2 results match your criteria Amphibia-reptilia[Journal]

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Induction of Metamorphosis Causes Differences in Sex-Specific Allocation Patterns in Axolotls () that Have Different Growth Histories.

Amphib Reptil 2015 Dec 3;49(4):621-626. Epub 2015 Feb 3.

Department of Biology and Amphibian Growth Project, Minot State University, Minot, North Dakota 58707 USA.

We tested the hypothesis that salamanders growing at different rates would have allocation patterns that differ among male and female metamorphic and larval salamanders. We raised individual axolotls, , on four food regimes: constant high growth (throughout the experiment), constant low growth (restricted throughout the experiment), high growth switched to low growth (ad libitum switched after 140 d to restricted), and low growth switched to high growth (restricted switched after 140 d to ad libitum). Because axolotls are obligate paedomorphs, we exposed half of the salamanders to thyroid hormone to induce metamorphosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1670/14-141DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5943044PMC
December 2015

Characterisation of nine new polymorphic microsatellite loci in the reticulated glass frog (Centrolenidae).

Amphib Reptil 2014 ;35(2):243-246

Department of Integrative Zoology, University of Vienna, Althanstraße 14, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.

Here we document the development of thirteen novel microsatellite markers for the reticulated glass frog (Centrolenidae). Nine of those markers were polymorphic and contained between 4 and 34 alleles per locus (mean = 20.3) in 138 individuals (91 males, 47 females) from the field site 'La Gamba', Costa Rica. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685381-00002940DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4122515PMC
January 2014
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