447 results match your criteria American journal on intellectual and developmental disabilities[Journal]


Social Capital and the Reciprocal Nature of Family Relationships: The Perspective of Individuals With Mild Intellectual Disability.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 May;125(3):170-185

Sanne A. H. Giesbers, Tranzo, Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University, the Netherlands and Dichterbij Innovation and Science, Gennep, the Netherlands; Alexander H. C. Hendriks, School of Pedagogical and Educational Science, Faculty of Social Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Richard P. Hastings, Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK and Centre for Developmental Psychiatry and Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Australia; Andrew Jahoda, Psychological Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK; Tess Tournier, Tranzo, Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University, the Netherlands and ASVZ, Sliedrecht, the Netherlands; and Petri J. C. M. Embregts, Tranzo, Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University, the Netherlands.

Even though family plays a significant role in the lives of people with intellectual disability, little research has included their own views about their families. This study examined how 138 people with mild intellectual disability describe their family group, with a focus on the reciprocal nature of the emotional support in relationships with family members. Participants reported "significant" family members beyond the nuclear family, and parents were seen as the main provider of support. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.3.170DOI Listing

Examining the Impact of the SDLMI and Whose Future Is It? Over a Two-Year Period With Students With Intellectual Disability.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 May;125(3):217-229

Karrie A. Shogren and Tyler A. Hicks, University of Kansas; Kathryn M. Burke, Temple University; Anthony Antosh, and Terri LaPlante, Rhode Island College; and Mark H. Anderson, University of Kansas.

The purpose of this study was to examine self-determination outcome data in the year following a one-year cluster randomized controlled trial (C-RCT) comparing the impacts of a Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction (SDLMI) only condition to a SDLMI + (SDLMI + WF) condition. Using multilevel B-spline model analysis with Bayesian estimation, we examined ongoing patterns of growth after the trial ended and all students were exposed to SDLMI + WF. The findings suggest that the inclusion of an additional year of outcome data provided additional insight into the impact of more intensive intervention conditions over time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.3.217DOI Listing

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 May;125(3):245-246

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.3.245DOI Listing

Do Functional Analyses Probe Learning Histories, Or Create Them? An Exploratory Investigation.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 May;125(3):200-216

Joseph M. Lambert and Nealetta J. Houchins-Juárez, Vanderbilt University.

During functional analysis (FA), therapists arrange contingencies between potential reinforcers and problem behavior. It is unclear whether this fact, in and of itself, facilitates problem behavior's acquisition of new (false-positive) functions. If problem behavior can come under the control of contingencies contrived between it and known reinforcers for which there is no direct history, then outcomes of reinforcer analysis (RA) should perfectly predict FA outcomes. Read More

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Developmental Trajectories of Adaptive Behavior From Toddlerhood to Middle Childhood in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 May;125(3):155-169

Brianne Tomaszewski, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Susan Hepburn, Colorado State University; Audrey Blakeley-Smith, University of Colorado; and Sally J. Rogers, University of California Davis.

Longitudinal growth modeling was utilized to examine adaptive behavior over eight years across the three time points (i.e., ages 2-10). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.3.155DOI Listing

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 May;125(3):243-244

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.3.243DOI Listing

Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Among U.S. Children With and Without Down Syndrome: The National Survey of Children's Health.

Authors:
Keith M Diaz

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 May;125(3):230-242

Keith M. Diaz, Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health, Columbia University Medical Center.

It is unclear whether children with Down syndrome have differing physical activity and sedentary behavior levels compared to typical children. This study addressed this evidence gap in a national sample. Physical activity/sedentary behavior were ascertained by parental report. Read More

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Using Progressive Time Delay to Increase Levels of Peer Imitation During Play With Preschoolers With Disabilities.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 May;125(3):186-199

Rachel Francis, Claire Winchester, Erin E. Barton, Jennifer R. Ledford, and Marina Velez, Vanderbilt University.

Research suggests peer imitation can be taught using systematic procedures and can be embedded into ongoing play contexts with preschool-age children. However, additional research is needed to test procedures that may increase levels of peer imitation with toddlers with disabilities and in generalized contexts. We used a multiple probe across participants research design to evaluate the effectiveness of progressive time delay (PTD) to teach peer imitation to preschoolers with disabilities during a play activity with a peer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.3.186DOI Listing

Coparenting and Child Outcomes in Families of Children Previously Identified With Developmental Delay.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 03;125(2):109-124

Margaret Rosencrans, Ohio State University; and Laura Lee McIntyre, University of Oregon.

The current study explored cross-sectional relations between coparenting quality and child problem behaviors, as measured by parent report and direct observation, in families of school-aged children previously identified with a developmental delay in early childhood. Parents' reports of difficulty with coparenting problems predicted child problem behaviors. For primary caregivers, parenting self-efficacy mediated the relation between coparenting quality and problem behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.2.109DOI Listing

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 Mar;125(2):151-153

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Advancing Knowledge of Down Syndrome Brain Development and Function With Human Stem Cells.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 03;125(2):90-92

Anita Bhattacharyya, Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin - Madison.

Our bodies are made up of over 250 specific cell types, and all initially arise from stem cells during embryonic development. Stem cells have two characteristics that make them unique: (1) they are pluripotent, meaning that they can differentiate into all cell types of the body, and (2) they are capable of self-renewal to generate more of themselves and are thus able to populate an organism. Human pluripotent stem cells were first isolated from human embryos twenty years ago ( Thomson et al. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7169307PMC

Current Research Approaches to Down Syndrome: Translational Research Perspectives.

Authors:
George T Capone

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 03;125(2):93-96

George T. Capone, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins University.

Translational research means different things to different people. In the biomedical research community, translational research is the process of applying knowledge from basic biology and clinical trials to techniques and tools that address critical medical needs such as new therapies. Translational research then is a "bench to bedside" bridge specifically designed to improve health outcomes ( Wetmore & Garner, 2010 ). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.2.93DOI Listing

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 Mar;125(2):148-150

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Mathematics Motivation in Students With Low Cognitive Ability: A Longitudinal Study of Motivation and Relations With Effort, Self-Regulation, and Grades.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 03;125(2):125-147

Danielle Tracey, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia; Alexandre J.S. Morin, Concordia University, Canada; Reinhard Pekrun, University of Munich, and Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, Australian Catholic University, Munich, Germany; A. Katrin Arens, German Institute for International Educational Research, Frankfurt, Germany; Kou Murayama, University of Reading, UK; Stephanie Lichtenfeld, University of Durham, UK; Anne C. Frenzel, University of Munich, Germany; Thomas Goetz, University of Konstanz, Germany & Thurgau University of Teacher Education, Switzerland, Konstanz, Germany; and Christophe Maïano, Université du Québec en Outaouais, Saint-Jérome, Canada.

Expectancy-value theory (EVT) is a popular framework to understand and improve students' motivation. Unfortunately, limited research has verified whether EVT predictions generalize to students with low levels of cognitive ability. This study relies on Grade 5 and 8 data from 177 students with low levels of cognitive ability and a matched sample of 177 students with average to high cognitive ability from the German "Project for the Analysis of Learning and Achievement in Mathematics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.2.125DOI Listing

Fragile X Syndrome-Associated Emergency Department Visits in the United States, 2006-2011.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 03;125(2):103-108

Thuy Quynh N. Do, Catharine Riley, Pangaja Paramsothy, Lijing Ouyang, Julie Bolen, and Scott D. Grosse, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities.

Using national data, we examined emergency department (ED) encounters during 2006-2011 for which a diagnosis code for fragile X syndrome (FXS) was present ( = 7,217). Almost half of ED visits coded for FXS resulted in hospitalization, which is much higher than for ED visits not coded for FXS. ED visits among females coded for FXS were slightly more likely to result in hospitalization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.2.103DOI Listing

The Search for Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease in Down Syndrome.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 03;125(2):97-99

Benjamin L. Handen, Western Psychiatric Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA.

Adults with Down syndrome are at high risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), with most individuals developing clinical dementia by their late 60s. This increased risk for AD has been attributed, at least in part, to triplication and overexpression of the gene for amyloid precursor protein (APP) on chromosome 21 leading to elevated levels of amyloid β peptides. This article offers a brief overview of our current knowledge of AD in the DS population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.2.97DOI Listing

Neurogenesis, Myelination, and Circuitry: The Case for a Distributed Therapeutic Regimen in Down Syndrome.

Authors:
Tarik F Haydar

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 03;125(2):100-102

Tarik F. Haydar, Boston University School of Medicine.

One of the overriding hopes of the Down syndrome (DS) research community is to arrive at a better understanding of how trisomy 21 affects brain development and function, and that doing so will improve quality of life and independence for people with DS. In searching for the underlying causes of intellectual disability in DS, researchers and clinicians have studied how changes to genes and cells may relate to motor and cognitive function. Thus far, alterations in many areas of the central nervous system have been found and it is now known that, beginning before birth, different changes occur in different areas over the course of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.2.100DOI Listing

Plenary Perspectives Special Section.

Authors:
Frank J Symons

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 03;125(2):89

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Adverse Medication Events Related to Hospitalization in the United States: A Comparison Between Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Those Without.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 01;125(1):37-48

Steven R. Erickson and Neil Kamdar, University of Michigan; and Chung-Hsuen Wu, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan.

This study examined the proportion of hospitalizations associated with adverse medication events (AMEs) for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and adults from the general population in the United States using the 2013 National Inpatient Sample (NIS) dataset of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). Adults with IDD had greater odds of having a hospitalization associated with an AME than the general adult population. Unadjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for hospitalization due to any medication for IDD was 2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.1.37DOI Listing
January 2020

Teaching Object Play to Young Children With Disabilities: A Systematic Review of Methods and Rigor.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 01;125(1):14-36

Erin E. Barton, Rebecca Murray, Cecelia O'Flaherty, Erin M. Sweeney, and Stephanie Gossett, Vanderbilt University.

In this systematic review, we examined the rigor and outcomes across 27 object play intervention studies using single-case research methodology. We focused on studies including children age 5 years or younger and examined several descriptive characteristics including materials, instructional packages, and settings. We also analyzed the facilitation and measurement of generalized play and several methodological features including quality, rigor, and visual analysis procedures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.1.14DOI Listing
January 2020

Associated Risk Factors for Depression and Anxiety in Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Five-Year Follow Up.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 01;125(1):49-63

Kelly Hsieh, Haleigh M. Scott, and Sumithra Murthy, University of Illinois at Chicago.

A better understanding of the factors associated with depression and anxiety in people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) is needed to provide guidelines for service providers, clinicians, and researchers as well as to improve the diagnostic process. The current study used a longitudinal dataset to explore demographic, health, and psychosocial risk factors of anxiety and depression in adults with IDD. Women were more likely to have depression while older adults, people with autism, and people with hearing impairments, were more likely to have anxiety. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.1.49DOI Listing
January 2020

Providers' Guidance to Parents and Service Use for Latino Children With Developmental Disabilities.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 01;125(1):64-75

Esther Son, College of Staten Island, The City University of New York; Sandy Magaña, The University of Texas at Austin; Frances D. Martínez-Pedraza, Florida International University; and Susan L. Parish, The Virginia Commonwealth University.

To better understand disparities between Latino and White children with autism or other developmental disabilities (ASD/DD), we examined whether Latino ethnicity predicted the number of specialty care services received by children with severe functional limitations depending on medical providers' responses to parents' initial concerns about their child's development. Through linkage of the Pathways and NS-CSHCN datasets, we found ethnic disparities in the receipt of specialty services associated with providers' responsiveness to parent-reported concerns among children with ASD/DD. Among children with significant functional limitations, Latino children whose parents received passive/reassuring responses from their providers were less likely to receive specialty services than White children with ASD/DD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.1.64DOI Listing
January 2020

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 Jan;125(1):85-86

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January 2020

Evaluating the Risks and Benefits of Genetic and Pharmacologic Interventions for Down Syndrome: Views of Parents.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 01;125(1):1-13

Kirsten A. Riggan and Christina Nyquist, Mayo Clinic; Marsha Michie, Case Western Reserve University; and Megan A. Allyse, Mayo Clinic.

Researchers are investigating new technologies to mitigate or prevent symptoms of Down syndrome (DS), including chromosome silencing and pharmacotherapy. We surveyed parents of individuals with DS to assess their opinions on two hypothetical scenarios describing prenatal chromosome silencing and pediatric pharmacological intervention to improve neurocognition in children with DS. Although a slim majority of participants supported the availability of both therapies, respondent support was contingent on the risks presented, including the risk of miscarriage in the prenatal intervention and the impact of pharmaceuticals on their children's personality. Read More

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January 2020

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 Jan;125(1):87-88

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January 2020

Preliminary Characterization of Parent-Child Interaction in Preschoolers With Prader-Willi Syndrome: The Relationship Between Engagement and Parental Stress.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 01;125(1):76-84

Olena Zyga and Anastasia Dimitropoulos, Case Western Reserve University.

Early parent-child interactions (PCI) impact social cognitive development. Relatedly, children with various developmental disorders exhibit abnormal parental attachment relationships. Parental characteristics and behaviors can impact PCI and socioemotional development as well. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-125.1.76DOI Listing
January 2020

Syntactic Ability of Girls With Fragile X Syndrome: Phonological Memory and Discourse Demands on Complex Sentence Use.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 11;124(6):511-534

Sara T. Kover, University of Washington; and Leonard Abbeduto, University of California, Davis.

This study was designed to establish the extent of delay in complex sentence use by females with fragile X syndrome (FXS) and to identify sources of variability among individuals. Females with FXS ( = 16; 10;2-15;7) and younger typically developing girls ( = 17; 4;1-8;11) were group-wise matched on nonverbal cognition and receptive syntax. Language samples (conversation and narration) yielded syntactic complexity in terms of mean length of C-unit (MLCU) and Developmental Level sentence coding (DLevel; Rosenberg & Abbeduto, 1987 ). Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6876634PMC
November 2019

Seeing Eye to Eye With Threat: Atypical Threat Bias in Children With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 11;124(6):549-567

Abbie M. Popa, Joshua R. Cruz, Ling M. Wong, Danielle J. Harvey, Kathleen Angkustsiri, and Ingrid N. Leckliter, UC Davis, MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA; Koraly Perez-Edgar, Penn State University, University Park; and Tony J. Simon, UC Davis, MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA.

Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) show high rates of anxiety associated with their increased risk of developing schizophrenia. Biased attention is associated with anxiety and is important to investigate in those with 22q11DS given this association. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.6.549DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6927396PMC
November 2019

Quality of Life in Families of Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 11;124(6):535-548

Catherine Mello, The Pennsylvania State University, Berks; Mélina Rivard and Amélie Terroux, Université du Québec à Montréal; and Céline Mercier, Université de Montréal, Québec.

The present study investigated family quality of life (FQOL) as experienced by 493 mothers and fathers (295 families) of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prior to receiving early intervention services in the province of Québec. These families were most satisfied with their physical and material well-being and least satisfied with their family interactions. Children's level of functioning across various standardized and subjective measures were positively associated with parents' FQOL. Read More

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November 2019

Unified Extracurricular Activities as a Pathway to Social Inclusion in High Schools.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 11;124(6):568-582

Gary N. Siperstein, Emily D. McDowell, Holly E. Jacobs, and Jeffrey E. Stokes, University of Massachusetts Boston; and Andrea L. Cahn, Special Olympics.

The present study examined how a multicomponent intervention embedded in a high school's extracurricular framework impacts students' acceptance of peers with intellectual disability (ID). Data were collected from eight high schools, three of which implemented the Special Olympics Unified Champion Schools (UCS) program involving inclusive sports, clubs, and schoolwide events, and five of which did not. A pretest-posttest survey design was used to measure students' attitudes, perceptions, and interactions ( = 1,230). Read More

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November 2019

Play to Teach: Coaching Paraeducators to Facilitate Communication in the Preschool Classroom.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 11;124(6):497-510

Rebecca Frantz, Northern Arizona University; Sara G. Hansen, Georgia State University; Buket Erturk, Wendy Machalicek, and Jane Squires, University of Oregon; and Tracy J. Raulston, University of Pennysylvania.

Paraeducators are ideal candidates for delivering communication interventions to children with developmental disabilities and delays (DD) because they spend a significant amount of time with these children. However, professional development is often inadequate and limited research supports best practices. Additionally, paraeducators work with multiple children with varying skill levels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.6.497DOI Listing
November 2019

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Nov;124(6):585-586

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.6.585DOI Listing
November 2019

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Nov;124(6):583-584

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November 2019

Task and Participant Variables Predict Communication Complexity Scale (CCS) Scores: Closer Examination of the CCS.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 11;124(6):483-496

Kandace K. Fleming, Research Design and Analysis Unit, The University of Kansas, The Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies, Lawrence; and Nancy C. Brady, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences & Disorders, The University of Kansas, The Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies, Lawrence.

Communication Complexity Scale (CCS) scores for 269 minimally verbal participants were examined to determine if communicator behavior and task and communicator characteristics were related to scores in a manner consistent with theoretical and research evidence expectations. Each participant completed an interactive assessment with 6 joint attention tasks and 6 behavior regulation tasks. Caregivers completed the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales II. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.6.483DOI Listing
November 2019

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Sep;124(5):478-479

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September 2019

Positive Emotional Support in Premutation Carrier Mothers of Adolescents and Adults With Fragile X Syndrome: Gene by Environment Interactions.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 09;124(5):411-426

Sigan L. Hartley, Waisman Center and School of Human Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Leann S. DaWalt, Jinkuk Hong, Jan S. Greenberg, and Marsha R. Mailick, Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

We examined the benefit of emotional support on daily health in premutation carrier mothers of adolescents and adults with fragile X syndrome ( = 114), and whether this benefit was moderated by the mother's genetic status ( CGG repeat length). In an 8-day daily diary, maternal daily health was assessed subjectively through self-reported number of physical health symptoms and physiologically via cortisol awakening response. Multilevel lagged-day models indicated that premutation carrier mothers with midrange CGG repeats derived less health benefit from a day with high positive emotional support than those with lower or higher numbers of repeats within the premutation range. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6948144PMC
September 2019

Brief Report: Calculation and Convergent and Divergent Validity of a New ADOS-2 Expressive Language Score.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 09;124(5):438-449

Micah O. Mazurek, Department of Human Services, University of Virginia; Mary Baker-Ericzén, Child and Adolescent Services Research Center, Rady Children's Hospital; and Stephen M. Kanne, Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders, University of Missouri.

Despite the importance of expressive language for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), expressive language assessments are not consistently included in ASD research and many studies do not adequately describe participants' verbal abilities. A valid and efficient measure of expressive language would facilitate consistent reporting across ASD research studies and provide data for additional analyses. The current study developed a new Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS-2) expressive language score and examined convergent and divergent validity in a large, well-defined sample of children with ASD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.5.438DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6800067PMC
September 2019

Trend Change in the Intellectual Disability Nursing Home Census From 1977 to 2004.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 09;124(5):427-437

Scott D. Landes, Syracuse University, New York and Nikita Lillaney, University of North Florida, Jacksonville.

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) of 1987 was expected to reduce inappropriate residential placements of persons with intellectual disability (ID) in nursing homes. Utilizing the nationally representative 1977, 1985, 1995, and 2004 National Nursing Home Surveys (NNHS), we estimate trend change in the ID nursing home census pre- and post-OBRA. We find a marked decrease in number and percentage, and a shift in the age distribution of the ID nursing home census, most pronounced between 1985 and 1995. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.5.427DOI Listing
September 2019
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Self-Reported Guilt Among Adult Siblings of People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 09;124(5):470-477

Carolyn M. Shivers, Virginia Tech.

As more siblings become responsible for their aging brothers and sisters with intellectual and developmental disabilities, it becomes increasingly important to understand these siblings' emotional needs, including potential negative emotions such as guilt. This study examined the presence and correlates of self-reported guilt among 1,021 adult siblings of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Respondents completed the Adult Sibling Questionnaire, a national survey examining characteristics of adult health, depression, and feelings of guilt. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.5.470DOI Listing
September 2019
2 Reads

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Sep;124(5):480-481

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.5.480DOI Listing
September 2019

Behavioral Treatment of Self-Injury: 2001 to 2016.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 09;124(5):450-469

Lesley A. Shawler, Samantha R. Russo, and Jennifer L. Hilton, Endicott College; SungWoo Kahng, Rutgers University; Cheryl J. Davis, The Sage Colleges; and Michael F. Dorsey, Amego, Inc.

Individuals diagnosed with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) frequently exhibit self-injurious behavior (SIB). Previous research has examined the published literature on behavioral treatments of SIB from 1964-2000. Results suggested that these treatments were highly efficacious at decreasing SIB, particularly when based on the results of a functional assessment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.5.450DOI Listing
September 2019

Practitioner Implementation of Communication Intervention With Students With Complex Communication Needs.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 09;124(5):395-410

Natalie R. Andzik, Northern Illinois University; and Helen I. Cannella-Malone, The Ohio State University.

This study evaluated the effects of a pyramidal training approach that used an expert trainer who taught teachers how to train their paraeducators. Three special education teachers were taught to train four paraeducators to provide students with intellectual and developmental disabilities opportunities to initiate (OTI). A multiple baseline design across participants was used to evaluate the rate and fidelity that paraeducators provided OTI and least to most prompting strategies with students. Read More

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September 2019

A Novel Framework to Measure Executive Function in Down Syndrome With Applications for Early Clinical Diagnosis of Dementia.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 07;124(4):354-373

Elizabeth Smith, University of Bristol and Cardiff University, UK; Craig Hedge, Cardiff University, UK; and Christopher Jarrold, University of Bristol, UK.

Executive function (EF) decline is a consistent early sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD) among adults with Down syndrome (DS), which means that baseline measures of EF for individuals with DS are vital to allow detection of meaningful decline. We developed a framework to extract measures of three core components of EF (memory updating, inhibitory, and temporal components) within one task. Increases in memory load, inhibitory load, and temporal demands led to significant increases in reaction times and significant decreases in accuracy among 18 adults with DS and 18 typically developing matched individuals; thus, the expected effects of all three manipulations were detected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.4.354DOI Listing
July 2019
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Computer Assisted Instruction to Teach Academic Content to Students With Intellectual Disability: A Review of the Literature.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 07;124(4):374-390

Sara Snyder, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA; and Heartley B. Huber, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA.

Special educators are relying more heavily on computer assisted instruction (CAI) programs to teach academic content to students with intellectual disability (ID) than ever before. Research in this area is growing; however, no formal review of the literature has been conducted to examine the efficacy of using CAI to teach academic content to students with ID. This review explores the nature of academic content taught to students with ID using CAI, the CAI programs used to provide instruction, research methodology, and student learning outcomes associated with CAI. Read More

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July 2019
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Resúmenes al Español.

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Jul;124(4):393-394

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Examining the Impact of Respondent-Level Factors on Scores on the .

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 07;124(4):309-323

Mayumi Hagiwara, Kansas University Center on Developmental Disabilities; Karrie A. Shogren, Director, Kansas University Center on Developmental Disabilities, Lawrence; and Leslie A. Shaw, Kansas University Center on Developmental Disabilities.

This secondary analysis examined the impact of respondent-level factors on scores on the (SIS-C) for children and youth with intellectual disability to determine if there were any significant differences in the SIS-C scores by different respondent pairs when considering children's age, intellectual functioning level, and adaptive behavior level. Results indicated whenever a pair of respondents included a teacher or a paraprofessional, the support needs scores were lower than when the pair included a family member. Moreover, there was a significant interaction effect across respondent pairing, child age, and child intellectual functioning levels as well as across respondent pairing, child age, and child adaptive behavior levels. Read More

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July 2019
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Modeling the Relations Among Sustained Attention, Short-Term Memory, and Language in Down Syndrome.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 07;124(4):293-308

Gayle G. Faught, University of South Carolina Aiken; and Frances A. Conners, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa.

Sustained attention (SA) and short-term memory (STM) contribute to language function in Down syndrome (DS). We proposed models in which relations of SA to language in DS are mediated by STM. Thirty-seven youth with DS aged 10-22 years ( = 15. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.4.293DOI Listing
July 2019
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Résumés en Français.

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Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Jul;124(4):391-392

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A Cross-Syndrome Comparison of Sleep-Dependent Learning on a Cognitive Procedural Task.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 07;124(4):339-353

Anna Joyce, Centre for Innovative Research Across the Life Course, Coventry University, England; Catherine M. Hill, Clinical Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, England; Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Deceased 19th December 2016; and Dagmara Dimitriou, Lifespan Learning and Sleep Laboratory, University College London (UCL), Institute of Education, London, England.

Sleep plays a key role in the consolidation of newly acquired information and skills into long term memory. Children with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS) frequently experience sleep problems, abnormal sleep architecture, and difficulties with learning; thus, we predicted that children from these clinical populations would demonstrate impairments in sleep-dependent memory consolidation relative to children with typical development (TD) on a cognitive procedural task: The Tower of Hanoi. Children with DS ( = 17), WS ( = 22) and TD ( = 34) completed the Tower of Hanoi task. Read More

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July 2019
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Auditory-Perceptual Speech Features in Children With Down Syndrome.

Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 07;124(4):324-338

Harrison N. Jones, Kelly D. Crisp, and Maragatha Kuchibhatla, Duke University; Leslie Mahler, University of Rhode Island; and Thomas Risoli Jr., Carlee W. Jones, and Priya Kishnani, Duke University.

Speech disorders occur commonly in individuals with Down syndrome (DS), although data regarding the auditory-perceptual speech features are limited. This descriptive study assessed 47 perceptual speech features during connected speech samples in 26 children with DS. The most severely affected speech features were: naturalness, imprecise consonants, hyponasality, speech rate, inappropriate silences, irregular vowels, prolonged intervals, overall loudness level, pitch level, aberrant oropharyngeal resonance, hoarse voice, reduced stress, and prolonged phonemes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.4.324DOI Listing
July 2019
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