1,863 results match your criteria Anesthesia Progress [Journal]


Anesthetic Management of a Pediatric Patient With Cardiofaciocutaneous Syndrome.

Anesth Prog 2020 ;67(1):45-47

Department of Dental Anesthesia, The Nippon Dental University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is a rare condition characterized by congenital heart disease, craniofacial dysmorphology, and dermatological abnormalities. CFC syndrome is one of the RASopathies, a family of syndromes that also includes Noonan and Costello syndromes, all with underlying gene mutations involving the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Important considerations for anesthesiologists caring for these patients include the need to evaluate for possible cardiac defects, anticipating and planning for potentially difficult airway management, and the consideration of potential weakness of the respiratory muscles. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-67-01-07DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083123PMC
January 2020

Use of the Microcuff During General Anesthesia for Patients With Scoliosis.

Anesth Prog 2020 ;67(1):23-27

Professor and Chairman, Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Division of Oral Pathogenesis and Disease Control, Asahi University School of Dentistry, Gifu, Japan.

Scoliosis may often be associated with a variety of cardiovascular and respiratory conditions or diseases, and depending on the severity of the spinal deformity, it may also complicate anesthetic management because of the difficulty of neck extension and tracheal deformity. Therefore, patients with scoliosis may require careful perioperative anesthetic considerations. A 14-year-old girl was scheduled to undergo extractions and restorative treatment for dental caries under general anesthesia. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-03-01DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083121PMC
January 2020

Anesthetic Management of a Patient With a Vagal Nerve Stimulator.

Anesth Prog 2020 ;67(1):16-22

Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Field of Oral and Maxillofacial Rehabilitation, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima, Japan.

Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) is an established adjunctive treatment for patients with refractory epilepsy. VNS is effective in many cases, but few patients achieve complete elimination of seizures. Furthermore, VNS can cause respiratory complications, such as obstructive sleep apnea. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-03-02DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083113PMC
January 2020

Endotracheal Tube Migration Associated With Extension During Tracheotomy.

Anesth Prog 2020 ;67(1):3-8

Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.

Tracheotomy is occasionally performed to prevent postoperative airway obstruction especially for invasive surgical procedures involving head and neck cancer. When performed under general anesthesia, attention must be paid to avoid rupture of the tracheal tube cuff during the incision into the trachea. In this study, changes in the position of the endotracheal tube tip during extension of the head and neck for a tracheotomy were investigated. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-04-05DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083118PMC
January 2020

Alternative Transoral Application of Nasopharyngeal Airways.

Anesth Prog 2020 ;67(1):39-44

Dental Anesthesiology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Transoral application of a nasopharyngeal airway (NPA) is a novel technique for difficult airway management. Clinically, it is an effective alternative for use in nonintubated dental cases under total intravenous anesthesia. This technique can help improve oxygenation and ventilation in clinical situations in which the conventional use of NPAs is ineffective, such as in patients who have findings of obesity; mandibular retrognathia or hypoplasia; maxillary hypoplasia; macroglossia; nasal obstruction secondary to hypertrophic tonsillar, adenoid, and/or lymphoid tissues or nasal polyps; known unusual nasal anatomy (eg, septal deviation); high risk of prolonged epistaxis (eg, patients on anticoagulants); or those who demonstrate mouth-breathing behaviors during deep sedation/nonintubated general anesthesia. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-03-04DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083124PMC
January 2020

Comparing the Efficacy of a Compound Topical Anesthetic Versus Benzocaine: A Pilot Study.

Anesth Prog 2020 ;67(1):9-15

Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.

To compare the effectiveness of a combination of 10% lidocaine, 10% prilocaine, and 4% tetracaine versus 20% benzocaine for use as a topical anesthetic agent prior to dental injections. A double-blind randomized prospective clinical trial was conducted with 26 participants receiving a topical anesthetic of 20% benzocaine (control) and 26 participants receiving a compound topical anesthetic mixture of 10% lidocaine, 10% prilocaine, and 4% tetracaine (experimental) prior to a maxillary infiltration injection. The procedure was conducted by 1 operator with the Wand injection system. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-03-05DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083119PMC
January 2020

Perfect Time for a Fresh Perspective.

Authors:
Kyle J Kramer

Anesth Prog 2020 ;67(1):1-2

Editor-in-Chief, Anesthesia Progress.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-67-01-09DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083114PMC
January 2020

Anesthetic Management of a Patient With Systemic Sclerosis and Microstomia.

Anesth Prog 2020 ;67(1):28-34

Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry, Tokyo, Japan.

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease that can cause fibrosis in vital organs, often resulting in damage to the skin, blood vessels, gastrointestinal system, lungs, heart, and/or kidneys. Patients with SSc are also likely to develop microstomia, which can render dental treatment difficult and painful, thereby necessitating advanced anesthetic management. This is a case report of a 61-year-old woman with a history of SSc with microstomia, interstitial pneumonia, and gastroesophageal reflux disease in whom intravenous moderate sedation was performed using a combination of dexmedetomidine and ketamine for dental extractions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-03-07DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083117PMC
January 2020

An Avulsed Tooth Detected Prior to Insertion of a Laryngeal Mask Airway.

Anesth Prog 2020 ;67(1):35-38

Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Suita, Japan.

This case report describes the importance of inspecting the hypopharynx via direct laryngoscopy prior to laryngeal mask airway (LMA) insertion during induction of general anesthesia for dental patients with special needs. A 51-year-old man with cerebral palsy underwent induction of general anesthesia for dental extractions and subsequently was noted to be missing a tooth. Prompt inspection of the airway via direct laryngoscopy revealed the tooth resting within the pharynx, which was subsequently retrieved, prior to insertion of the LMA. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-04-01DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083122PMC
January 2020

Literature Review for Office-Based Anesthesia.

Authors:
Mark A Saxen

Anesth Prog 2020 ;67(1):60-62

Indiana Office-Based Anesthesia Indiana University School of Dentistry Indianapolis, IN.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/0003-3006-67.1.60DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083120PMC
January 2020

Medication Safety: Reducing Anesthesia Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events in Dentistry Part 2.

Anesth Prog 2020 ;67(1):48-59

Private Practice, Special Care Dentistry of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

For decades, the dental profession has provided the full spectrum of anesthesia services ranging from local anesthesia to general anesthesia in the office-based ambulatory environment to alleviate pain and anxiety. However, despite a reported record of safety, complications occasionally occur. Two common contributing factors to general anesthesia and sedation complications are medication errors and adverse drug events. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-67-01-10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083115PMC
January 2020

Monheim LM. Analgesia in dentistry now and in the future. . 1971;18(5):100-106 and . 1971:9:1(abstract).

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(4):232-234

Professor Emeritus, Anesthesiology University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Cincinnati, Ohio.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-04-09DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6938165PMC

Comparison of Patient Comfort During the First Stage of Conventional Versus Modified Two-Stage Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks in Pediatric Patients.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(4):221-226

Department of Paedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, India.

Our aim was to compare the comfort of pediatric patients during the first stage of the conventional 2-stage inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) versus the modified 2-stage IANB. This was a parallel group, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Pediatric patients meeting the inclusion criteria were randomly allocated to 1 of the 2 groups receiving IANB, group 1 (31 subjects) utilized a conventional 2-stage technique, and group 2 (33 subjects) utilized a modified 2-stage approach. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-03-03DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6938170PMC

Impact of Instituting General Anesthesia on Oral Sedation Care in a Tertiary Care Pediatric Dental Clinic.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(4):183-191

Department of Dentistry, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Tertiary pediatric medical centers disproportionately care for low-income, underserved children with significant dental needs. Long wait times for hospital operating room treatment increase tooth loss rather than restoration. Oral sedation has commonly been provided to avoid the long waits for operating room treatment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-02-02DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6938172PMC

Malignant Hyperthermia: A Case Study in the Dental Ambulatory Surgery Setting.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(4):202-210

Associate Professor and Program Director of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, Columbus, Ohio.

Historically, patients who developed malignant hyperthermia had an extremely high rate of mortality. Today, if treated appropriately, patients who experience an episode of malignant hyperthermia will most likely survive. This dramatic decrease in mortality associated with malignant hyperthermia is due to several factors, including an increased understanding of the disease, improved diagnostic and monitoring equipment, and the development of lifesaving pharmacologic agents. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-04-03DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6938168PMC

An Evaluation of Ibuprofen Versus Ibuprofen/Acetaminophen for Postoperative Endodontic Pain in Patients With Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis and Symptomatic Apical Periodontitis.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(4):192-201

Emeritus Associate Professor, Division of Biosciences, The Ohio State University.

The purpose of this investigation was to compare ibuprofen versus an ibuprofen/acetaminophen combination for postoperative pain control in a patient model specific to teeth diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis and symptomatic apical periodontitis. One hundred and two patients presenting with moderate to severe pain from a maxillary or mandibular posterior tooth diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis and symptomatic apical periodontitis were included. Following local anesthetic administration, complete endodontic cleaning and shaping was performed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-03-06DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6938166PMC

A Review of Current Literature of Interest to the Office-Based Anesthesiologist.

Authors:
Mark A Saxen

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(4):235-237

Indiana Office-Based Anesthesia Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, Indiana.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/0003-3006-66.4.235DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6938167PMC
January 2019

Anesthetic Management of a Patient With Fanconi Anemia.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(4):218-220

Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.

Fanconi anemia (FA) is a type of bone marrow failure syndrome based on an autosomal recessive inherited trait with increased predisposition for other cancers. It is extremely rare and is characterized by short stature, polydactyly, and pancytopenia. At present, the only effective treatment for FA is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-02-06DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6938164PMC

Announcing a New Annual Feature for the Journal.

Authors:
Kyle J Kramer

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(4):181-182

Editor-in-Chief, Anesthesia Progress.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-04-10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6938171PMC

Acute Management of Massive Epistaxis After Nasotracheal Extubation.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(4):211-217

Department of Dental Anesthesiology and Pain Management, Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Japan.

Epistaxis is one of the most common complications of nasotracheal intubation and can be life-threatening. However, there is little discussion in the current literature on the acute management of massive epistaxis after nasotracheal extubation. This is a report of 2 patients who experienced severe unanticipated nasal bleeding immediately after extubation, 1 after a surgical procedure for oral cancer and another after restorative dental treatment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-02-09DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6938169PMC

Analgesia in Dentistry Now and in the Future.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(4):227-231

Professor and Chairman, Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh, School of Dental Medicine, Professor of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/0003-3006-66.4.227DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6938173PMC

Medication Safety: Reducing Anesthesia Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events in Dentistry Part 1.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(3):162-172

Private Practice, Special Care Dentistry of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

For decades, the dental profession has provided anesthesia services in office-based, ambulatory settings to alleviate pain and anxiety, ranging from local anesthesia to general anesthesia. However, despite a reported record of safety, complications occasionally occur. Two common contributing factors to general anesthesia and sedation complications are medication errors and adverse drug events. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-03-10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6759645PMC
February 2020
11 Reads

Efficacy of Topical Anesthetics in Pain Perception During Mini-implant Insertion: Systematic Review of Controlled Clinical Trials.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(3):119-132

Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, Federal University of Campina Grande, Patos, Paraíba, Brazil.

The focus of this systematic review is to assess the efficacy of several commonly utilized anesthetic techniques for reducing pain during the placement of mini-implants. An electronic search was conducted in the databases PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Medline Complete, Cochrane, Trials Central, and Clinical Trials, without limitations on year of publication or language. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) were considered. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-01-11DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6759642PMC
February 2020
1 Read

Anesthetic Management of Patient With Dravet Syndrome: A Case Report.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(3):156-158

Department of Anesthesiology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka, Japan.

Dravet syndrome (DS) is a rare and severe form of epilepsy that begins in infancy. This is particularly burdensome because repeated epileptic seizures lead to cognitive decline. We describe the case of a 12-year-old girl who was diagnosed with DS and was scheduled to have gingival reduction around her mandibular molars. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-02-03DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6759646PMC
February 2020
3 Reads

Cardiovascular Comparison of 2 Types of Local Anesthesia With Vasoconstrictor in Older Adults: A Crossover Study.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(3):133-140

Department of Gerodontology and Oral Rehabilitation, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.

We assessed the effect of 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 adrenaline (L + AD) and 3% prilocaine with 0.03 IU/mL felypressin (P + FP) on blood pressure and heart rate in older adults with systemic diseases undergoing dental extraction. This double-blind, randomized crossover study included 22 elderly participants, aged over 65 years. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-02-04DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6759644PMC
February 2020
1 Read

Perioperative Management of a Patient With Cornelia de Lange Syndrome and Tetralogy of Fallot.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(3):159-161

Department of Dentistry for Children with Special Needs, Gunma Children's Medical Center, Shibukawa, Japan.

This is a case report of a 21-year-old male patient with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdL) and unrepaired tetralogy of Fallot scheduled for dental treatment under general anesthesia. Anticipated dental care consisted of restorative treatment and extractions. Surgical correction of the patient's congenital cardiac abnormalities had not occurred by the time of dental treatment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-04-02DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6759639PMC
February 2020
4 Reads

Mortality and Morbidity in Office-Based General Anesthesia for Dentistry in Ontario.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(3):141-150

Professor and Dean, Dental Anesthesia, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Our objective was to estimate the prevalence of mortality and serious morbidity for office-based deep sedation and general anesthesia (DS/GA) for dentistry in Ontario from 1996 to 2015. Data were collected retrospectively in 2 phases. Phase I involved the review of incidents, and phase II involved a survey of DS/GA providers. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-02-07DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6759641PMC
February 2020

Two Cases of Rocuronium-Induced Anaphylaxis/Anaphylactic Shock Successfully Treated With Sugammadex.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(3):151-155

Department of Anesthesiology, Aichi Gakuin University School of Dentistry, Nagoya, Japan.

While anaphylaxis can occur at any time during general anesthesia, 90% of cases occur at induction of anesthesia. As several drugs are administered simultaneously at this time, it is difficult to identify the causative agent. However, it has been found that rocuronium is the most common drug associated with perioperative anaphylaxis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-01-07DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6759648PMC
February 2020
1 Read

The ADSA Ten Minutes Saves a Life! App.

Authors:
Kyle J Kramer

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(3):117-118

Editor-in-Chief, Anesthesia Progress.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-03-08DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6759640PMC
February 2020

A Review of Current Literature of Interest to the Office-Based Anesthesiologist.

Authors:
Mark A Saxen

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(3):173-176

Indiana Office-Based Anesthesia Indiana University School of Dentistry Indianapolis, IN.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-03-09DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6759647PMC
January 2019

Immunohistochemical Analysis of Nerve Distribution in Mandible of Rats.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(2):87-93

Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Ohu University School of Dentistry, Fukushima, Japan.

After review of the literature, there appears to be no report on the histology of the mandibular nerve fiber distribution. Therefore, using a Wistar rat model, immunohistochemical staining with protein gene product (PGP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antibody for all nerves and only the pain-sensitive nerves, respectively, was performed. We also statistically compared the nerve distribution density by mandibular region. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-01-10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560694PMC
January 2020
8 Reads

A Review of Scientific Literature of Interest to Office-Based Anesthesiology Practitioners.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(2):111-114

Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-02-11DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560688PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

The History of the Specialty of Dental Anesthesiology.

Authors:
Joel M Weaver

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(2):61-68

Dentist Anesthesiologist Specialist, Diplomate of the American Dental Board of Anesthesiology, and Professor Emeritus, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-02-12DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560690PMC
January 2020
5 Reads

Ludwig's Angina: Anesthetic Management.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(2):103-110

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Ohio State University, College of Dentistry, Columbus, Ohio.

Ludwig's angina (LA) is a gangrenous cellulitis of the neck that spreads via continuity of the fascial planes. Treatment of LA includes aggressive antibiotic therapy as well as surgical drainage in many cases. The most common cause of infection is odontogenic and can be due to both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-01-13DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560692PMC
January 2020
7 Reads

General Anesthesia in a Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Child: A Case Report.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(2):94-96

Department of Dental Anesthesia, Nippon Dental University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

We performed general anesthesia on a 3-year-old boy with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Patients with G6PD deficiency exhibit jaundice and anemia due to hemolysis caused by a lack of the G6PD enzyme. To maintain anesthesia, we used propofol and remifentanil, which may prevent hemolytic attacks by exerting an antioxidant effect. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-01-05DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560686PMC
January 2020
22 Reads

Analysis of Dose Escalation of Propofol Associated With Frequent Sedation.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(2):97-102

Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Ohu University, School of Dentistry, Fukushima, Japan.

Patients with dental phobia frequently require intravenous sedation to complete dental treatment. We encountered a case of a patient who received frequent sedation by propofol, which required escalation in the dosage of propofol required. The patient was a healthy young female with severe dental phobia, and the dental procedures were initiated under intravenous sedation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-02-08DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560689PMC
January 2020
9 Reads

Comparison of Pain Perception Using Conventional Versus Computer-Controlled Intraligamentary Local Anesthetic Injection for Extraction of Primary Molars.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(2):69-76

Professor, Department of Oral Surgery, ESIC Dental College, Rohini, Delhi, India.

This study was conducted to compare pain perception of intraligamentary anesthesia (ILA) using a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system (CCLADS) versus a conventional intraligamentary injection for extraction of primary molars. A randomized controlled trial was designed where 82 children requiring 102 primary molar extractions were given ILA of 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine with either the conventional method or a CCLADS. Pain during injection and extraction was assessed using the Sound, Eye, Motor (SEM) scale and heart rate recording. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-01-09DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560687PMC
January 2020
6 Reads

Illinois Dental Anesthesia and Sedation Survey for 2016.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(2):77-86

Resident, Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, UIC, Chicago, Illinois.

A statewide decennial survey was sent to practicing dentists holding sedation or general anesthesia permits to identify office sedation/general anesthesia trends and practices over the last 10 years. This survey constitutes the third such survey, spanning a total of 20 years. Of the 234 respondents in the 2016 survey, 34% held an Illinois moderate sedation permit and 64% held a general anesthesia permit. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-01-08DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560693PMC
January 2020
7 Reads

A Formula for Estimating the Appropriate Tube Depth for Intubation.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(1):8-13

Department of Perioperative Medicine, Division of Anesthesiology, Showa University School of Dentistry, Tokyo, Japan.

An estimation of the appropriate tubing depth for fixation is helpful to prevent inadvertent endobronchial intubation and prolapse of cuff from the vocal cord. A feasible estimation formula should be established. We measured the anatomical length of the upper-airway tract through the oral and nasal pathways on cephalometric radiographs and tried to establish the estimation formula from the height of the patient. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-65-04-04DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6424171PMC
January 2020
2 Reads

Panoramic Radiographic Relationship of the Mandibular Foramen to the Anterior Border of the Ramus and Occlusal Plane as an Aid in Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(1):20-23

Dentistry student, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran.

The location of the mandibular foramen (MF) on digital panoramic radiographs can be an important guide for clinicians when administering the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for dental anesthesia of the mandible. This study, aimed to assess the location of the MF relative to the anterior border (AB) of the ramus and the occlusal plane (OP) from digital panoramic radiographs. An observational case series study was conducted on digital panoramic radiographs from the oral and maxillofacial radiology department archives of patients at least 18 years of age with a 1:1 scale (100%). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-65-04-05DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6424164PMC
January 2020
12 Reads

Anesthetic Efficacy of Buccal Infiltration Articaine versus Lidocaine for Extraction of Primary Molar Teeth.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(1):3-7

Department of Public Health Dentistry, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India.

The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of articaine versus lidocaine, both containing epinephrine, using a single buccal infiltration for extraction of primary molars.A total of 100 children requiring primary molar extraction received buccal infiltration using either 4% articaine or 2% lidocaine, both with epinephrine, with 50 children in each group. The Wong-Baker Facial Pain Scale (FPS) was used to evaluate pain perception subjectively. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-65-04-02DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6424172PMC
January 2020
4 Reads

Pulpal Anesthesia of Adjacent Teeth Following Infiltration of 2% Lidocaine With 1:100,000 Epinephrine in the Maxillary Lateral Incisor and First Molar.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(1):14-19

Emeritus Associate Professor, Division of Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

The purpose of this study was to determine anesthetic success in adjacent teeth following a primary infiltration of the maxillary lateral incisor and first molar using 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Three hundred eight asymptomatic subjects received an infiltration of a cartridge of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine over the maxillary lateral incisor (163 subjects) or first molar (145 subjects). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-65-04-03DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6424161PMC
January 2020
3 Reads

Anesthetic Management of a Patient With Hereditary Angioedema for Oral Surgery.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(1):30-32

Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease that results from deficiency or dysfunction of C1 inhibitor (C1-INH). This disease is characterized by sudden attacks of angioedema. When edema occurs in the pharynx or larynx, it can lead to serious airway compromise, including death. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.anesthesiaprogress.org/doi/10.2344/anpr-65-04-01
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-65-04-01DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6424165PMC
January 2020
29 Reads

Efficacy of Topical Benzocaine in Maxilla: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(1):24-29

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon, Lahore, Pakistan.

This study aims to compare the effect of topical anesthesia against the use of no topical agent on pain of needle penetration and local anesthesia deposition during buccal infiltration in anterior maxilla. In a randomized controlled trial, 100 adult participants were randomly allocated to the benzocaine group (received 20% benzocaine gel) and no benzocaine group (received no topical agent) prior to buccal infiltration in maxillary anterior teeth. A 27-gauge needle was used to deposit 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.anesthesiaprogress.org/doi/10.2344/anpr-66-01-01
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-01-01DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6424162PMC
January 2020
2 Reads

Endotracheal Intubation Complicated by a Palatal Tooth in a Patient With Treacher Collins Syndrome.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(1):42-43

Division of Dental Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Medicine and Dental Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata, Japan.

We report a case of difficult endotracheal intubation in a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome. A sixteen-year-old female patient scheduled for general anesthesia had a displaced palatal tooth that interfered with laryngoscope insertion into the pharyngeal space. To address this problem, we successfully performed endotracheal intubation using a fiberscope while elevating the epiglottic vallecula using a King Vision™ video laryngoscope. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-02-01DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6424163PMC
January 2020
12 Reads

Large Shoes to Fill.

Authors:
Kyle J Kramer

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(1):1-2

Editor-in-Chief, Anesthesia Progress.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-01-12DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6424167PMC
January 2020
1 Read

A Review of Current Literature of Interest to the Office-Based Anesthesiologist.

Authors:
Mark A Saxen

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(1):52-54

Indiana Office-Based Anesthesia, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, IN.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-01-14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6424166PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Office-Based Sedation/General Anesthesia for COPD Patients, Part II.

Anesth Prog 2019 ;66(1):44-51

Private Practice, CarePoint Anesthesia, Denver, Colorado.

The safe treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in dental office office-based settings can be quite complex without a current understanding of the etiology, course, severity, and current treatment modalities of the disease. The additional concerns of providing sedation and/or general anesthesia to patients with COPD in settings outside of a hospital demand thorough investigation of individual patient presentation and realistic development of planned treatment that patients suffering from this respiratory condition can tolerate. Along with other co-morbidities, such as advanced age and potential significant cardiovascular compromise, the dental practitioner providing sedation or general anesthesia must tailor any treatment plan to address multiple organ systems and mitigate risks of precipitating acute respiratory failure from inadequate pain and/or anxiety control. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.anesthesiaprogress.org/doi/10.2344/anpr-66-02-05
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-66-02-05DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6424168PMC
January 2020
26 Reads