1,962 results match your criteria Animal Behaviour[Journal]


Which male and female characteristics influence the probability of extragroup paternities in rhesus macaques, ?

Anim Behav 2018 Jun 24;140:119-127. Epub 2018 May 24.

Junior Research Group of Primate Kin Selection, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany.

Extragroup paternity (EGP) is found across a wide range of species and may entail reproductive benefits, but may also entail costs to both sexes. While population and group parameters affecting the degree of EGPs are relatively well established, less is known about the individual characteristics that make males and females engage in alternative reproductive tactics such as EGP. Applying a combination of long-term demographic and genetic data from the rhesus macaque population of Cayo Santiago (Puerto Rico, U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.04.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6238966PMC

Intraspecific variation in cue-specific learning in sticklebacks.

Anim Behav 2018 Mar 19;137:161-168. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Program in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology, School of Integrative Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.

Animals must identify reliable cues amidst environmental noise during learning, and the cues that are most reliable often depend on the local ecology. Comparing the performance of populations of the same species across multiple versions of a cognitive task can reveal whether some populations learn to use certain cues faster than others. Here, using a criterion-based protocol, we assessed whether two natural populations of sticklebacks differed in how quickly they learned to associate two different discrimination cues with the location of food. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.01.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6239167PMC

Plasticity in extended phenotype increases offspring defence despite individual variation in web structure and behaviour.

Anim Behav 2018 Apr 20;138:9-17. Epub 2018 Mar 20.

Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan.

Many animals actively defend their offspring using a range of behaviours from calling and mobbing in birds, to physical grappling in crustaceans, and the expression of these behaviours positively scale with offspring value. While this role of behaviour in defence is well studied, very little is known about how other traits, specifically the structure of architectural constructions such as webs and nests, contribute to offspring defence. Additionally, although some tax a show consistent individual differences in offspring defence behaviour, it is completely unknown whether individuals also differ in defensive structures. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00033472183003
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.01.022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6197064PMC
April 2018
13 Reads

No task specialization among helpers in Damaraland mole-rats.

Anim Behav 2018 Sep;143:9-24

Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K.

The specialization of individuals in specific behavioural tasks is often attributed either to irreversible differences in development, which generate functionally divergent cooperative phenotypes, or to age-related changes in the relative frequency with which individuals perform different cooperative activities; both of which are common in many insect caste systems. However, contrasts in cooperative behaviour can take other forms and, to date, few studies of cooperative behaviour in vertebrates have explored the effects of age, adult phenotype and early development on individual differences in cooperative behaviour in sufficient detail to discriminate between these alternatives. Here, we used multinomial models to quantify the extent of behavioural specialization within nonreproductive Damaraland mole-rats, , at different ages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.07.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6147050PMC
September 2018

Individuals in larger groups are more successful on spatial discrimination tasks.

Anim Behav 2018 Aug;142:87-93

Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour, Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, U.K.

To understand how natural selection may act on cognitive processes, it is necessary to reliably determine interindividual variation in cognitive abilities. However, an individual's performance in a cognitive test may be influenced by the social environment. The social environment explains variation between species in cognitive performances, with species that live in larger groups purportedly demonstrating more advanced cognitive abilities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.05.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6107781PMC

In wolves, play behaviour reflects the partners' affiliative and dominance relationship.

Anim Behav 2018 Jul;141:137-150

Wolf Science Center, Domestication Lab, Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.

Puppy packs (consisting of only puppies) and mixed-age packs (composed of puppies and adults) were observed to test whether social play can be used for assessing and establishing social relations in wolves, . Differently from previous studies, we looked at play behaviours in detail, allowing us to categorize play interactions as either competitive or relaxed, and predicted that different types of play would be associated with different relationships between individuals. We found that the more time dyads spent in relaxed play, the more affiliative interactions they exchanged outside of play. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.04.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6058079PMC
July 2018
1 Read

Experimental manipulation of incubation period reveals no apparent costs of incubation in house wrens.

Anim Behav 2018 Mar 19;137:167-177. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Behavior, Ecology, Evolution and Systematics Section, School of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, IL, U.S.A.

Fitness costs of incubation ensue whenever the trade-off between incubation and foraging leads to suboptimal incubation or decreased parental body condition. We examined the costs of incubation in a wild population of house wrens, , by experimentally extending or decreasing the incubation period by cross-fostering eggs between nests at different stages of incubation (eggs from control nests were cross-fostered at the same stage of incubation). We determined whether parents or offspring bear the costs of incubation by measuring effects on females and offspring within the same breeding season during which the manipulation occurred, but also by evaluating potential trade-offs between current and future reproduction by monitoring return rates of experimental females and recruitment rates of offspring in subsequent breeding seasons. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.01.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6048971PMC

Social network dynamics precede a mass eviction in group-living rhesus macaques.

Anim Behav 2018 Feb 28;136:185-193. Epub 2017 Sep 28.

Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour, University of Exeter, Exeter, U.K.

Network dynamics can reveal information about the adaptive function of social behaviour and the extent to which social relationships can flexibly respond to extrinsic pressures. Changes in social networks occur following changes to the social and physical environment. By contrast, we have limited understanding of whether changes in social networks precede major group events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.08.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5990275PMC
February 2018
3 Reads

Does the handicap principle explain the evolution of dimorphic ornaments?

Anim Behav 2018 Apr;138:e7-e10

Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, Department of Integrative Biology and Evolution, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.

•We reinvestigate a new model based on the handicap hypothesis.•We show the handicap hypothesis does not explain male dimorphisms.•The results are due to the 'playing-the-field' assumption of the model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.01.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5910170PMC
April 2018
1 Read

The multidimensional behavioural hypervolumes of two interacting species predict their space use and survival.

Anim Behav 2017 Oct 5;132:129-136. Epub 2017 Sep 5.

Department of Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, U.S.A.

Individual animals differ consistently in their behaviour, thus impacting a wide variety of ecological outcomes. Recent advances in animal personality research have established the ecological importance of the multidimensional behavioural volume occupied by individuals and by multispecies communities. Here, we examine the degree to which the multidimensional behavioural volume of a group predicts the outcome of both intra- and interspecific interactions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.08.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5909842PMC
October 2017
3 Reads

Why come back home? Breeding-site fidelity varies with group size and parasite load in a colonial bird.

Anim Behav 2017 Oct 11;132:167-180. Epub 2017 Sep 11.

School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.

Fidelity to a past breeding site is widespread among animals and may confer both costs and benefits. Colonial species occur at specific sites that can accommodate multiple breeders, and the choice of whether to return to last year's site or disperse elsewhere can affect colony site use, the colony size distribution and individual fitness. For the colonial cliff swallow, , which occupies colonies of widely different sizes, we used a 30-year field study in western Nebraska to investigate how the extent of infestation by ectoparasites and colony size affected breeders' colony site fidelity between years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.08.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5898452PMC
October 2017

Chimpanzees gesture to humans in mirrors: using reflection to dissociate seeing from line of gaze.

Anim Behav 2018 Jan 26;135:239-249. Epub 2017 Dec 26.

Neuroscience Institute and Language Research Center, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, U.S.A.

There is much experimental evidence suggesting that chimpanzees understand that others see. However, previous research has never experimentally ruled out the alternative explanation that chimpanzees are just responding to the geometric cue of 'direct line of gaze', the observable correlate of seeing in others. Here, we sought to resolve this ambiguity by dissociating seeing from direct line of gaze using a mirror. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.11.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5877477PMC
January 2018

Social structure as a strategy to mitigate the costs of group living: a comparison of gelada and guereza monkeys.

Authors:
R I M Dunbar

Anim Behav 2018 Feb;136:53-64

Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K.

In mammals, and especially primates, group size and social complexity are typically correlated. However, we have no general explanation why this is so. I suggest that the answer may lie in one of the costs of group living: mammalian reproductive endocrinology is extremely sensitive to stress, and forms one of the hidden costs of living in groups. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00033472173040
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.12.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5825386PMC
February 2018
3 Reads

Parasite dispersal risk tolerance is mediated by its reproductive value.

Anim Behav 2017 Oct 14;132:247-252. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.

Parasite dispersal theory draws heavily upon epidemiological SIR models in which host status (susceptible (S), infected (I), or recovered (R)) is used to study parasite dispersal evolution. In contrast to these extrinsically host-centric drivers, in this study we focus on an intrinsic driver, the parasite's reproductive value (predicted future offspring) as a regulator of the extent to which the individual will engage in risky dispersal behaviour. As a model system we use the honeybee and its ectoparasite, the mite . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.08.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5772990PMC
October 2017
1 Read

Lack of conformity to new local dietary preferences in migrating captive chimpanzees.

Anim Behav 2017 Feb 16;124:135-144. Epub 2017 Jan 16.

Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology & Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, U.K.

Conformity to the behavioural preferences of others can have powerful effects on intragroup behavioural homogeneity in humans, but evidence in animals remains minimal. In this study, we took advantage of circumstances in which individuals or pairs of captive chimpanzees, , were 'migrated' between groups, to investigate whether immigrants would conform to a new dietary population preference experienced in the group they entered, an effect suggested by recent fieldwork. Such 'migratory-minority' chimpanzees were trained to avoid one of two differently coloured foods made unpalatable, before 'migrating' to, and then observing, a 'local-majority' group consume a different food colour. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.12.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5705092PMC
February 2017
3 Reads

Tolerant Barbary macaques maintain juvenile levels of social attention in old age, but despotic rhesus macaques do not.

Anim Behav 2017 Aug 22;130:199-207. Epub 2017 Jul 22.

Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.

Complex social life is thought to be a major driver of complex cognition in primates, but few studies have directly tested the relationship between a given primate species' social system and their social cognitive skills. We experimentally compared life span patterns of a foundational social cognitive skill (following another's gaze) in tolerant Barbary macaques, , and despotic rhesus macaques, . Semi-free-ranging monkeys ( = 80 individuals from each species) followed gaze more in test trials where an actor looked up compared to control trials. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.06.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5687259PMC
August 2017
1 Read

Interference in early dual-task learning by predatory mites.

Anim Behav 2017 Nov;133:21-28

Group of Arthropod Ecology and Behavior, Department of Crop Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Austria.

Animals are commonly exposed to multiple environmental stimuli, but whether, and under which circumstances, they can attend to multiple stimuli in multitask learning challenges is elusive. Here, we assessed whether simultaneously occurring chemosensory stimuli interfere with each other in a dual-task learning challenge. We exposed predatory mites early in life to either only conspecifics (kin) or simultaneously conspecifics (kin) and food (thrips or pollen), to determine whether presence of food interferes with social familiarization and, vice versa, whether presence of conspecifics interferes with learning the cues of thrips. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.09.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5663340PMC
November 2017
3 Reads

Using insights from animal behaviour and behavioural ecology to inform marine conservation initiatives.

Anim Behav 2016 10 29;120:211-221. Epub 2016 Apr 29.

School of Marine Science and Policy, University of Delaware, Lewes, DE, U.S.A.

The impacts of human activities on the natural world are becoming increasingly apparent, with rapid development and exploitation occurring at the expense of habitat quality and biodiversity. Declines are especially concerning in the oceans, which hold intrinsic value due to their biological uniqueness as well as their substantial sociological and economic importance. Here, we review the literature and investigate whether incorporation of knowledge from the fields of animal behaviour and behavioural ecology may improve the effectiveness of conservation initiatives in marine systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.03.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5665575PMC
October 2016
8 Reads
3.137 Impact Factor

alters aggressiveness as a function of social context and sex in the polyphenic beetle .

Anim Behav 2017 Oct 19;132:261-269. Epub 2017 Sep 19.

Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, U.S.A.

Despite sharing nearly the same genome, individuals within the same species can vary drastically in both morphology and behaviour as a function of developmental stage, sex or developmental plasticity. Thus, regulatory processes must exist that enable the stage-, sex- or environment-specific expression of traits and their integration during ontogeny, yet exactly how trait complexes are co-regulated and integrated is poorly understood. In this study, we explore the developmental genetic basis of the regulation and integration of environment-dependent sexual dimorphism in behaviour and morphology in the horn-polyphenic dung beetle through the experimental manipulation of the transcription factor The gene plays a profound role in the developmental regulation of morphological differences between sexes as well as alternative male morphs by inhibiting horn formation in females but enabling nutrition-responsive horn growth in males. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.08.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5618252PMC
October 2017
1 Read

Effects of early life adversity and sex on dominance in European starlings.

Anim Behav 2017 Jun;128:51-60

Centre for Behaviour and Evolution & Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK.

Dominance in socially foraging animals may be related to sex and to variation in individual quality. Individual quality may in turn reflect conditions during early development. We studied dominance in a cohort of adult European starlings, , that had been subject to experimental manipulations of food supply and begging effort when they were nestlings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.03.026DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5478363PMC
June 2017
9 Reads

Male great tits assort by personality during the breeding season.

Anim Behav 2017 Jun;128:21-32

University of Oxford, Department of Zoology, Edward Grey Institute, Oxford, U.K.

Animal personalities can influence social interactions among individuals, and thus have major implications for population processes and structure. Few studies have investigated the significance of the social context of animal personalities, and such research has largely focused on the social organization of nonterritorial populations. Here we address the question of whether exploratory behaviour, a well-studied personality trait, is related to the social structure of a wild great tit, , population during the breeding season. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00033472173011
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.04.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5478380PMC
June 2017
1 Read

A preference to bond? Male prairie voles form pair bonds even in the presence of multiple receptive females.

Anim Behav 2016 12 5;122:89-97. Epub 2016 Nov 5.

Department of Psychology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.

Pair bonds are the cornerstone of a monogamous relationship. When individuals of the same species engage in monogamy and promiscuity (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.10.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5450659PMC
December 2016

Early social isolation impairs development, mate choice and grouping behaviour of predatory mites.

Anim Behav 2017 May;127:15-21

Group of Arthropod Ecology and Behavior, Department of Crop Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria.

The social environment early in life is a key determinant of developmental, physiological and behavioural trajectories across vertebrate and invertebrate animals. One crucial variable is the presence/absence of conspecifics. For animals usually reared in groups, social isolation after birth or hatching can be a highly stressful circumstance, with potentially long-lasting consequences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.02.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5426552PMC
May 2017
3 Reads

The significance of spatial memory for water finding in a tadpole-transporting frog.

Anim Behav 2016 06;116:89-98

University of Vienna, Department of Integrative Zoology, Vienna, Austria.

The ability to associate environmental cues with valuable resources strongly increases the chances of finding them again, and thus memory often guides animal movement. For example, many temperate region amphibians show strong breeding site fidelity and will return to the same areas even after the ponds have been destroyed. In contrast, many tropical amphibians depend on exploitation of small, scattered and fluctuating resources such as ephemeral pools for reproduction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.02.023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5321284PMC
June 2016
5 Reads

Sex-specific offspring discrimination reflects respective risks and costs of misdirected care in a poison frog.

Anim Behav 2016 04;114:173-179

Messerli Research Institute, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, and University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

The ability to differentiate between one's own and foreign offspring ensures the exclusive allocation of costly parental care to only related progeny. The selective pressure to evolve offspring discrimination strategies is largely shaped by the likelihood and costs of offspring confusion. We hypothesize that males and females with different reproductive and spatial behaviours face different risks of confusing their own with others' offspring, and this should favour differential offspring discrimination strategies in the two sexes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.02.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5321237PMC
April 2016
4 Reads

Social calls provide novel insights into the evolution of vocal learning.

Anim Behav 2016 10 7;120:163-172. Epub 2016 Sep 7.

Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, U.S.A.

Learned song is among the best-studied models of animal communication. In oscine songbirds, where learned song is most prevalent, it is used primarily for intrasexual selection and mate attraction. Learning of a different class of vocal signals, known as contact calls, is found in a diverse array of species, where they are used to mediate social interactions among individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.07.031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5283696PMC
October 2016
1 Read

Primate reinfection with gastrointestinal parasites: behavioural and physiological predictors of parasite acquisition.

Anim Behav 2016 07 30;117:105-113. Epub 2016 May 30.

Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI, U.S.A; Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI, U.S.A; Global Health Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI, U.S.A.

Infectious disease transmission is a cost of sociality in humans and other animals. Nevertheless, the mechanisms linking social behaviour to infection risk are poorly known. We conducted a field experiment to examine how host intrinsic traits, behaviour and physiology affect infection of nonhuman primates with gastrointestinal parasites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.04.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5287709PMC
July 2016
3 Reads

Do we hear what birds hear in birdsong?

Anim Behav 2017 Feb 18;124:283-289. Epub 2016 Nov 18.

Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A.

Peter Marler's fascination with richness of birdsong included the notion that birds attended to some acoustic features of birdsong, likely in the time domain, which were inaccessible to human listeners. While a considerable amount is known about hearing and vocal communication in birds, how exactly birds perceive their auditory world still remains somewhat of a mystery. For sure, field and laboratory studies suggest that birds hear the spectral, gross temporal features (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.10.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5884127PMC
February 2017

Dazzle camouflage and the confusion effect: the influence of varying speed on target tracking.

Anim Behav 2017 Jan;123:349-353

Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, U.K.

The formation of groups is a common strategy to avoid predation in animals, and recent research has indicated that there may be interactions between some forms of defensive coloration, notably high-contrast 'dazzle camouflage', and one of the proposed benefits of grouping: the confusion effect. However, research into the benefits of dazzle camouflage has largely used targets moving with constant speed. This simplification may not generalize well to real animal systems, where a number of factors influence both within- and between-individual variation in speed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.11.022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5226095PMC
January 2017
3 Reads

A comparison between wolves, , and dogs, , in showing behaviour towards humans.

Anim Behav 2016 12;122:59-66

Messerli Research Institute, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Medical University of Vienna and University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Wolf Science Center, Ernstbrunn, Austria.

Both human and nonhuman primates use imperative pointing to request a desired object from another individual. Gaze alternation often accompanies such pointing gestures, and in species that have no hands this can in itself function as imperative pointing. Dogs have exceptional skills in communicating with humans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.09.023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5140004PMC
December 2016
4 Reads

Seasonal changes in neophobia and its consistency in rooks: the effect of novelty type and dominance position.

Anim Behav 2016 11;121:11-20

Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K.

Neophobia, or the fear of novelty, may offer benefits to animals by limiting their exposure to unknown danger, but can also impose costs by preventing the exploration of potential resources. The costs and benefits of neophobia may vary throughout the year if predation pressure, resource distribution or conspecific competition changes seasonally. Despite such variation, neophobia levels are often assumed to be temporally and individually stable. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.08.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5113992PMC
November 2016
1 Read

A novel statistical method for behaviour sequence analysis and its application to birdsong.

Anim Behav 2016 Jun 13;116:181-193. Epub 2016 May 13.

Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI, U.S.A.

Complex vocal signals, such as birdsong, contain acoustic elements that differ in both order and duration. These elements may convey socially relevant meaning, both independently and through their interactions, yet statistical methods that combine order and duration data to extract meaning have not, to our knowledge, been fully developed. Here we design novel semi-Markov methods, Bayesian estimation and classification trees to extract order and duration information from behavioural sequences and apply these methods to songs produced by male European starlings, , in two social contexts in which the function of song differs: a spring (breeding) and autumn (nonbreeding) context. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.04.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5033053PMC
June 2016
8 Reads

Street smart: faster approach towards litter in urban areas by highly neophobic corvids and less fearful birds.

Anim Behav 2016 Jul;117:123-133

Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter, Penryn Campus, Exeter, U.K.

The extent to which animals respond fearfully to novel stimuli may critically influence their ability to survive alongside humans. However, it is unclear whether the fear of novel objects, object neophobia, consistently varies in response to human disturbance. Where variation has been documented, it is unclear whether this variation is due to a change in fear towards specific novel stimuli, or whether it is symptomatic of a general change in fear behaviour. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.03.029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4938798PMC

Correlated evolution of personality, morphology and performance.

Anim Behav 2016 Jul 2;117:79-86. Epub 2016 Jun 2.

Department of Biological Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.

Evolutionary change in one trait can elicit evolutionary changes in other traits due to genetic correlations. This constrains the independent evolution of traits and can lead to unpredicted ecological and evolutionary outcomes. Animals might frequently exhibit genetic associations among behavioural and morphological-physiological traits, because the physiological mechanisms behind animal personality can have broad multitrait effects and because many selective agents influence the evolution of multiple types of traits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.04.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5791543PMC

Territorial raven pairs are sensitive to structural changes in simulated acoustic displays of conspecifics.

Anim Behav 2016 Jun;116:153-162

Department of Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Human language involves combining items into meaningful, syntactically structured wholes. The evolutionary origin of syntactic abilities has been investigated by testing pattern perception capacities in nonhuman animals. New World primates can respond spontaneously to structural changes in acoustic sequences and songbirds can learn to discriminate between various patterns in operant tasks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.04.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4907634PMC
June 2016
2 Reads

A problem with problem solving: motivational traits, but not cognition, predict success on novel operant foraging tasks.

Anim Behav 2016 Apr;114:189-198

Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour, Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, U.K.

Rates of innovative foraging behaviours and success on problem-solving tasks are often used to assay differences in cognition, both within and across species. Yet the cognitive features of some problem-solving tasks can be unclear. As such, explanations that attribute cognitive mechanisms to individual variation in problem-solving performance have revealed conflicting results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.02.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4833691PMC

Effects of sodium puddling on male mating success, courtship and flight in a swallowtail butterfly.

Anim Behav 2016 Apr;114:203-210

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.

In many Lepidoptera species usually only males puddle for sodium. Two explanations have been offered for this: (1) neuromuscular activity: males need increased sodium for flight because they are more active flyers than females; and (2) direct benefits: sodium is a type of direct benefit provided by males to females via ejaculate during mating. Surprisingly, there is little direct experimental evidence for either of these. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.01.028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4834894PMC
April 2016
1 Read

Inequity aversion strategies between marmosets are influenced by partner familiarity and sex but not oxytocin.

Anim Behav 2016 Apr;114:69-79

Callitrichid Research Center, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA; Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA; Department of Biology, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA.

Cooperation among individuals depends, in large part, on a sense of fairness. Many cooperating non-human primates (NHPs) show inequity aversion, (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.01.025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4802974PMC
April 2016
7 Reads

Cooperation in rats playing the iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game.

Anim Behav 2016 Apr;114:27-35

Department of Cell and Neurobiology, Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A.

Humans and animals show cooperative behaviour, but our understanding of cooperation among unrelated laboratory animals is limited. A classic test of cooperation is the iterated Prisoner's Dilemma (IPD) game, where two players receive varying payoffs for cooperation or defection in repeated trials. To determine whether unrelated rats cooperate in the IPD, we tested pairs of rats making operant responses to earn food reward in 25 trials/day. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.01.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4802975PMC
April 2016
15 Reads

Why does costly signalling evolve? Challenges with testing the handicap hypothesis.

Anim Behav 2015 Dec;110:e9-e12

Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, Department of Integrative Biology and Evolution, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.06.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4783833PMC
December 2015
1 Read

Do reproduction and parenting influence personality traits? Insights from threespine stickleback.

Anim Behav 2016 Feb;112:247-254

School of Integrative Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.

Although one of the hallmarks of personality traits is their consistency over time, we might expect personality traits to change during life history shifts. Becoming a parent is a major life history event, when individuals undergo dramatic behavioural and physiological changes. Here we employ a longitudinal experiment to ask whether personality changes in response to the experience of parenting in male threespine sticklebacks, . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.12.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4778261PMC
February 2016
1 Read

Measuring the robustness of network community structure using assortativity.

Anim Behav 2016 Feb;112:237-246

Edward Grey Institute of Field Ornithology, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, U.K.; Department of Anthropology, University of California Davis, CA, U.S.A.; Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama.

The existence of discrete social clusters, or 'communities', is a common feature of social networks in human and nonhuman animals. The level of such community structure in networks is typically measured using an index of modularity, . While modularity quantifies the degree to which individuals associate within versus between social communities and provides a useful measure of structure in the social network, it assumes that the network has been well sampled. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.12.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4758825PMC
February 2016

Recent social conditions affect boldness repeatability in individual sticklebacks.

Anim Behav 2016 Feb;112:139-145

Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K.

Animal personalities are ubiquitous across the animal kingdom and have been shown both to influence individual behaviour in the social context and to be affected by it. However, little attention has been paid to possible carryover effects of social conditions on personality expression, especially when individuals are alone. Here we investigated how the recent social context affected the boldness and repeatability of three-spined sticklebacks, , during individual assays. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.12.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4758823PMC
February 2016
2 Reads

Male bumblebees, , perform equally well as workers in a serial colour-learning task.

Anim Behav 2016 Jan;111:147-155

Department of Experimental and Biological Psychology, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, London, U.K.

The learning capacities of males and females may differ with sex-specific behavioural requirements. Bumblebees provide a useful model system to explore how different lifestyles are reflected in learning abilities, because their (female but sterile) workers and males engage in fundamentally different behaviour routines. Bumblebee males, like workers, embark on active flower foraging but in contrast to workers they have to trade off their feeding with mate search, potentially affecting their abilities to learn and utilize floral cues efficiently during foraging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.10.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4712640PMC
January 2016
1 Read

Interspecific interactions explain variation in the duration of paternal care in the burying beetle.

Anim Behav 2015 Nov;109:199-207

Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K.

Why is there so much variation within species in the extent to which males contribute to offspring care? Answers to this question commonly focus on intraspecific sources of variation in the relative costs and benefits of supplying paternal investment. With experiments in the laboratory on the burying beetle, , and its phoretic mite , we investigated whether interactions with a second species might also account for intraspecific variation in the extent of paternal care, and whether this variation is due to adaptation or constraint. In our first experiment we bred beetles in the presence or absence of phoretic mites, using a breeding box that mimicked natural conditions by allowing parents to leave the breeding attempt at a time of their choosing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.08.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4686539PMC
November 2015
2 Reads

Social status drives social relationships in groups of unrelated female rhesus macaques.

Anim Behav 2016 Jan;111:307-317

Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University, Durham, NC, U.S.A.; Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC, U.S.A.; Institute of Primate Research, National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya; Duke Population Research Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, U.S.A.

Strong social relationships confer health and fitness benefits in a number of species, motivating the need to understand the processes through which they arise. In female cercopithecine primates, both kinship and dominance rank are thought to influence rates of affiliative behaviour and social partner preference. Teasing apart the relative importance of these factors has been challenging, however, as female kin often occupy similar positions in the dominance hierarchy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.10.033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4707678PMC
January 2016
3 Reads

Behavioural differences: a link between biodiversity and pathogen transmission.

Anim Behav 2016 Jan;111:341-347

Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT, U.S.A.

Biodiversity often serves to reduce zoonotic pathogens, such that prevalence is lower in communities of greater diversity. This phenomenon is termed the dilution effect, and although it has been reported for several pathogens (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.11.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4700552PMC
January 2016

Exaggerated sexual swellings and male mate choice in primates: testing the reliable indicator hypothesis in the Amboseli baboons.

Anim Behav 2015 Jun;104:175-185

Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; National Museums of Kenya, Institute of Primate Research, Nairobi, Kenya.

The paradigm of competitive males vying to influence female mate choice has been repeatedly upheld, but, increasingly, studies also report competitive females and choosy males. One female trait that is commonly proposed to influence male mate choice is the exaggerated sexual swelling displayed by females of many Old World primate species. The reliable indicator hypothesis posits that females use the exaggerated swellings to compete for access to mates, and that the swellings advertise variation in female fitness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.03.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4704114PMC
June 2015
21 Reads

Parental effects and flight behaviour in the burying beetle, .

Anim Behav 2015 Oct;108:91-100

Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, U.K.

Parents play a key role in determining the phenotype of their offspring. However, relatively few studies have investigated whether parents can change their offspring's behaviour in a sustained way that persists into adulthood. With experiments on the burying beetle, , we investigated how the developmental environment created by parents affects their offspring's wing morphology in adulthood, and the correlated effects on adult flight behaviour. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.07.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4678603PMC
October 2015