range of vertebrates. A considerable number of studies have shown the right hemisphere advantage for social processing. At the same time, an approach-withdrawal hypothesis, mainly based on experimental evidence, proposes the involvement of both brain hemispheres according to approach and withdrawal motivation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01259-0DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Speed-accuracy trade-off, detour reaching and response to PHA in Carib grackles.

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 30. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

Department of Biology, McGill University, 1205, avenue Docteur, Montréal, Québec, H3A 1B1, Canada.

Performance on different cognitive tasks varies between individuals within species. Recent evidence suggests that, in some species, this variation reflects the existence of coherent cognitive strategies bringing together positive and negative relationships between tasks. For example, Carib grackles show a speed-accuracy trade-off, where individuals that are fast at solving novel problems make more errors at discrimination learning than individuals that are slow solvers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01258-1DOI Listing

Transitive inference in pigeons may result from differential tendencies to reject the test stimuli acquired during training.

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 29. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA.

In the five-term, transitive inference task used with animals, pigeons are trained on four simultaneous discrimination premise pairs: A + B -, B + C -, C + D -, D + E -. Typically, when tested with the BD pair, most pigeons show a transitive inference effect, choosing B over D. Two non-inferential hypotheses have been proposed to account for this effect but neither has been reliably supported by research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01257-2DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Where to place the rewards? Exploration bias in mice influences performance in the classic hole-board spatial memory test.

Anim Cogn 2019 May 9;22(3):433-443. Epub 2019 Mar 9.

Insituto de Investigación Biomédica de Málaga-IBIMA, Malaga, Spain.

The classic hole-board paradigm (a square arena with 16 holes arranged equidistantly in a 4 × 4 pattern) assesses both exploration and spatial memory in rodents. For spatial memory training, food rewards are hidden in a fixed set of holes. The animal must not visit (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01256-3DOI Listing

Topological spatial representation in wild chacma baboons (Papio ursinus).

Anim Cogn 2019 May 9;22(3):397-412. Epub 2019 Mar 9.

Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Durham, UK.

Many species orient towards specific locations to reach important resources using different cognitive mechanisms. Some of these, such as path integration, are now well understood, but the cognitive orientation mechanisms that underlie movements in non-human primates remain the subject of debate. To investigate whether movements of chacma baboons are more consistent with Euclidean or topological spatial awareness, we investigated whether baboons made repeated use of the same network of pathways and tested three predictions resulting from the hypothesized use of Euclidean and topological spatial awareness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01253-6DOI Listing

Guppies, Poecilia reticulata, perceive a reversed Delboeuf illusion.

Anim Cogn 2019 May 8;22(3):291-303. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Padua, Italy.

Animals are often required to estimate object sizes during several fitness-related activities, such as choosing mates, foraging, and competing for resources. Some species are susceptible to size illusions, i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01237-6DOI Listing

The cocktail party effect in the domestic dog (Canis familiaris).

Anim Cogn 2019 May 8;22(3):423-432. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

University of Maryland, College Park, USA.

Like humans, canine companions often find themselves in noisy environments, and are expected to respond to human speech despite potential distractors. Such environments pose particular problems for young children, who have limited linguistic knowledge. Here, we examined whether dogs show similar difficulties. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01255-4DOI Listing

Developmental history, energetic state and choice impulsivity in European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris.

Anim Cogn 2019 May 6;22(3):413-421. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Centre for Behaviour and Evolution and Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK.

Impulsivity-the extent to which a reward is devalued by the amount of time until it is realized-can be affected by an individual's current energetic state and long-term developmental history. In European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), a previous study found that birds that were lighter for their skeletal size, and birds that had undergone greater shortening of erythrocyte telomeres over the course of development, were more impulsive as adults. Here, we studied the impulsivity of a separate cohort of 29 starlings hand-reared under different combinations of food amount and begging effort. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01254-5DOI Listing

Exploratory study of the effects of intra-uterine growth retardation and neonatal energy supplementation of low birth-weight piglets on their post-weaning cognitive abilities.

Anim Cogn 2019 May 28;22(3):373-385. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Animal Behaviour and Welfare Team, Animal and Veterinary Sciences Research Group, SRUC, West Mains Road, EH9 3JG, Edinburgh, UK.

The present study investigated the effects of intra-uterine growth retardation (IUGR, score 0-3; i.e., "normal" to "severe") level at birth, and the effects of neonatal energy supplementation (dosed with 2 ml of coconut oil, commercial product or water, or sham-dosed), on post-weaning cognitive abilities of low birth-weight piglets (< 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01251-8DOI Listing

Behavioral flexibility of a generalist carnivore.

Anim Cogn 2019 May 25;22(3):387-396. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA.

Innovative problem solving, repeated innovation, learning, and inhibitory control are cognitive abilities commonly regarded as important components of behaviorally flexible species. Animals exhibiting these cognitive abilities may be more likely to adapt to the unique demands of living in novel and rapidly changing environments, such as urbanized landscapes. Raccoons (Procyon lotor) are an abundant, generalist species frequently found in urban habitats, and are capable of innovative problem solving, which makes them an ideal species to assess their behavioral flexibility. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01252-7DOI Listing
May 2019
2 Reads

Influence of theatre hall layout on actors' and spectators' emotions.

Anim Cogn 2019 May 20;22(3):365-372. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

CNRS, Univ Rennes, Normandie Univ, EthoS (Ethologie animale et humaine), UMR 6552, 35380, Paimpont, France.

"Audience effect" is the influence of an audience size or composition on the emotional state of a public speaker. One characteristic of the audience which has received little attention is the spatial position of observers. We tested the influence of three positions (frontal, bi-frontal, and quadri-frontal) on actors and spectators' emotions in real theatrical representations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01249-2DOI Listing

Scent marks of rodents can provide information to conspecifics.

Authors:
Michael H Ferkin

Anim Cogn 2019 May 18;22(3):445-452. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Memphis, Ellington Hall, Memphis, TN, 38152, USA.

For a scent mark to be informative it must provide a reliable, honest signal that allows individuals that detect it to predict fitness tradeoffs if they choose or not choose to respond to it. I argue that scent marks provide a great deal of information about the sender to receivers. The manner in which an animal uses this information to make decisions will depend on the context and manner in which it encounters these scent marks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01250-9DOI Listing

Private information conflict: Lasius niger ants prefer olfactory cues to route memory.

Anim Cogn 2019 May 15;22(3):355-364. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Animal Comparative Economics Laboratory, Department of Zoology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany.

Foraging animals use a variety of information sources to navigate, such as memorised views or odours associated with a goal. Animals frequently use different information sources concurrently, to increase navigation accuracy or reliability. While much research has focussed on conflicts between individually learned (private) information and social information, conflicts between private information sources have been less broadly studied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01248-3DOI Listing

Social learning about construction behaviour via an artefact.

Anim Cogn 2019 May 14;22(3):305-315. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Harold Mitchell Building, St Andrews, KY16 9TH, UK.

One source of public information may be the enduring products of others' behaviour, such as discarded tools or vacated nests. Here, we examined whether observation of a nest affects the material captive zebra finch males prefer when they construct their first nest. It does: for first-time nest construction, males that viewed only an empty cage preferred the colour of material each initially favoured but those males that had observed a pre-built nest of material of their non-preferred colour lost their material-colour preference altogether. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01240-xDOI Listing

Dissociation of memory signals for metamemory in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

Anim Cogn 2019 May 14;22(3):331-341. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Psychology, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, 36 Eagle Row, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA.

Some nonhuman species demonstrate metamemory, the ability to monitor and control memory. Here, we identify memory signals that control metamemory judgments in rhesus monkeys by directly comparing performance in two metamemory paradigms while holding the availability of one memory signal constant and manipulating another. Monkeys performed a four-choice match-to-sample memory task. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10071-019-01246-5
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01246-5DOI Listing
May 2019
5 Reads

Navigation strategies in three nocturnal lemur species: diet predicts heuristic use and degree of exploratory behavior.

Anim Cogn 2019 May 13;22(3):343-354. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Animal Behavior Graduate Group, University of California Davis, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA, 95616-8522, USA.

Humans generally solve multi-destination routes with simple rules-of-thumb. Animals may do the same, but strong evidence is limited to a few species. We examined whether strepsirrhines, who diverged from haplorhines more than 58 mya, would demonstrate the use of three heuristics used by humans and supported in vervets, the nearest neighbor rule, the convex hull, and a cluster strategy, when solving a multi-destination route. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01247-4DOI Listing

Context-specific response inhibition and differential impact of a learning bias in a lizard.

Anim Cogn 2019 May 1;22(3):317-329. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW, 2109, Sydney, Australia.

Response inhibition (inhibiting prepotent responses) is needed for reaching a more favourable goal in situations where reacting automatically would be detrimental. Inhibiting prepotent responses to resist the temptation of a stimulus in certain situations, such as a novel food item, can directly affect an animal's survival. In humans and dogs, response inhibition varies between contexts and between individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01245-6DOI Listing

Precise relative-quantity judgement in the striped field mouse Apodemus agrarius Pallas.

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 1;22(2):277-289. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl, Moscow, 123182, Russia.

Applying the classical experimental scheme of training animals with food rewards to discriminate between quantities of visual stimuli, we demonstrated that not only can striped field mice Apodemus agrarius discriminate between clearly distinctive quantities such as 5 and 10, but some of these mice also exhibit high accuracy in discriminating between quantities that differ only by one. The latter include both small (such as 2 versus 3) and relatively large (such as 5 versus 6, and 8 versus 9) quantities of elements. This is the first evidence of precise relative-quantity judgement in wild rodents. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10071-019-01244-7
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01244-7DOI Listing
March 2019
12 Reads

Tortoises develop and overcome position biases in a reversal learning task.

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 1;22(2):265-275. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Biological Sciences, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, L2S 3A1, Canada.

The capability of animals to alter their behaviour in response to novel or familiar stimuli, or behavioural flexibility, is strongly associated with their ability to learn in novel environments. Reptiles are capable of learning complex tasks and offer a unique opportunity to study the relationship between visual proficiency and behavioural flexibility. The focus of this study was to investigate the behavioural flexibility of red-footed tortoises and their ability to perform reversal learning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01243-8DOI Listing

Test of four hypotheses to explain the function of overmarking in foals of four equid species.

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 30;22(2):231-241. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Ethology, Institute of Animal Science, Přátelství 815, 104 00, Prague, Uhříněves, Czech Republic.

Overmarking occurs when one individual places its scent mark directly on top of the scent mark of another individual. Although it is almost ubiquitous among terrestrial mammals, we know little about the function of overmarking. In addition, almost all studies on mammalian overmarking behaviour dealt with adult individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01239-4DOI Listing

Spatial mapping shows that some African elephants use cognitive maps to navigate the core but not the periphery of their home ranges.

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 28;22(2):251-263. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Center for Geospatial Research, University of Georgia, 210 Field Street, Athens, GA, 30602, USA.

Strategies of navigation have been shown to play a critical role when animals revisit resource sites across large home ranges. The habitual route system appears to be a sufficient strategy for animals to navigate while avoiding the cognitive cost of traveling using the Euclidean map. We hypothesize that wild elephants travel more frequently using habitual routes to revisit resource sites as opposed to using the Euclidean map. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01242-9DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Running paths to nowhere: repetition of routes shows how navigating ants modulate online the weights accorded to cues.

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 25;22(2):213-222. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia.

Ants are expert navigators, keeping track of the vector to home as they travel, through path integration, and using terrestrial panoramas in view-based navigation. Although insect learning has been much studied, the learning processes in navigation have not received much attention. Here, we investigate in desert ants (Melophorus bagoti) the effects of repeating a well-travelled and familiar route segment without success. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01236-7DOI Listing

Pet dogs exhibit social preference for people who synchronize with them: what does it tell us about the evolution of behavioral synchronization?

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 25;22(2):243-250. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Cognitive Psychology Laboratory (UMR 7290), 3C Research Federation, Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, 3 Place Victor Hugo, CS 80249, Bât. 9, Case D, 13331, Marseilles Cedex 03, France.

Humans show greater affiliation with people who are behaviorally synchronized with them but little is known about the impact of synchronization at an interspecific level. We, therefore, explored whether the synchronization of humans with dogs affects dogs' human preferences. Pet dogs were exposed to two unfamiliar persons: one synchronized her walking behavior with them and one walked randomly. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01241-wDOI Listing

Discrimination of group numerousness under predation risk in anuran tadpoles.

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 23;22(2):223-230. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, 38068, Rovereto, Italy.

For social animals, group size discrimination may play a major role in setting the trade-off between the costs and benefits of membership. Several anuran tadpoles show different degrees of social aggregation when exposed to the risk of predation. Despite the importance of aggregative behaviour as an anti-predatory response, the mechanism underlying tadpole choice of the group to join to has not been sufficiently investigated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01238-5DOI Listing

Bats increase vocal amplitude and decrease vocal complexity to mitigate noise interference during social communication.

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 10;22(2):199-212. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Department of Neurology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA.

Natural background noises are common in the acoustic environments in which most organisms have evolved. Therefore, the vocalization and sound perception systems of vocal animals are inherently equipped to overcome natural background noise. Human-generated noises, however, pose new challenges that can hamper audiovocal communication. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-01235-0DOI Listing

Absolute brain size predicts dog breed differences in executive function.

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 3;22(2):187-198. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 85719, USA.

Large-scale phylogenetic studies of animal cognition have revealed robust links between absolute brain volume and species differences in executive function. However, past comparative samples have been composed largely of primates, which are characterized by evolutionarily derived neural scaling rules. Therefore, it is currently unknown whether positive associations between brain volume and executive function reflect a broad-scale evolutionary phenomenon, or alternatively, a unique consequence of primate brain evolution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-01234-1DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

A dyadic brain model of ape gestural learning, production and representation.

Anim Cogn 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

USC Brain Project, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90089-2520, USA.

It has been argued that variation in gesture usage among apes is influenced either by differential sampling of an innate 'gesture space' (Hobaiter and Byrne in Anim Cogn 14:745-767, 2011) or through the 'mutual shaping of behavior' (Halina et al. in Anim Cogn 16(4):653-666, 2013) referred to as ontogenetic ritualization. In either case, learning must play some role in how individuals come to use particular gestures-either through reinforcement within the set of innately specified gestures, or through the ritualization of some action following periods of direct interaction between pairs of individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1228-5DOI Listing
January 2019

Evolutionary origins of money categorization and exchange: an experimental investigation in tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.).

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 2;22(2):169-186. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie della Cognizione, CNR, Rome, Italy.

Money is a cultural artefact with a central role in human society. Here, we investigated whether some features of money may be traced back to the exchange habits of nonhuman animals, capitalizing on their ability to flexibly use tokens in different domains. In Experiment 1, we evaluated whether capuchins can recognize token validity. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10071-018-01233-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-01233-2DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Do cuttlefish have fraction number sense?

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 2;22(2):163-168. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Institute of Systems Neuroscience, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsin-chu, 30013, Taiwan.

Number sense is a key cognitive function in animals. The biological functions of number discrimination have a wide range, including the selection of prey and social interaction. In a previous study, we have shown that cuttlefish are able to distinguish numerical differences among various integers, including 1 vs. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10071-018-01232-3
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-01232-3DOI Listing
March 2019
8 Reads

Does a cichlid fish process face holistically? Evidence of the face inversion effect.

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 2;22(2):153-162. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Laboratory of Animal Sociology, Department of Biology and Geosciences, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi, Sugimoto 3-3-138, Osaka, 558-8585, Japan.

Faces are the most important body part for differentiating among human individuals by humans. Humans read the face as a whole, rather than looking at its parts, which makes it more difficult to recognise inverted faces than upright. Some other mammals also identify each other based on the upright face and take longer to recognise inverted faces. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-01231-4DOI Listing

Gaze following in an asocial reptile (Eublepharis macularius).

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 22;22(2):145-152. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Peel Building, Salford, M5 4WT, UK.

Gaze following is the ability to utilise information from another's gaze. It is most often seen in a social context or as a reflexive response to interesting external stimuli. Social species can potentially reveal utilisable knowledge about another's future intentions by attending to the target of their gaze. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1230-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6373252PMC

Numerical ability in fish species: preference between shoals of different sizes varies among singletons, conspecific dyads and heterospecific dyads.

Anim Cogn 2019 Mar 12;22(2):133-143. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Laboratory of Evolutionary Physiology and Behavior, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Animal Biology, Chongqing Normal University, Chongqing, 401331, China.

Group living confers ecological benefits, and the associated fitness gain may be positively related to the size of the group. Thus, the ability to discriminate numerical differences may confer important fitness advantages in social fish. There is evidence that this ability can be improved by behavioral interactions among individuals of the same species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1229-4DOI Listing

Manipulating social cues in baboon gesture learning: what does it tell us about the evolution of communication?

Anim Cogn 2019 Jan 30;22(1):113-125. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

Station de Primatologie (UPS 846), CNRS, Rousset, France.

Reading the attentional state of an audience is crucial for effective intentional communication. This study investigates how individual learning experience affects subsequent ability to tailor gestural communication to audience visual attention. Olive baboons were atypically trained to request food with gestures by a human standing in profile, while not having access to her face. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10071-018-1227-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1227-6DOI Listing
January 2019
12 Reads

Developmental history and stress responsiveness are related to response inhibition, but not judgement bias, in a cohort of European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

Anim Cogn 2019 Jan 23;22(1):99-111. Epub 2018 Nov 23.

Centre for Behaviour and Evolution and Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK.

Judgement bias tasks are designed to provide markers of affective states. A recent study of European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) demonstrated modest familial effects on judgement bias performance, and found that adverse early experience and developmental telomere attrition (an integrative marker of biological age) both affected judgement bias. Other research has shown that corticosterone levels affect judgement bias. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1226-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6327078PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Environmental enrichment influences spatial learning ability in captive-reared intertidal gobies (Bathygobius cocosensis).

Anim Cogn 2019 Jan 22;22(1):89-98. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW, 2109, Australia.

Behavioural plasticity is an advantageous trait for animals living in dynamic environments, and can be induced through learning. While some behavioural traits are innate, others are framed by experience and learning during an individual's lifetime. Many studies have investigated cognitive abilities in fish species from contrasting environments, but the relative contribution of natural selection versus behavioural plasticity in cognitive variability remains equivocal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1225-8DOI Listing
January 2019

Individuality in coo calls of adult male golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in a multilevel society.

Anim Cogn 2019 Jan 20;22(1):71-79. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

College of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, China.

Vocal individuality is a prerequisite for individual recognition, especially when visual and chemical cues are not available or effective. Vocalizations encoding information of individual identity have been reported in many social animals and should be particularly adaptive for species living in large and complexly organized societies. Here, we examined the individuality in coo calls of adult male golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in a large and multilevel society. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1222-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6326966PMC
January 2019
11 Reads

Contrast between what is expected and what occurs increases pigeon's suboptimal choice.

Anim Cogn 2019 Jan 14;22(1):81-87. Epub 2018 Nov 14.

Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40506-0044, USA.

When pigeons are given a choice between 50% signaled reinforcement and 100% reinforcement they typically do not choose optimally, sometimes even preferring 50% reinforcement. Smith and Zentall (J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process 42:212-220, 2016) proposed that choice depends primarily on the predictive value of the signal for reinforcement associated with each alternative (both 100% reinforcement) and not the frequency of the signal for reinforcement (50% vs. 100%). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1223-xDOI Listing
January 2019

Training improves inhibitory control in water rescue dogs.

Anim Cogn 2019 Jan 12;22(1):127-131. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

Department of Biology, University of Naples Federico II, Via Cinthia, 80126, Naples, Italy.

Inhibitory control is a collection of several processes that are aimed to refrain from any impulsive response in the subject during inappropriate situations. Evidence suggests that in dogs, the inhibitory control is affected by domestication process, but also experiences during ontogeny could be an important driver in acquiring inhibitory control. The aim of the study was to compare the performance of highly trained dogs (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1224-9DOI Listing
January 2019

Olfactory discrimination between litter mates by mothers and alien adult cats: lump or split?

Anim Cogn 2019 Jan 31;22(1):61-69. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico, Mexico.

Mother cats can discriminate between their own and alien kittens using kittens' body odour. Here we ask whether they can also distinguish between body odours of kittens from the same litter. We conducted three experiments using the habituation-dishabituation technique with the odour of 1- and 7-week-old kittens of both sexes. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10071-018-1221-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1221-zDOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Sight or smell: which senses do scavenging raptors use to find food?

Anim Cogn 2019 Jan 26;22(1):49-59. Epub 2018 Oct 26.

CEFE UMR 5175, CNRS-Université de Montpellier-Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier-EPHE-1919 Route de Mende, 34293, Montpellier Cedex 5, France.

Raptors are usually considered to be mainly visually dependent, and the use of other sensory modalities has rarely been studied in these birds. Here, we investigated experimentally which senses (vision and/or olfaction) Turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) and Southern caracaras (Caracara plancus) use to find hidden food. First, two identical stainless-steel perforated balls, one containing a putrefied piece of meat and the other an odorless control, were presented to birds in binary choice experiments. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10071-018-1220-0
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1220-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6326982PMC
January 2019
11 Reads

Persistence in gestural communication predicts sociality in wild chimpanzees.

Anim Cogn 2018 Oct 19. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Department of Psychology, University of Chester, Parkgate Road, Chester, CH1 4BJ, UK.

A key challenge for primates is coordinating behaviour with conspecifics in large, complex social groups. Gestures play a key role in this process and chimpanzees show considerable flexibility communicating through single gestures, sequences of gestures interspersed with periods of response waiting (persistence), and rapid sequences where gestures are made in quick succession, too rapid for the response waiting to have occurred. The previous studies examined behavioural reactions to single gestures and sequences, but whether this complexity is associated with more complex sociality at the level of the dyad partner and the group as a whole is not well understood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1219-6DOI Listing
October 2018

Odometry and backtracking: social and individual navigation in group foraging desert harvester ants (Veromessor pergandei).

Anim Cogn 2019 Jan 17;22(1):35-47. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Department of Psychology, University of Alberta, BSP-217, T6G 2E9, Edmonton, Canada.

Veromessor pergandei harvester ants are group foragers which use a combination of social cues (pheromone-marked columns) and individual cues (e.g., self-generated movement, visual cues) when exploring foraging areas for resources. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1218-7DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Stereotypic horses (Equus caballus) are not cognitively impaired.

Anim Cogn 2019 Jan 17;22(1):17-33. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zürich, Universitätsstrasse 2, 8092, Zurich, Switzerland.

Stereotypies in animals are thought to arise from an interaction between genetic predisposition and sub-optimal housing conditions. In domestic horses, a well-studied stereotypy is crib-biting, an abnormal behaviour that appears to help individuals to cope with stressful situations. One prominent hypothesis states that animals affected by stereotypies are cognitively less flexible compared to healthy controls, due to sensitization of a specific brain area, the basal ganglia. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10071-018-1217-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1217-8DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Dogs and wolves do not differ in their inhibitory control abilities in a non-social test battery.

Anim Cogn 2019 Jan 3;22(1):1-15. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

Domestication Lab, Wolf Science Center, Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Savoyenstraße 1a, 1160, Vienna, Austria.

Being able to inhibit certain behaviours is of clear advantage in various situations. In particular, it has been suggested that inhibitory control plays a role in problem-solving and cooperation. Interspecific differences in the capacity for inhibitory control have been attributed to social and ecological factors, while one additional factor, namely domestication, has received only little attention so far. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1216-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6326967PMC
January 2019

Correction to: Conformism in the food processing techniques of white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus).

Authors:
Susan Perry

Anim Cogn 2018 11;21(6):821-822

Department of Anthropology, Behavior, Evolution and Culture Program, University of California-Los Angeles, 341 Haines Hall, 375 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1553, USA.

The original article shows incorrect values for 'Coef. and Robust SE' under the heading. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1215-xDOI Listing
November 2018

Quantity discrimination in fish species: fish use non-numerical continuous quantity traits to select shoals.

Anim Cogn 2018 Nov 21;21(6):813-820. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Laboratory of Evolutionary Physiology and Behavior, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Animal Biology, Chongqing Normal University, Chongqing, 401331, China.

Fish typically prefer to live in big shoals due to the associated ecological benefits. Shoaling is a behavior that depends on the ability to quantitatively discriminate. The fundamental mechanism involved in quantity discrimination determines whether fish can discriminate a shoal using numerical discrete cues (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1214-yDOI Listing
November 2018
18 Reads

A gestural repertoire of 1- to 2-year-old human children: in search of the ape gestures.

Anim Cogn 2018 Sep 8. Epub 2018 Sep 8.

School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9JP, Scotland, UK.

When we compare human gestures to those of other apes, it looks at first like there is nothing much to compare at all. In adult humans, gestures are thought to be a window into the thought processes accompanying language, and sign languages are equal to spoken language with all of its features. Some research firmly emphasises the differences between human gestures and those of other apes; however, the question about whether there are any commonalities is rarely investigated, and has mostly been confined to pointing gestures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1213-zDOI Listing
September 2018

Variability in the "stereotyped" prey capture sequence of male cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) could relate to personality differences.

Anim Cogn 2018 Nov 3;21(6):773-785. Epub 2018 Sep 3.

Ichthyogenic Experimental Marine Centre (CISMAR), Department of Ecological and Biological Sciences, University of Tuscia, Tarquinia, Viterbo, Italy.

Studies of animal personality have shown consistent between-individual variation in behaviour in many social and non-social contexts, but hunting behaviour has been overlooked. Prey capture sequences, especially in invertebrates, are supposed to be quite invariant. In cuttlefish, the attack includes three components: attention, positioning, and seizure. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10071-018-1209-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1209-8DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

Human-directed behaviour in goats is not affected by short-term positive handling.

Anim Cogn 2018 Nov 1;21(6):795-803. Epub 2018 Sep 1.

Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology, Institute of Behavioural Physiology, Wilhelm-Stahl-Allee 2, 18196, Dummerstorf, Germany.

In addition to domestication, interactions with humans or task-specific training during ontogeny have been proposed to play a key role in explaining differences in human-animal communication across species. In livestock, even short-term positive interactions with caretakers or other reference persons can influence human-animal interaction at different levels and over different periods of time. In this study, we investigated human-directed behaviour in the 'unsolvable task' paradigm in two groups of domestic goats (Capra aegagrus hircus). Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10071-018-1211-1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-1211-1DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read