389 results match your criteria American journal on intellectual and developmental disabilities[Journal]


Impact of Caregiver Burden on Quality of Life for Parents of Adult Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Mar;124(2):145-156

Christina N. Marsack-Topolewski, Eastern Michigan University; and Heather L. Church, University of Western Ontario.

This study sought to examine the impact of time, developmental, emotional, and financial burdens on the quality of life (QOL) for parents (aged 50+) of an adult child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants ( N = 320) completed a web-based survey and could indicate interest in participating in one-on-one follow up interviews. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that two variables, developmental burden and impact of caregiving on finances, were statistically significant predictors of parents' QOL. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.2.145DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Mar;124(2):188-189

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Does the Development of Syntax Comprehension Show a Premature Asymptote Among Persons With Down Syndrome? A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Mar;124(2):131-144

Bruno Facon, Univ. de Lille, CNRS, CHU Lille, UMR 9193 - SCALab - Sciences Cognitives et Sciences Affectives, F-59000 Lille, France; and David Magis, Department of Education, University of Liège, Belgium.

Uncertainty persists regarding the post-childhood trajectory of syntactic acquisition of persons with Down syndrome (DS). In some studies, asymptote is reached in the early teens, whereas others find syntax continuing to develop at least into early adulthood. This study addressed the issue using a cross-sectional approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.2.131DOI Listing
March 2019
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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Mar;124(2):186-187

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.2.186DOI Listing

Description of Routes in People With Intellectual Disability.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Mar;124(2):116-130

Yannick Courbois and Hursula Mengue-Topio, Université de Lille, France; Mark Blades, The University of Sheffield, UK; Emily K Farran, University of Surrey, UK; and Pascal Sockeel, Université de Lille, France.

The ability to describe routes was assessed in participants with intellectual disability (ID) and participants without ID matched on chronological age (CA) or on mental age (MA). In two experiments, participants learned a route through a virtual environment until they reached a learning criterion. They were then asked to externalize their spatial knowledge in a verbal description task, a landmark recognition task, or a map completion task. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.2.116DOI Listing

Active Support Training, Staff Assistance, and Engagement of Individuals With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in the United States: Randomized Controlled Trial.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Mar;124(2):157-173

Xueqin Qian, Sheryl A. Larson, and Renáta Tichá, Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; Roger Stancliffe, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, 1825, Australia; and Sandra L Pettingell, Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

Two non-U.S. quasi-experimental studies reported Active Support training was associated with increased engagement in individuals with IDD, but no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) exist. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.2.157DOI Listing
March 2019
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Family Quality of Life and Its Correlates Among Parents of Children and Adults With Intellectual Disability.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Mar;124(2):99-115

Thomas L. Boehm, Wheaton College; and Erik W. Carter, Vanderbilt University.

All families, including those impacted by disability, desire and deserve opportunities for high quality of life. This study focused on family quality of life (FQOL) among 529 parents with children or adults with intellectual disability (ID). Parents reported moderate to high levels of FQOL satisfaction, with some variability across domains. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.2.99DOI Listing
March 2019
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Transition-Age Medicaid Coverage for Adolescents With Autism and Adolescents With Intellectual Disability.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Mar;124(2):174-185

Lindsay L. Shea and Robert Field, Drexel University; Ming Xie and Steven Marcus, University of Pennsylvania; Craig Newschaffer, Drexel University; and David Mandell, University of Pennsylvania.

Although the majority of adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) rely on healthcare coverage through Medicaid during their transition into adulthood, little is known about their continuing eligibility. This study used Medicaid Analytic Extract (MAX) data to examine Medicaid coverage in a national sample using a cohort of adolescents with ASD ( n = 4,179) and a like-aged cohort with intellectual disability (ID, n = 21,844) over 5 years using survival analysis and Cox regression models. More than 1 in 4 adolescents with ASD lost coverage and fewer than half subsequently regained it. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.2.174DOI Listing
March 2019
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Similarities in Functional Play and Differences in Symbolic Play of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Jan;124(1):77-91

Kathy Thiemann-Bourque, University of Kansas, Juniper Gardens Children's Project; Lynette K. Johnson, Delta Behavioral Group, PLLC; and Nancy C. Brady, University of Kansas, Speech, Language, and Hearing Department.

Contradictory reports of play strengths and weaknesses for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) persist in the literature. We compared the play of 19 children with ASD to 19 typically developing (TD) children matched on language and cognitive skills. All children were verbal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.1.77DOI Listing
January 2019
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A Description of the Educational Setting Among Individuals With Fragile X Syndrome.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Jan;124(1):57-76

Rebecca Nash, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health; Catharine Riley and Pangaja Paramsothy, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Kendra Gilbertson, ORISE, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Melissa Raspa and Anne Wheeler, RTI International; and Eric J. Dziuban and Georgina Peacock, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) display wide-ranging intellectual and behavioral abilities that affect daily life. We describe the educational setting of students with FXS and assess the relationships between school setting, co-occurring conditions, and functional ability using a national survey sample ( n = 982). The majority of students with FXS in this sample have formal individualized education plans, spend part of the day outside regular classrooms, and receive modifications when in a regular classroom. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.1.57DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6442477PMC
January 2019
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A Primer on Single-Case Research Designs: Contemporary Use and Analysis.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Jan;124(1):35-56

Jennifer R. Ledford, Erin E. Barton, Katherine E. Severini, and Kathleen N. Zimmerman, Vanderbilt University.

The overarching purpose of this article is to provide an introduction to the use of rigorous single-case research designs (SCRDs) in special education and related fields. Authors first discuss basic design types and research questions that can be answered with SCRDs, examine threats to internal validity and potential ways to control for and detect common threats, and provide guidelines for selection of specific designs. Following, contemporary standards regarding rigor, measurement, description, and outcomes are presented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.1.35DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Improvement in Mental Health Outcomes and Caregiver Service Experiences Associated With the START Program.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Jan;124(1):25-34

Luther G. Kalb, Assistant Professor, Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Department of Neuropsychology, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD; Joan Beasley, Director of the Center for START Services, Institute on Disability and National Center for START Services, University of New Hampshire; Andrea Caoilli, Director of Quality Assurance, Institute on Disability and National Center for START Services, University of New Hampshire; and Ann Klein, SIRS Database Manager, Institute on Disability and National Center for START Services, University of New Hampshire.

This study examined outcomes from the Systemic, Therapeutic, Assessment, Resources, and Treatment (START) program, a community-based tertiary care model for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and mental health needs. The sample included 111 START service users and their family caregivers, who were receiving START Clinical Team services, located in the Northeast and Southwest regions of the United States. Results from the analyses found a significant 1-year pre-post improvement in caregiver service experiences and mental health symptoms of the service user. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.1.25DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Early Predictors of Later Expressive Language in Boys With Fragile X Syndrome.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Jan;124(1):11-24

Heather Fielding-Gebhardt and Steven F. Warren, University of Kansas.

The predictive ability of early consonant inventory and intentional communication on later expressive language was examined in 36 boys with fragile X syndrome (FXS). Autism symptom severity was included as a potential moderator. Participants were visited in their homes twice over a 6-year period, and mother-child interactions were videotaped, coded, and transcribed behavior by behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.1.11DOI Listing
January 2019
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The Prevalence of OSA Among an Adult Population With Down Syndrome Referred to a Medical Clinic.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Jan;124(1):4-10

Michelle Cornacchia, Geisinger Health System; Janis Sethness and Philip Alapat, Baylor College of Medicine; Yu-Hsiang Lin, UCLA Health; and Cynthia Peacock, Baylor College of Medicine.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder affecting approximately 16% of adults (24% of men and 9% of women), and, if untreated, it can cause significant complications ( Young, 2009 ). This study evaluates 56 adult patients with Down syndrome and analyzed retrospective data to determine the: (1) prevalence of OSA, (2) severity of OSA, and (3) association between body mass index (BMI) and OSA. Of those participants that had polysomnography (PSG) testing available, 82. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.1.4DOI Listing
January 2019
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The Past and the Future Are in the Present: The Continuing Evolution of AJIDD.

Authors:
Frank J Symons

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Jan;124(1):1-3

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.1.1DOI Listing
January 2019

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Jan;124(1):94-95

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January 2019

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Jan;124(1):92-93

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January 2019

The Relationship Between Children's Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Nov;123(6):529-544

Sarah Dababnah, University of Maryland, Baltimore; Cynthia Fraga Rizo, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and Karen Campion, Katherine D. Downton, and Helen M. Nichols, University of Maryland, Baltimore.

Children exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV) can experience negative social, emotional, behavioral, and academic outcomes. A growing body of research has examined the relationship between intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and IPV exposure. We systematically reviewed the literature for research exploring this relationship and found a limited number of studies meeting inclusion criteria ( N = 11). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.6.529DOI Listing
November 2018
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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Nov;123(6):585-586

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.6.585DOI Listing
November 2018

The PRETEND Program: Evaluating the Feasibility of a Remote Parent-Training Intervention for Children With Prader-Willi Syndrome.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Nov;123(6):574-584

Olena Zyga, Sandra W. Russ, and Anastasia Dimitropoulos, Case Western Reserve University.

Research has shown that children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) have social-cognitive challenges and decreased quality parent-child interactions. However, given the low prevalence rate, developing interventions for children with PWS is faced with the significant challenge of enrolling enough participants for local studies. To better understand the feasibility and acceptability of telehealth, the current study delivered a 6-week remote parent training intervention to 15 primary caregivers of a child with PWS (ages 3-6). Read More

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http://www.aaiddjournals.org/doi/10.1352/1944-7558-123.6.574
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.6.574DOI Listing
November 2018
10 Reads

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Nov;123(6):587-588

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November 2018

The Association Between Continuity of Primary Care and Preventive Cancer Screening in Women With Intellectual Disability.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Nov;123(6):499-513

Natasha Plourde, University of Ottawa, Canada; Hilary K. Brown, University of Toronto Scarborough, Canada; Simone Vigod, Women's College Hospital, Canada; and Virginie Cobigo, University of Ottawa, Canada.

Women with intellectual disability have low screening rates for breast and cervical cancer. This population-based cohort study examined the association between the level of primary care continuity and breast and cervical cancer screening rates in women with intellectual disability. Data were obtained from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services. Read More

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http://www.aaiddjournals.org/doi/10.1352/1944-7558-123.6.499
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November 2018
19 Reads

Psychometric Properties of the Spanish Version of the Self-Determination Inventory Student Self-Report: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Nov;123(6):545-557

Cristina Mumbardó-Adam, Facultat de Psicologia, Ciències de l'Educació i de l'Esport Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Llull. Barcelona, Spain; Joan Guàrdia-Olmos, Departament de Psicologia Social i Psicologia Quantitativa. Facultat de Psicologia. Institut de Neurociències. Institute of Complex Systems (UBICS), Universitat de Barcelona, Spain; Climent Giné, Facultat de Psicologia, Ciències de l'Educació i de l'Esport Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Llull. Barcelona, Spain; Karrie A. Shogren, University of Kansas, Beach Center on Disability and Kansas University Center on Developmental Disabilities, Lawrence, KS; and Eva Vicente Sánchez, Facultad de Educación, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain.

Instruments to measure self-determination have only been available in the Spanish language to date, for adolescents with intellectual disability (ID). However, given the development of a new measure of self-determination for youth with and without disabilities, the Self-Determination Inventory, there is a need to adapt and validate this tool in the Spanish language so as to provide practitioners with a psychometrically strong measure of self-determination. This study provides evidence of reliability and validity of the Spanish version of the scale, empirically tested with a sample of 620 youth with and without disabilities in Spain. Read More

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http://www.aaiddjournals.org/doi/10.1352/1944-7558-123.6.545
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November 2018
16 Reads

Associations Between Medical History, Cognition, and Behavior in Youth With Down Syndrome: A Report From the Down Syndrome Cognition Project.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Nov;123(6):514-528

Tracie C. Rosser, Emory University; Jamie O. Edgin, University of Arizona; George T. Capone, Kennedy Krieger Institute; Debra R. Hamilton, Emory University; Emily G. Allen, Emory University; Kenneth J. Dooley, Emory University; Payal Anand, University of Arizona; John F. Strang, Children's National Medical Center; A. Chelsea Armour, Children's National Medical Center; Michelle A. Frank-Crawford, Kennedy Krieger Institute; Marie Moore Channell, MIND Institute; Elizabeth I. Pierpont, University of Wisconsin; Eleanor Feingold, University of Pittsburgh; Cheryl L. Maslen, Oregon Health & Science University; Roger H. Reeves, Johns Hopkins University; and Stephanie L. Sherman, Emory University.

The cause of the high degree of variability in cognition and behavior among individuals with Down syndrome (DS) is unknown. We hypothesized that birth defects requiring surgery in the first years of life (congenital heart defects and gastrointestinal defects) might affect an individual's level of function. We used data from the first 234 individuals, age 6-25 years, enrolled in the Down Syndrome Cognition Project (DSCP) to test this hypothesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.6.514DOI Listing
November 2018
3 Reads

Using a Functional Analysis Followed by Differential Reinforcement and Extinction to Reduce Challenging Behaviors in Children With Smith-Magenis Syndrome.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Nov;123(6):558-573

Jennifer Hodnett, Marcus Autism Center, Atlanta, GA; Mindy Scheithauer, Nathan A. Call, Joanna Lomas Mevers, and Sarah J. Miller, Marcus Autism Center; Emory University School of Medicine; Atlanta, GA.

Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a genetic disorder, commonly caused by a 17p11.2 deletion, affecting the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 gene. It affects approximately 1 in 25,000 individuals, with over 90% engaging in challenging behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.6.558DOI Listing
November 2018

Identifying Needs-Based Groupings Among People Accessing Intellectual Disability Services.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Sep;123(5):426-442

Ashok Roy, Solihull Community Services and Royal College of Psychiatrists, England.

There is increasing emphasis on needs-led service provision for people with intellectual disability (ID). This study outlines the statistical cluster analysis of clinical data from 1,692 individuals accessing secondary care ID services in the United Kingdom (U.K. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.5.426DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Employment, Income, and SSI Effects of Postsecondary Education for People With Intellectual Disability.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Sep;123(5):412-425

Maria Paiewonsky, Institute for Community Inclusion, School for Global Inclusion and Social Development, University of Massachusetts Boston.

The low employment rates of individuals with intellectual disability (ID) are a major concern. This study examined the effect of postsecondary education on employment atrnd earnings for individuals with ID and the effect of state variation on those outcomes. Rehabilitation Services Administration 911 (RSA-911) files for 2008-2013 were analyzed (n = 11,280 individuals with ID). Read More

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http://www.aaiddjournals.org/doi/10.1352/1944-7558-123.5.412
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September 2018
22 Reads

Systematic Review of Interventions Involving Aided AAC Modeling for Children With Complex Communication Needs.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Sep;123(5):443-473

Carly B. Gilson, Texas A & M University.

Building the communicative competence of individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) requires intervention and support. This systematic review examined experimental studies involving aided AAC modeling to promote the expressive communication of children and youth (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.5.443DOI Listing
September 2018

Antenatal Hospitalization Among U.S. Women With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Sep;123(5):399-411

Tiffany A. Moore Simas, University of Massachusetts Medical School.

This population-based retrospective cohort study examines the prevalence of hospital utilization during pregnancy and the primary reason for antenatal hospital utilization among women with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Massachusetts residents with in-state deliveries that were ≥ 20 weeks gestational age were included via data from the 2002-2009 Massachusetts Pregnancy to Early Life Longitudinal Data System. Among women with IDD, 54. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.5.399DOI Listing
September 2018

Evaluation of Pediatrician Adherence to the American Academy of Pediatrics Health Supervision Guidelines for Down Syndrome.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Sep;123(5):387-398

Meghan E. O'Neill, Alexandra Ryan, Soyang Kwon, and Helen J. Binns, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago.

The American Academy of Pediatrics's guideline on health supervision for children with Down syndrome (DS) offers pediatricians guidance to improve detection of comorbid conditions. Pediatrician adherence has not yet been comprehensively evaluated. Medical records of 31 children with DS who received primary care at two urban academic clinic sites from 2008-2012 were reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.5.387DOI Listing
September 2018
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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Sep;123(5):497-498

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September 2018

The Effects of a Text-Centered Literacy Curriculum for Students With Intellectual Disability.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Sep;123(5):474-494

Jill H. Allor, Diane B. Gifford, Francesca G. Jones, Stephanie Al Otaiba, Paul Yovanoff, Miriam B. Ortiz, and Jennifer P. Cheatham, Southern Methodist University.

The purpose of this study was to examine the promise and feasibility of a newly developed curriculum to teach early literacy skills to students with intellectual disability (ID) and students with low IQs. The curriculum texts were written to include familiar settings, high frequency words, natural syntax, and cumulative practice. A single-case design was used with multiple baseline across levels of instruction and included eight participants who had IQs spanning from 40 to 63. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.5.474DOI Listing
September 2018

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Sep;123(5):495-496

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September 2018

Predictors Associated With Paid Employment Status of Community and Technical College Students With Intellectual Disability.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Jul;123(4):329-343

Frank A. Smith and Clare K. Papay, Institute for Community Inclusion, University of Massachusetts, Boston.

The present study sought to identify predictors associated with paid employment outcomes for community and technical college students with intellectual disability (ID). Data used were collected from the Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students With Intellectual Disabilities (TPSID) implemented in two community and technical colleges in the upper Midwest. The participants included 228 students with ID attending college who received supports based on the Check & Connect model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.4.329DOI Listing
July 2018
6 Reads

Using Medicaid Data to Characterize Persons With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Five U.S. States.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Jul;123(4):371-381

Brian S. Armour, Division of Human Development and Disability, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

This project sought to identify Medicaid members with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in five states (Delaware, Iowa, Massachusetts, New York, and South Carolina) to develop a cohort for subsequent analyses of medical conditions and service utilization. We estimated that over 300,000 Medicaid members in these states had IDD. All members with diagnostic codes for IDD were identified and the three most frequent diagnoses were unspecified intellectual disability, autism or pervasive developmental disorder, and cerebral palsy. Read More

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http://www.aaiddjournals.org/doi/10.1352/1944-7558-123.4.371
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July 2018
111 Reads

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Jul;123(4):382-383

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Detecting Changes in Support Needs Over Time.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Jul;123(4):315-328

Karrie A. Shogren, James R. Thompson, Leslie A. Shaw, Elizabeth M. Grandfield, and Mayumi Hagiwara, University of Kansas.

Assessment of support needs has received significant attention in the disability field, however, little is known about the stability of support needs scores over time. Data from 82 adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) who were reassessed with the Supports Intensity Scale-Adult (SIS-A) version as well as the SIS-A Annual Review Protocol (SIS-A ARP) were analyzed. The findings suggest stability of SIS-A scores over a one- to three-year period in adults with IDD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.4.315DOI Listing

Characteristics and Outcomes of People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Participating in a Mental Health Court.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Jul;123(4):359-370

Sarah E. Riley, Saint Louis University.

This study compares characteristics and outcomes of 70 defendants with and 1,122 without intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) participating in a mental health court. Demographic and clinical characteristics differed, but criminal justice or program characteristics did not. Age, race, marital status, living situation, court location, health insurance status, and likelihood of mental illness or substance abuse diagnosis differed between the two groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.4.359DOI Listing
July 2018
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Trends in the Educational Placement of Students With Intellectual Disability in the United States Over the Past 40 Years.

Authors:
Matthew E Brock

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Jul;123(4):305-314

Matthew E. Brock, Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy, Ohio State University.

In 1975, federal law mandated that children with disabilities be educated in their least restrictive environment, or alongside peers without disabilities in general education classrooms to the maximum extent appropriate. More than 40 years later, I investigated how national trends in educational placement have changed over time for students with intellectual disability. Specifically, I examined the degree placements have trended toward less restrictive environments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.4.305DOI Listing
July 2018
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Inference From Facial Expressions Among Adolescents and Young Adults With Down Syndrome.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Jul;123(4):344-358

Jacob A. Burack, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University.

The focus of this study was the ability of adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome to infer meaning from facial expressions in the absence of emotion labels and use this inference in order to adjust their behavior. Participants with Down syndrome ( N = 19, mean nonverbal mental age of 5.8 years) and 4- to 7-year-old typically developing children performed a novel task in which happy and angry faces were provided as feedback for a choice made by the participants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.4.344DOI Listing
July 2018
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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 Jul;123(4):384-385

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Lifelong Parenting of Adults With Developmental Disabilities: Growth Trends Over 20 Years in Midlife and Later Life.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 05;123(3):228-240

Frank J. Floyd, Psychology Department, University of Hawaii at Manoa.

This research examined how parenting adults with developmental disabilities affects parental well-being beyond midlife and into old age. Parents of adults with developmental disabilities ( n = 249) and parents of adults without disabilities ( n = 9,016), studied in their early 50s and mid-60s, were longitudinally tracked into their early 70s. Compared to parents of adults without disabilities, parents of adults with disabilities showed a pattern of normative functioning in their 50s, followed by poorer well-being in their mid-60s, and further declines in health and well-being into the early 70s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.3.228DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6442468PMC

Gait Characteristics of Adults With Intellectual Disability.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 05;123(3):283-299

Alyt Oppewal, Dederieke A. M. Festen, and Thessa I. M. Hilgekamp, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Gait is a relevant and complex aspect of motor functioning. Disturbances are related to negative health outcomes. Gait characteristics of 31 adults with intellectual disability (ID) without Down syndrome (DS) (42. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.3.283DOI Listing
May 2018
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Reading in Children With Fragile X Syndrome: Phonological Awareness and Feasibility of Intervention.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 05;123(3):193-211

Jane E. Roberts, University of South Carolina, Columbia.

Individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS) present with significant deficits in reading skills, but scant research exists to understand the characteristics of the reading delays or best practices for reading instruction with this population. Study 1 examined the relationship between phonological awareness and reading skills in individuals with FXS. Study 2 evaluated the feasibility of a web-based reading intervention, which incorporated phonological awareness and phonics instruction but was originally developed for mainstream students, for children with FXS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.3.193DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5998333PMC
May 2018
6 Reads

Behavioral Interventions for Inappropriate Sexual Behavior in Individuals With Developmental Disabilities and Acquired Brain Injury: A Review.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 May;123(3):254-282

Joseph M. Lambert, Vanderbilt University.

Inappropriate sexual behavior (ISB) is a common, but understudied, issue for individuals diagnosed with developmental disabilities (DD), intellectual disability (ID), and/or acquired brain injuries (ABI). We conducted a systematic review to identify, analyze, and synthesize published behavior-analytic approaches to intervention for ISB in DD, ID, or ABI populations. Twenty-three studies employing single-subject research methodology were identified and evaluated using quality indicators described by Horner et al. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.3.254DOI Listing
May 2018
6 Reads

Mental Health and Well-Being in Mothers of Children With Rare Genetic Syndromes Showing Chronic Challenging Behavior: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Study.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 05;123(3):241-253

Chris Oliver, University of Birmingham, UK.

It is well documented that mothers of children with challenging behavior (CB) experience elevated levels of stress and that this persists over time, but less is known about the experience of mothers of children with rare genetic syndromes. This article describes 2 studies, 1 cross-sectional and 1 longitudinal, comparing well-being in mothers of children with Angelman, Cornelia de Lange and Cri du Chat syndrome who have either shown chronic CB ( n = 18) or low/no CB ( n = 26) in the preceding 7 years. The presence of chronic, long-term CB increased maternal stress but not depression or anxiety, and did not influence positive well-being. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.3.241DOI Listing
May 2018
2 Reads

Resúmenes al Español.

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 May;123(3):302-303

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.3.302DOI Listing

Behavioral Problems and Psychosocial Strengths: Unique Factors Contributing to the Behavioral Profile of Youth With Down Syndrome.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 05;123(3):212-227

Peter Prinzie, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

This study aimed to describe problem behaviors and psychosocial strengths, examine the problem-strength interrelations, and evaluate profiles of problems and strengths in youth with Down syndrome (DS). The community-based sample consisted of 67 parents of children with DS aged between 4 and 19 years. Parents reported about the developmental age (Vineland screener), behavioral problems (Child Behavior Checklist), and psychosocial strengths (Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale) of their child. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.3.212DOI Listing
May 2018
1 Read

Résumés en Français.

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 May;123(3):300-301

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-123.3.300DOI Listing

Erratum.

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2017 Nov;122(6):fmi

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-122.6.fmiDOI Listing
November 2017