28,925 results match your criteria Anaphylaxis


Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions in the Americas: Similarities and Differences.

Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2019.02.007DOI Listing
February 2019

Adverse Reactions to Fluorescein Angiography: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature.

Surv Ophthalmol 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, 700 University Blvd. alveston, TX 77555. Electronic address:

We reviewed literature on adverse reactions to intravenous fluorescein angiography (IVFA) using PubMed and found 78 articles in English from 1961-2017. The reported rates of adverse reactions were overall 0.083-21. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.survophthal.2019.02.004DOI Listing
February 2019

Trends in hospitalizations related to anaphylaxis, angioedema and urticaria in the United States.

Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2019 Feb 12. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2019.02.003DOI Listing
February 2019

Anaphylaxis to Carboxymethylcellulose: Add Food Additives to the List of Elicitors.

Pediatrics 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Pediatrics, Nagasaki University Hospital, Nagasaki, Japan.

A 14-year-old girl developed 4 episodes of anaphylaxis of unknown etiology, which required intramuscular adrenaline administration each time. She had eaten pizza and a cheeseburger immediately before the first 2 episodes, respectively, but had not eaten anything for several hours before the last 2 episodes. It turned out that she had eaten the same ice lolly 4 hours before the first 3 episodes and a Café au lait Swirkle (a half-frozen beverage) 4 hours before the last episode. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/lookup/doi/10.1542/ped
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2018-1180DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Duration of Observation for Detecting a Biphasic Reaction in Anaphylaxis: A Meta-Analysis.

Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2019 Feb 14:1-6. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Republic of

Background: We conducted a meta-analysis to determine a practical observation time for detecting a biphasic reaction after resolution of the initial anaphylactic reaction.

Methods: A systematic literature search identified studies on adult patients with anaphylaxis and a subsequent biphasic reaction due to various causes that contained sufficient data to extract outcomes. The outcomes were pooled using a random-effects model. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000496092DOI Listing
February 2019

[Management of childhood food allergies].

Rev Med Suisse 2019 Feb;15(638):398-401

Unité d'allergologie pédiatrique, HUG, 1211 Genève 14.

Food allergy reduces the quality of allergic children life because of a lethal risk. Current recommendations are favouring introduction of potentially allergenic foods according to usual, non-delayed, practices. In allergic children, intramuscular epinephrine is the key treatment of anaphylaxis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2019

Immediate hypersensitivity reaction to human serum albumin in a child undergoing plasmapheresis.

Transfusion 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Division of Allergy and Immunology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Background: Human serum albumin (HSA) is a commonly used colloid for volume expansion and albumin replacement and during plasmapheresis. Colloids are an uncommon cause of anaphylaxis, and cases of hypersensitivity reactions to HSA are extremely rare.

Case Report: A 10-year-old boy with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy was treated with plasmapheresis, with albumin as the replacement fluid. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/trf.15194DOI Listing
February 2019

Epinephrine Administered for Anaphylaxis Unmasking a Type 1 Brugada Pattern on Electrocardiogram.

J Emerg Med 2019 Feb 9. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Background: Brugada pattern on electrocardiography (ECG) can manifest as type 1 (coved pattern) and type 2 (saddleback pattern). Brugada syndrome represents an ECG with Brugada pattern in a patient with symptoms or clinical factors, including syncope, cardiac arrest, ventricular dysrhythmias, and family history. Brugada syndrome is caused by a genetic channelopathy, but the Brugada pattern may be drug-induced. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2018.12.045DOI Listing
February 2019

Metreleptin treatment for congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4 (CGL4): a case report.

Clin Pediatr Endocrinol 2019 31;28(1):1-7. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Pediatrics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.

Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4 (CGL4) is a rare disease caused by mutations in the gene polymerase I and transcript release factor (), the main symptoms of which are systemic reductions in adipose tissue and muscular dystrophy. The strategy of treating CGL4 is to improve the insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia that result from systemic reductions in adipose tissue. Metreleptin, a synthetic analog of human leptin, is effective against generalized lipodystrophies; however, there are no reports of the use of metreleptin in the treatment of CGL4. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1297/cpe.28.1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6356095PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Predicting outgrowth of IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy: Diagnostic tests in children under two years of age.

Allergol Immunopathol (Madr) 2019 Feb 8. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Kocaeli University Faculty of Medicine, Turkey. Electronic address:

Background: Limited studies conducted on children <2 years old and/or involving a skin prick test (SPT) for fresh milk (FM) have examined the predictive value of allergometric tests for outgrowth of cow's milk allergy (CMA). We investigated the optimal decision points for outgrowth (ODP) with SPT for commercial cow's milk extract (CE) and FM and specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) levels for milk proteins to predict outgrowing allergy in children <2 years old.

Methods: SPTs for CE and FM, tests for sIgEs (cow's milk, casein, α-lactoalbumin, β-lactoglobulin) and oral food challenges (OFC) were performed in children referred for evaluation of suspected CMA, and 15 months after diagnosis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aller.2018.12.007DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Human and disease models to study food allergy.

Asia Pac Allergy 2019 Jan 15;9(1):e4. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Department of Immunology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Food allergy is a growing global public health concern. As treatment strategies are currently limited to allergen avoidance and emergency interventions, there is an increasing demand for appropriate models of food allergy for the development of new therapeutics. Many models of food allergy rely heavily on the use of animals, and while useful, many are unable to accurately reflect the human system. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5415/apallergy.2019.9.e4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6365658PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Allergy to carminic acid: evidence of involvement of protein-binding hapten.

Asia Pac Allergy 2019 Jan 14;9(1):e2. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Division of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Department of Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

We previously described a rare case of anaphylaxis presumably induced by carminic acid in cochineal dye used as a food additive. In this study, highly pure carminic acid was added to an albumin-containing buffer at various concentrations, followed by serial dilution. Varying the mixing ratio of carminic acid and albumin affected the extent of histamine release from passively sensitized basophils. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5415/apallergy.2019.9.e2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6365656PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Efficacy and safety of oral immunotherapy for peanut allergy: a pilot study in Singaporean children.

Asia Pac Allergy 2019 Jan 29;9(1):e1. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119077.

Background: Peanut allergy is an increasing problem in Singapore and strict avoidance is difficult as peanut is ubiquitous in Asian cuisine.

Objective: We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) in children with obvious peanut allergy in Singapore.

Methods: This was an open-label study of peanut OIT in children living in Singapore, with 2 weekly dose escalation until final maintenance dose of 3,000 mg of peanut protein and a maintenance phase of 12 months. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5415/apallergy.2019.9.e1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6365660PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Histamine-driven responses are sustained via a bioactive metabolite.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Allergy and Immunology Division.

A histamine metabolite, imidazole acetic acid (IAA), recapitulates key histamine-driven biology, including recruitment of eosinophils, induction of itch, and induction of anaphylaxis. IAA may perpetuate anaphylactic and other allergic responses after the initial release and metabolism of histamine. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2019.01.037DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Anaphylactoid Syndrome of Pregnancy.

Nurs Womens Health 2019 Feb;23(1):38-48

Anaphylactoid syndrome of pregnancy (ASP) is a widespread, proinflammatory, anaphylactic-like reaction that can occur when amniotic fluid enters the maternal blood circulation. ASP is characterized by four cardinal findings: respiratory distress, altered mental status, hypotension, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. ASP is commonly associated with maternal and neonatal mortality. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S17514851183023
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nwh.2018.11.006DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Morphological and functional analysis of beige (Chèdiak-Higashi syndrome) mouse mast cells with giant granules.

Int Immunopharmacol 2019 Feb 6;69:202-212. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Department of Pharmacology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine Shitsukawa, Toon, Ehime 791-0295, Japan.

Chèdiak-Higashi syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease that causes hypopigmentation, recurrent infections, mild coagulation defects and neurological problems. Beige mice carry a mutation in the lysosome trafficking regulator (LYST) gene and display some of the key characteristics of human Chèdiak-Higashi syndrome, in particular, a high susceptibility to infection due to aberrant natural killer (NK) cell and polymorphonuclear leucocyte function. Morphological analysis of beige mice reveals the presence of enlarged lysosomes in a variety of cell types, including leucocytes, hepatocytes, fibroblasts and renal tubule cells. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2019.01.053DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Traditional Tibetan medicine Anzhijinhua San attenuates Ovalbumin-induced diarrhea by regulating serotonin signaling system in mice.

J Ethnopharmacol 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Qinghai Key Laboratory of Tibetan Medicine Pharmacology and Safety Evaluation, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008, China; Key Laboratory of Tibetan Medicine Research, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008, China; State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211198, China; Jiangsu Key Laboratory of TCM Evaluation and Translational Research, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211198, China; School of Traditional Chinese Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University; Nanjing, Jiangsu 211198, China. Electronic address:

Ethnopharmacological Relevance: Tibetan medicine has a history of 3800 years. Anzhijinhua San (AZJHS) which is a traditional Tibetan medicine was effective in the treatment of indigestion, anorexia and cold diarrhea etc. However, the effects of AZJHS on allergic diarrhea have not been reported. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2019.01.020DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Home-based cow's milk reintroduction using a milk ladder in children less than 3 years old with IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy.

Clin Exp Allergy 2019 Feb 8. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Children's Allergy Service, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, United Kingdom.

Background: The development of tolerance to cow's milk in allergic children is best determined by supervised baked milk exposure. Widely recommended hospital-based challenges can potentially delay contact because of resources limitations.

Objective: We sought to determine the efficacy and safety of our low-dose home-based reintroduction programme. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cea.13366DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Guiding Principles for the Recognition, Diagnosis, and Management of Infants with Anaphylaxis: An Expert Panel Consensus.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Division of Allergy and Immunology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn.

Infant anaphylaxis is an emerging risk, with food allergy the most common cause. Although the presentation of anaphylaxis involves the same systems as in older children and adults, there are real-world challenges to identifying symptoms of an allergic emergency in nonverbal children, as well as implementing optimal treatment. Recognition of anaphylaxis in infants can be challenging because allergic symptoms and certain normal infant behaviors may overlap. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2018.10.052DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Urban/rural residence effect on emergency department visits arising from food-induced anaphylaxis.

Allergol Int 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Background: Anaphylaxis is a severe and potentially fatal allergic response. Early-life exposure to rural environments may help protect against allergic reaction. This study assesses urban/rural differences by age and race/ethnicity in emergency department (ED) pediatric visit rates for food-induced anaphylaxis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.alit.2018.12.007DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Mechanisms that define transient versus persistent food allergy.

Authors:
M Cecilia Berin

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2019 Feb;143(2):453-457

Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. Electronic address:

Currently, we have a poor understanding of why some food allergies are outgrown and others are not. Deciphering the immune basis of the natural resolution of food allergy will likely provide critical information for developing new therapies for the treatment of persistent food allergies. There are limited cohort studies that have followed children with food allergy over time, but information generated from such cohorts points to features of innate and adaptive immunity, as well as environmental differences (microbiome) that discriminate those with persistent versus transient food allergy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2018.12.991DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6374775PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Is the high risk of anaphylaxis to omalizumab a contraindication to this treatment?

Eur J Dermatol 2019 Feb 8. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

University Hospital, Dermatology-Allergology Department, 54000 Nancy, France, University of Lorraine, 54000 Nancy, France.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/ejd.2018.3454DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Diagnosis and management of drug-induced anaphylaxis in children: an EAACI position paper.

Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Geneva University Hospitals, Department of child and adolescent, Pediatric Allergy Unit, Geneva, Switzerland.

Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) constitute a major and common public health problem, particularly in children. One of the most severe manifestations of DHR is anaphylaxis, which might be associated with a life-threatening risk. During those past decades, anaphylaxis has received particularly a lot of attention and international consensus guidelines have been recently published. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pai.13034DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Choline acetyltransferase-expressing T cells are required to control chronic viral infection.

Science 2019 Feb;363(6427):639-644

The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada.

Although widely studied as a neurotransmitter, T cell-derived acetylcholine (ACh) has recently been reported to play an important role in regulating immunity. However, the role of lymphocyte-derived ACh in viral infection is unknown. Here, we show that the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of ACh production, is robustly induced in both CD4 and CD8 T cells during lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection in an IL-21-dependent manner. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aau9072DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Delayed Anaphylaxis to Mammalian Meat: A Fascinating Disease and Captivating Story.

S D Med 2018 Oct;71(10):463-465

Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meat is a newly recognized IgE-mediated syndrome associated with Lone Star tick bites. IgE-mediated anaphylaxis classically occurs within one hour of exposure to the allergen, which is typically a protein epitope. However, in this disease, circulating antibodies to a carbohydrate, alpha-gal (galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose), stimulate the anaphylactic cascade with hives, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, respiratory distress and anaphylactic shock developing after ingestion of beef, pork or lamb meat. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 2018
2 Reads

Identification of children with anaphylaxis at low risk of receiving acute inpatient therapies.

PLoS One 2019 7;14(2):e0211949. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Division of Emergency Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

Objective: Opportunity exists to reduce unnecessary hospitalizations for children with anaphylaxis given wide variation in admission rates across U.S. emergency departments (EDs). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0211949PLOS
February 2019
1 Read

Are outcome measures in allergic diseases relevant for the WHO's International Classification of Diseases in allergology?

Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Division of Allergy, Department of Pulmonology, Hôpital Arnaud de Villeneuve, University Hospital of Montpellier, Montpellier.

Purpose Of Review: To review and understand the impact of the outcome measures of allergic and hypersensitivity conditions for the WHO's International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and its impact in the management of anaphylaxis and identify potential strategies to improve patients' care and prevention.

Recent Findings: The pioneer chapter addressed to allergic and hypersensitivity conditions in the 11th version of the WHO's ICD is the result of the evidence-based academic technical actions consistently following of collaborations of the allergy community and integrated international initiatives in order to reach quality outcomes measures of allergies worldwide.

Summary: Allergic and hypersensitivity conditions are increasing worldwide, however, they have never been well represented in the international classification systems, such as the ICD. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACI.0000000000000524DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Sonographic changes of the gallbladder associated with anaphylaxis in dogs.

Authors:

J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio) 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vec.12811DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Safety and Toxicity of Recombinant Methioninase and Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) Recombinant Methioninase in Primates.

Methods Mol Biol 2019 ;1866:211-229

AntiCancer Japan, Tokyo, Japan.

Methionine (MET) is a general metabolic therapeutic target in cancer, whereby cancer cells have an elevated requirement for MET, termed MET dependence. We have developed recombinant L-methionine α-deamino-γ-mercaptomethane lyase (recombinant methioninase [rMETase, EC 4.4. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-8796-2_16DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Allergic Reactions Captured by Voluntary Reporting.

J Patient Saf 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Edward P. Lawrence Center for Quality and Safety, Massachusetts General Hospital and the Massachusetts General Professional Organization.

Background: The epidemiology of hospital adverse reactions (ARs), particularly allergic reactions, or hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), is poorly defined. To determine priorities for allergy safety in healthcare, we identified and described safety reports of allergic reactions.

Methods: We searched the safety report database of a large academic medical center from April 2006 to March 2016 using 101 complete, truncated, and/or misspelled key words related to allergic symptoms, treatments, and culprits (e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PTS.0000000000000568DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Efficacy of Sugammadex in Preventing Skin Test Reaction in a Patient With Confirmed Rocuronium Anaphylaxis: A Case Report.

A A Pract 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

From the Department of Anesthesiology, Hospital Foch, Suresnes, France.

The curative role of sugammadex has been challenged in several observations of rocuronium-induced anaphylaxis because sugammadex may not completely encapsulate the molecule of rocuronium. In such conditions, rocuronium remains able to cause immunoglobulin E cross-linkage and the anaphylaxis mechanism can continue. We describe a case of rocuronium-induced anaphylaxis in which clinical improvement followed sugammadex administration. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/XAA.0000000000000973DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Current and Future Treatment of Peanut Allergy.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2019 Feb;7(2):357-365

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.

Based on productive translational research programs conducted over the last 20 years, the clinical landscape of peanut allergy is now rapidly changing. In this review, we review data from recent trials of investigational peanut oral and epicutaneous immunotherapies, explore the pipeline of novel therapies in early development, and identify future research needs and priorities. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2018.11.049DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Management of Peanut Allergy.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2019 Feb;7(2):345-355.e2

Section of Allergy and Immunology, Children's Hospital Colorado, Food Challenge and Research Unit, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colo.

Peanut allergy is a growing public health concern in westernized countries. Peanut allergy is characterized as an often severe and lifelong allergy, which can have detrimental effects on quality of life and trigger anxiety. Although multiple therapeutic options are emerging, the focus of current management strategies is strict peanut avoidance and carriage of self-injectable epinephrine. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2018.10.043DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Activation mechanisms and multifaceted effects of mast cells in ischemia reperfusion injury.

Exp Cell Res 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital School of Medicine, Tongji University, 301 Middle Yanchang Road, Shanghai 200072, PR China. Electronic address:

Mast cells (MCs) are tissue resident effector cells that form an important part of the immune system's first-line of defence against various pathogenic challenges. They are well known for their roles in anaphylaxis and allergy; however, increasing evidence implicates MCs in a wide range of pathologies. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury elicits an inflammatory response and triggers the program of tissue damage and restoration, as well as immune regulation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yexcr.2019.01.022DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Epidemiology and trends of anaphylaxis in the United States, 2004-2016.

Int Forum Allergy Rhinol 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Office of Biostatistics, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX.

Background: No national study has examined the epidemiology of anaphylaxis after introduction of the codes of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Health Related Problems, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10 CM). Our objective was to examine the trends in incidence and hospitalization rates in the United States utilizing ICD-9 and ICD-10 CM codes.

Methods: We used the Clinformatics database from 2004 to 2016. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/alr.22293DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

A case of anaphylaxis to alemtuzumab.

J Neurol 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-019-09214-2DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

A survey of anaphylaxis etiology and treatment.

Med Gas Res 2018 Oct-Dec;8(4):129-134. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Department of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Identifying the causes of anaphylaxis which is an acute, potentially fatal systemic reaction is very important in every community. Treatment strategies and pitfalls should also be determined. We sought to determine the most common triggers of anaphylaxis, clinical manifestations and treatment strategies in Mashhad, northeast of Iran. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2045-9912.248262DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6352571PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Venomous Bites, Stings, and Poisoning: An Update.

Authors:
David A Warrell

Infect Dis Clin North Am 2019 Mar;33(1):17-38

Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. Electronic address:

This article discusses the epidemiology, prevention, clinical features, and treatment of venomous bites by snakes, lizards, and spiders; stings by fish, jellyfish, echinoderms, insects, and scorpions; and poisoning by ingestion of fish, turtles, and shellfish. Invertebrate stings cause fatalities by anaphylaxis, secondary to acquired hypersensitivity (Hymenoptera, such as bees, wasps, and ants; and jellyfish), and by direct envenoming (scorpions, spiders, jellyfish, and echinoderms). Simple preventive techniques, such as wearing protective clothing, using a flashlight at night, and excluding venomous animals from sleeping quarters, are of paramount importance to reduce the risk of venomous bites and stings. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.idc.2018.10.001DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Presentation and natural history of progestogen hypersensitivity.

Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2019 Feb 26;122(2):156-159. Epub 2018 Oct 26.

Jeff and Penny Vinik Center for Allergic Diseases Research, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address:

Objective: To review the published medical literature on the clinical presentation, risk factors, and natural history of hypersensitivity reactions to progestogens.

Data Sources: Through the use of PubMed, we conducted a review of allergy, dermatology, and obstetric literature for cases and case series of patients with hypersensitivity reactions to exogenous or endogenous progestogens. There are no longitudinal, prospective studies related to progestogen hypersensitivity. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2018.10.023DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Improving drug allergy management in Australia: education, communication and accurate information.

Med J Aust 2019 Feb 28;210(2):62-64. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5694/mja18.00467DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Drug-induced anaphylactic reactions in children: A retrospective analysis of 159 validated spontaneous reports.

Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Research Division, Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM), Bonn, Germany.

Purpose: The main objective of this study was to analyze validated cases of drug-induced anaphylactic reactions in children with regard to incriminated drugs, clinical characteristics, and associated factors. A further objective was to compare differences in incriminated drugs and characteristics between validated cases and a reference excluding anaphylactic reaction cases (basic dataset).

Methods: Spontaneous reports of anaphylactic reactions in children (0-17 years) registered between January 2000 to December 2016 were extracted from the adverse drug reaction database of the German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pds.4726DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Seed storage 2S albumins are predictive indicators of exclusive Anacardiaceae cross-reactivity.

Clin Exp Allergy 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Pistachio (Pistachio vera) and cashew nut (Anacardium occidentale), members of the Anacardiaceae family, account for a significant percentage of food allergies worldwide [1]. Nuts are one of the main causes of food anaphylaxis, eliciting a significant number of life-threatening reactions, which are aggravated by the fact that these allergens are often hidden in processed foods. Variability of allergic phenotypes to nut allergens with complex cross-reactivity profiles complicates clinical management of the patient [2]. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cea.13357DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Allergic reactions after vaccination: translating guidelines into clinical practice.

Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

SOS Allergologia e Immunologia Clinica, Misericordia e Dolce, Italy.

Summary: Vaccination represents one of the most powerful medical interventions on global health. Despite being safe, sustainable, and effective against infectious and in some cases also non-infectious diseases, it's nowadays facing general opinion's hesitancy because of a false perceived risk of adverse events. Adverse reactions to vaccines are relatively rare, instead, and those recognizing a hypersensitivity mechanism are even rarer. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.eurannallergyimm.com/cont/online-first/654/review
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.23822/EurAnnACI.1764-1489.86DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Venom Immunotherapy: A 20-year experience with an ultra-rush protocol (210-min)

Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2019 01 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Serviço de Imunoalergologia, Hospital de Santa Maria, Centro Hospitalar Universitário de Lisboa Norte (CHULN), Lisboa, Portugal.

Summary: Ultra-rush (UR) are induction protocols used in venom immunotherapy (VIT). To evaluate the adverse reactions during a 210-minutes UR and determine possible risk factors. Retrospective study of 129 patients submitted to UR with VIT in the last 20 years. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23822/EurAnnACI.1764-1489.85DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Administering intravenous therapy in patients' homes.

Authors:
Drew Payne

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Feb;24(2):67-71

Community staff nurse, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London, UK Member of the Royal College of Nursing.

Intravenous therapy in patients' homes is a relatively new procedure in the community nursing practice. This article looks at the practicalities of administering home IV therapy from the following aspects: hand hygiene; how to adjust IV therapy practices to the home environment; care of the IV access site including appropriate dressings; identifying and reacting to problems; maintaining a safe environment when performing IV therapy in a patient's home; anaphylaxis and how to identify and manage it; and the need for training to perform home IV therapy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.2.67DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Bermuda grass pollen allergen implicated in clinically relevant cross-reactivity to multiple grains: A case report.

J Occup Health 2019 Jan;61(1):128-134

Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, COMWEL Incheon Hospital, Korea Workers' Compensation & Welfare Service, Incheon, Republic of Korea.

Background: Anaphylaxis is a severe and potentially fatal type of allergic reaction and is characterized by the rapid development of symptoms in the respiratory and circulatory systems, possibly leading to death if not treated properly. Occupational anaphylaxis, which does not exhibit significant differences in pathogenesis from the nonoccupational form, develops in response to work-related triggers. However, the onset of occupational anaphylaxis can also be triggered by other factors. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/1348-9585.12038DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Acute coronary stent thrombosis: A case of type 3 Kounis syndrome.

J Cardiol Cases 2019 Jan 23;19(1):33-35. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Cardiology Unit, Sant'Anna Hospital, Catanzaro, Italy.

Kounis syndrome refers to an acute coronary syndrome, consequent to an allergic reaction. It results from mast cell degranulation with subsequent release of numerous inflammatory mediators, leading to coronary vasospasm, atheromatous plaque rupture, or stent thrombosis. Here, we describe the case of a 47-year-old Caucasian man with acute stent thrombosis, as a consequence of allergic reaction to contrast media. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S18785409183009
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jccase.2018.09.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6342681PMC
January 2019
4 Reads

The extract, the molecular allergen or both for the in vitro diagnosis of peach and peanut sensitization?

Clin Chim Acta 2019 Jan 25. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Allergy Diseases Center "Prof. G. Bonsignore", Institute of Biomedicine and Molecular Immunology "A. Monroy" (IBIM)-National Research Council (CNR), Palermo, Italy.

Introduction: Identifying the target molecule in food allergies, helps to assess the risk of anaphylaxis in a patient. Lipid Transfer Protein is the most frequent cause of food allergies in the Mediterranean area. The diagnosis based on allergenic extracts, suffers from a high variability in the results because some important allergenic molecules are lacking. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cca.2019.01.016DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

In Vivo Anti-inflammatory and Antiallergic Activity of Pure Naringenin, Naringenin Chalcone, and Quercetin in Mice.

J Nat Prod 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBER-OBN) , Instituto de Salud Carlos III , E-28029 Madrid , Spain.

Flavonoids, found in almost all fruits and vegetables, belong to a class of plant secondary metabolites with a polyphenolic structure and have properties with health-improving potential. However, few experimental studies on the effects of flavonoids have been carried out in vivo after external application and using pure compounds. Aiming to fill this gap, in this study we tested the topical anti-inflammatory and antiallergic activity of three flavonoids of high purity, naringenin, naringenin chalcone, and quercetin, in mouse models. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jnatprod.8b00366DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The global incidence and prevalence of anaphylaxis in children in the general population: a systematic review.

Allergy 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria, 3052, Australia.

Background: Despite an increasing number of publications from individual countries and regions, there is still no systematic review of the global epidemiology of anaphylaxis in the general paediatric population.

Methods: We conducted a systematic review, using a protocol registered and published with the international prospective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO). Results were reported following PRISMA guidelines. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/all.13732DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads