32,877 results match your criteria American journal of public health[Journal]


Lessons From History: What Can We Learn From 300 Years of Pandemic Flu That Could Inform the Response to COVID-19?

Authors:
José Esparza

Am J Public Health 2020 08;110(8):1160-1161

José Esparza is with the Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, and the Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305761DOI Listing

The COVID-19 Pandemic: A Watershed Moment to Strengthen Food Security Across the US Food System.

Am J Public Health 2020 08;110(8):1133-1134

Carmen Byker Shanks is with the Department of Health and Human Development, Food and Health Lab, Montana State University, Bozeman. Melanie D. Hingle is with the Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson. Courtney A. Parks and Amy L. Yaroch are with the Gretchen Swanson Center for Nutrition, Omaha, NE.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305760DOI Listing

Time to Protect Our Children From Liquid Laundry Detergent Packets.

Authors:
Gary A Smith

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):1119-1120

Gary A. Smith is with the Center for Injury Research and Policy, Abigail Wexner Research Institute, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH; the Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus; and the Child Injury Prevention Alliance, Columbus, OH.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305787DOI Listing

Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Change Efforts are Unethical and Harmful.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):1113-1114

Jessica N. Fish is with the Department of Family Science and the Prevention Research Center, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park. Stephen T. Russell is with the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, University of Texas, Austin.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305765DOI Listing

COVID-19 Among African Americans: From Preliminary Epidemiological Surveillance Data to Public Health Action.

Am J Public Health 2020 08;110(8):1157-1159

Steven S. Coughlin, Justin Xavier Moore, and Varghese George are with the Department of Population Health Sciences, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta. Steven S. Coughlin, Justin Xavier Moore, and J. Aaron Johnson are with the Institute of Public and Preventive Health, Augusta University. Joseph Hobbs is with the Department of Family Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305764DOI Listing

Free Vaccinations for All Is, Morally and Economically, the Right Way to Prepare for Pandemic and Seasonal Respiratory Infections.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):1143-1144

The authors are with the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305786DOI Listing

Ethical Pandemic Control Through the Public Health Code of Ethics.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):1171-1172

James C. Thomas is with the Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, and the Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Nabarun Dasgupta is with the Injury Prevention Research Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305785DOI Listing

Structural Origin of Health Determinants: Implications for Research and Policy.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):1173-1174

Heather K. Scott-Marshall is with the Social & Behavioural Sciences Division, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305763DOI Listing

Broadband Internet Access Is a Social Determinant of Health!

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):1123-1125

Natalie C. Benda and Jessica S. Ancker are with the Department of Population Health Sciences, Division of Health Informatics, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY. Tiffany C. Veinot is with the School of Information and the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Cynthia J. Sieck is with the Department of Family Medicine and the Center for the Advancement of Team Science, Analytics, and Systems Thinking in Health Services and Implementation Science Research, College of Medicine, the Ohio State University, Columbus.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305784DOI Listing

State Policymaking and Prescription Drug-Monitoring Programs: A Look Ahead.

Authors:
Michael R Fraser

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):1117-1118

Michael R. Fraser is chief executive officer at the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials and is affiliate faculty in the Departments of Community Health and Health Administration and Policy, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305762DOI Listing

ERRATUM.

Authors:

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):e1

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2019.305528eDOI Listing

The Personal Protective Equipment Crisis: To Save or to Build.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):1165-1166

Nicole M. Thomasian, Roja Garimella, and Eli Y. Adashi are with the Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305756DOI Listing

Ohio as a Window Into Recent US Trends on Abortion Access and Restrictions.

Authors:
Elizabeth Nash

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):1115-1116

Elizabeth Nash is with the Guttmacher Institute, Washington, DC.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305799DOI Listing

On Being a Former Student Editor in the Midst of a Pandemic.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):1109

Kent State University, College of Public Health, Kent, OH.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305737DOI Listing

Climate Silence on the Web Sites of US Health Departments.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):1121-1122

Edward Maibach and Connie Roser-Renouf are with the Center for Climate Change Communication, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA. Howard Frumkin is with the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305791DOI Listing

Strategies Mitigating the Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Incarcerated Populations.

Am J Public Health 2020 08;110(8):1135-1136

Lauren K. Robinson, Reuben Heyman-Kantor, and Cara Angelotta are with the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305754DOI Listing

AJPH Global News.

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Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):1110

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305775DOI Listing

COVID-19, China, the World Health Organization, and the Limits of International Health Diplomacy.

Am J Public Health 2020 08;110(8):1149-1151

Theodore M. Brown is with the Department of History and Public Health Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY. Susan Ladwig is with the Department of Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305796DOI Listing

COVID-19: Health as a Common Good.

Authors:
Alfredo Morabia

Am J Public Health 2020 08;110(8):1111-1112

Alfredo Morabia is AJPH editor in chief and is with the Barry Commoner Center for Health and the Environment, Queens College, City University of New York, Flushing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305802DOI Listing

The Firearm Industry as a Commercial Determinant of Health.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):1182-1183

The authors are with the Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Nason Maani is also with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305788DOI Listing

Arabs, Whiteness, and Health Disparities: The Need for Critical Race Theory and Data.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug;110(8):e2-e3

The authors are with The Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice and Health, Department of Community Health Sciences, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305749DOI Listing

George Floyd and Our Collective Moral Injury.

Authors:
Oxiris Barbot

Am J Public Health 2020 Jul 2:e1. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Queens, NY.

When I think of the torture and murder of George Floyd at the knee of a White police officer, I feel morally wounded. (. Published online ahead of print July 2, 2020: e1-e1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305850DOI Listing

Goal-Aligned, Epidemic Intelligence for the Public Health Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Am J Public Health 2020 08 2;110(8):1154-1156. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Denis Nash is with the Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health, City University of New York (CUNY) and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, New York, NY. Elvin Geng is with the Center for Implementation and Dissemination, Institute for Public Health, and the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305794DOI Listing

Public Health and Privacy in the Pandemic.

Authors:
Mark A Rothstein

Am J Public Health 2020 Jul 2:e1-e2. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Mark A. Rothstein is with the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy and Law, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY.

The fundamental ethical, legal, and policy challenge of public health is balancing public and individual interests, often conceptualized as the conflict between utilitarianism and libertarianism. During the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic, this struggle has involved the imposition of extraordinary levels of government-mandated social distancing to protect public health followed by impassioned efforts to lessen these constraints in the interests of individual liberty and economic renewal. (. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305849DOI Listing

Policy Recommendations to Address High Risk of COVID-19 Among Immigrants.

Am J Public Health 2020 08 25;110(8):1137-1139. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

Brent A. Langellier is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Management and Policy, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305792DOI Listing

Impact of The Community Eligibility Provision of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act on Student Nutrition, Behavior, and Academic Outcomes: 2011-2019.

Am J Public Health 2020 Jun 25:e1-e6. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

Amelie A. Hecht and Keshia M. Pollack Porter are with the Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. Lindsey Turner is with the College of Education, Boise State University, Boise, ID.

The Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) allows high-poverty schools participating in US Department of Agriculture meal programs to offer universal free breakfast and lunch. Authorized as part of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, CEP became available to eligible schools nationwide in 2014.Emerging evidence suggests that schools that provide universal free meals experience positive impacts on student nutrition, behavior, and academic performance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305743DOI Listing

Impact of the Voluntary Safety Standard for Liquid Laundry Packets on Child Injuries Treated in US Hospital Emergency Departments, 2012-2018.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug 18;110(8):1242-1247. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Stephen J. Hanway is with the Directorate for Epidemiology, US Consumer Product Safety Commission, Bethesda, MD. Gregory B. Rodgers is with the Directorate for Economic Analysis, US Consumer Product Safety Commission.

To evaluate the effect of the voluntary safety standard for liquid laundry packets on the rate of injury involving children younger than 5 years in the United States. Semiannual national estimates of child injuries involving liquid laundry packets treated in US hospital emergency departments were developed for the July 2012 through December 2018 study period. We used a negative binomial regression model to estimate the effect of the voluntary standard on the injury rate following the standard's publication at the end of 2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305650DOI Listing

No Detectable Surge in SARS-CoV-2 Transmission Attributable to the April 7, 2020 Wisconsin Election.

Am J Public Health 2020 08 18;110(8):1169-1170. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Kathy Leung and Joseph T. Wu are with the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Control, School of Public Health, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administration Region, China. Kuang Xu and Lawrence M. Wein are with the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305770DOI Listing

Community Wound Care Program Within a Syringe Exchange Program: Chicago, 2018-2019.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug 18;110(8):1211-1213. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

The authors are with the University of Illinois at Chicago. Michael Huyck is with the Department of Health Systems Science, College of Nursing; Stockton Mayer is with the College of Medicine and Department of Infectious Disease; Sarah Messmer is with the College of Medicine and Department of Pediatrics; and Charles Yingling is with the College of Nursing and Department of Health Systems Science.

People who inject drugs (PWID) are at increased risk for developing wounds in addition to skin and soft tissue infections. The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, College of Medicine, and School of Public Health collaborated to establish a medical clinic serving PWID attending a Chicago syringe exchange program. A wound care program was implemented to improve clinicians' competence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305681DOI Listing

Changes to Contraceptive Method Use at Title X Clinics Following Delaware Contraceptive Access Now, 2008-2017.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug 18;110(8):1214-1220. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Michel Boudreaux, Liyang Xie, Yoon Sun Choi, and Dylan Habeeb Roby are with the Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Maryland, College Park. Michael S. Rendall is with the Department of Sociology and is the director of the Maryland Population Research Center, University of Maryland, College Park.

To measure changes in the contraceptive methods used by Title X clients after implementation of Delaware Contraceptive Access Now, a public-private initiative that aims to increase access to contraceptives, particularly long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs). Using administrative data from the 2008-2017 Family Planning Annual Reports and a difference-in-differences design, we compared changes in contraceptive method use among adult female Title X family planning clients in Delaware with changes in a set of comparison states. We considered permanent methods, LARCs, moderately effective methods, less effective methods, and no method use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305666DOI Listing

The Mortality Effects of Reduced Medicaid Coverage Among International Migrants in Hawaii: 2012-2018.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug 18;110(8):1205-1207. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Teresa Molina, Tetine Sentell, and Timothy J. Halliday are with the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu. Randall Q. Akee is with University of California, Los Angeles. Alvin Onaka and Brian Horiuchi are with the Department of Health, State of Hawaii, Honolulu.

To study the impact on mortality in Hawaii from the revoked state Medicaid program coverage in March 2015 for most Compact of Free Association (COFA) migrants who were nonblind, nondisabled, and nonpregnant. We computed quarterly crude mortality rates for COFA migrants, Whites, and Japanese Americans from March 2012 to November 2018. We employed a difference-in-difference research design to estimate the impact of the Medicaid expiration on log mortality rates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305687DOI Listing

Personal Protective Equipment for COVID-19: Distributed Fabrication and Additive Manufacturing.

Am J Public Health 2020 08 18;110(8):1162-1164. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Michael S. Sinha, Florence T. Bourgeois, and Peter K. Sorger are with the Harvard-MIT Center for Regulatory Science, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Michael S. Sinha is also with the Program on Regulation, Therapeutics, and Law, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston. Florence T. Bourgeois is also with the Computational Health Informatics Program, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston. Peter K. Sorger is also with the Harvard Program in Therapeutic Science, Harvard Medical School.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305753DOI Listing

Work Requirements and Medicaid Disenrollment in Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, and Texas, 2018.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug 18;110(8):1208-1210. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Lucy Chen is with the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the Harvard Business School, Boston, MA. Benjamin D. Sommers is with the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.

To identify risk factors for Medicaid disenrollment after the implementation of Arkansas's work requirements. Using a 2018 telephone survey of 1208 low-income adults aged 30 to 49 years in Arkansas (expansion state with work requirements implemented in June 2018), Kentucky (expansion state with proposed work requirements blocked by courts), Louisiana (expansion state without work requirements), and Texas (nonexpansion state), we assessed Medicaid disenrollment rates among the age group targeted by Arkansas's policy. The Medicaid disenrollment rate was highest in Texas (12. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305697DOI Listing

A History of Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs in the United States: Political Appeal and Public Health Efficacy.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug 18;110(8):1191-1197. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

A. Jay Holmgren is with the Harvard Business School, Harvard University, Boston, MA. Alyssa Botelho is with the Medical Scientist Training Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, and the Department of the History of Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. Allan M. Brandt is with the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, and the Department of the History of Science, Harvard University, Cambridge.

Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) have become a widely embraced policy to address the US opioid crisis. Despite mixed scientific evidence on their effectiveness at improving health and reducing overdose deaths, 49 states and Washington, DC have adopted PDMPs, and they have received strong bipartisan legislative support. This article explores the history of PDMPs, tracking their evolution from paper-based administrative databases in the early 1900s to modern-day electronic systems that intervene at the point of care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305696DOI Listing

Inequalities and Deteriorations in Cardiovascular Health in Premenopausal US Women, 1990-2016.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug 18;110(8):1175-1181. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Adrienne O'Neil and Josephine D. Russell are with Heart and Mind Research, iMPACT Institute, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia. Adrienne O'Neil is also with Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria. Kelly Thompson and Robyn Norton are with Global Women's Health, The George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales, Newtown, New South Wales, Australia. Robyn Norton is also with University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates in the United States have declined by up to two thirds in recent decades. Closer examination of these trends reveals substantial inequities in the distribution of mortality benefits. It is worrying that the uneven distribution of CHD that exists from lowest to highest social class-the social gradient-has become more pronounced in the United States since 1990 and is most pronounced for women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305702DOI Listing

From "Infodemics" to Health Promotion: A Novel Framework for the Role of Social Media in Public Health.

Am J Public Health 2020 Jun 18:e1-e4. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Dean Schillinger is with the Health Communications Research Program, Center for Vulnerable Populations, San Francisco General Hospital, University of California, San Francisco. Deepti Chittamuru and A. Susana Ramírez are with the Department of Public Health, School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts, University of California, Merced.

Despite the ubiquity of health-related communications via social media, no consensus has emerged on whether this medium, on balance, jeopardizes or promotes public health. During the COVID-19 pandemic, social media has been described as the source of a toxic "infodemic" or a valuable tool for public health. No conceptual model exists for examining the roles that social media can play with respect to population health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305746DOI Listing

Dissemination of Information About Climate Change by State and Local Public Health Departments: United States, 2019-2020.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug 18;110(8):1184-1190. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Karen Albright is with the Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, and the Denver-Seattle Center of Innovation, Department of Veterans Affairs, Aurora. Pari Shah is with the Graduate School of Social Work, University of Denver, Denver, CO. Melodie Santodomingo is with the Departments of Epidemiology and Community & Behavioral Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora. Jean Scandlyn is with the Department of Health and Behavioral Sciences and the Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Denver.

To determine if and how state and local public health departments present information about climate change on their Web sites, their most public-facing platform. We collected data from every functioning state (n = 50), county (n = 2090), and city (n = 585) public health department Web site in the United States in 2019 and 2020. We analyzed data for presence and type of climate-related content and to determine whether there existed clear ways to find climate change information. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305723DOI Listing

The COVID-19 Pandemic and Wildfire Smoke: Potentially Concomitant Disasters.

Am J Public Health 2020 08 18;110(8):1140-1142. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Sarah B. Henderson is with Environmental Health Services, British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, BC, and the School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305744DOI Listing

Mandatory Bicycle Helmet Laws in the United States: Origins, Context, and Controversies.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug 18;110(8):1198-1204. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Kathleen Bachynski is with the Public Health Program at Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA. Alison Bateman-House is with the Division of Medical Ethics and the Department of Population Health at New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York, NY.

This article examines the origins and context of mandatory bicycle helmet laws in the United States. Localities began to enact such laws in the early 1990s, having experimented with helmet laws for motorcycles previously. As cycling became increasingly popular in the 1970s and 1980s because of a variety of historical trends, from improved cycle technology to growing environmental consciousness, cycling-related injuries also increased. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305718DOI Listing

Nonrelocatable Occupations at Increased Risk During Pandemics: United States, 2018.

Authors:
Marissa G Baker

Am J Public Health 2020 08 18;110(8):1126-1132. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Marissa G. Baker is with the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle.

To characterize which occupations in the United States could likely work from home during a pandemic such as COVID-19. I merged 2018 US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) national employment and wage data with measures ranking the importance of computer use at work and the importance of working with or performing for the public from the BLS O*NET survey. Approximately 25% (35. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305738DOI Listing

Work Environment Factors and Prevention of Opioid-Related Deaths.

Am J Public Health 2020 Aug 18;110(8):1235-1241. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

William S. Shaw is with the Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington. Cora Roelofs and Laura Punnett are with the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Francis College of Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell.

Opioid use disorder (OUD) and opioid overdose deaths (OODs) are prevalent among US workers, but work-related factors have not received adequate attention as either risk factors or opportunities for OOD prevention. Higher prevalence of OOD in those with heavy physical jobs, more precarious work, and limited health care benefits suggest work environment and organizational factors may predispose workers to the development of OUD.Organizational policies that reduce ergonomic risk factors, respond effectively to employee health and safety concerns, provide access to nonpharmacologic pain management, and encourage early substance use treatment are important opportunities to improve outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305716DOI Listing

The COVID-19 Pandemic: A View From Vietnam.

Am J Public Health 2020 08 28;110(8):1152-1153. Epub 2020 May 28.

Maurizio Trevisan and Linh Cu Le are with the College of Health Sciences, VinUniversity, Hanoi, Vietnam. Anh Vu Le is with the Vietnam Public Health Association, Hanoi, Vietnam.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305751DOI Listing

We're Not All in This Together: On COVID-19, Intersectionality, and Structural Inequality.

Authors:
Lisa Bowleg

Am J Public Health 2020 07 28;110(7):917. Epub 2020 May 28.

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences Intersectionality Training Institute The George Washington University Washington, DC.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305766DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7287552PMC

The Sweetened Beverage Tax in Cook County, Illinois: Lessons From a Failed Effort.

Am J Public Health 2020 Jul 21;110(7):1009-1016. Epub 2020 May 21.

Jamie F. Chriqui and Lisa M. Powell are with the Division of Health Policy and Administration, School of Public Health, and the Health Policy Center, Institute for Health Research and Policy (IHRP), University of Illinois at Chicago. At the time of this study, Christina N. Sansone was a visiting research specialist at IHRP.

To describe the public health and policy lessons learned from the failure of the Cook County, Illinois, Sweetened Beverage Tax (SBT). This retrospective, mixed-methods, qualitative study involved key informant (KI) and discussion group interviews and document analysis including news media, court documents, testimony, letters, and press releases. Two coders used Atlas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305640DOI Listing

Affordable, Social, and Substandard Housing and Mortality: The EPIPorto Cohort Study, 1999-2019.

Am J Public Health 2020 Jul 21;110(7):1060-1067. Epub 2020 May 21.

The authors are with EPIUnit-Instituto de Saúde Pública and Departamento de Ciências da Saúde Pública e Forenses e Educação Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.

To examine the association between residence in different housing typologies and all-cause and cause-specific mortality, and to compare with the 25 × 25 risk factors defined by the World Health Organization. We used data from EPIPorto cohort (Porto, Portugal; n = 2485). We georeferenced and matched participants to a housing type-conventional, affordable, social, or substandard housing (locally called ). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305661DOI Listing

Enrollment Length, Service Category, and HIV Health Outcomes Among Low-Income HIV-Positive Persons Newly Enrolled in a Housing Program, New York City, 2014-2017.

Am J Public Health 2020 Jul 21;110(7):1068-1075. Epub 2020 May 21.

At the time of the analysis, all authors were with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Long Island City, NY.

To evaluate the impact of duration and service category on HIV health outcomes among low-income adults living with HIV and enrolled in a housing program in 2014 to 2017. We estimated relative risk of engagement in care, viral suppression, and CD4 improvement for 561 consumers at first and second year after enrollment to matched controls through the New York City HIV surveillance registry, by enrollment length (enrolled for more than 1 year or not) and service category (housing placement assistance [HPA], supportive permanent housing [SPH], and rental assistance [REN]). The SPH and REN consumers were enrolled longer and received more services, compared with HPA consumers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305660DOI Listing

Federal, State, and Local Nutrition Policies for Cancer Prevention: Perceived Impact and Feasibility, United States, 2018.

Am J Public Health 2020 Jul 21;110(7):1006-1008. Epub 2020 May 21.

Lauren Lizewski, Grace Flaherty, Parke Wilde, Dariush Mozaffarian, and Fang Fang Zhang are with the Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Boston, MA. Ross Brownson is with the Prevention Research Center in St. Louis, Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO. Claire Wang is with the New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY. Melissa Maitin-Shepard is an independent consultant, Alexandria, VA. Yan Li is with the Department of Population Health Science and Policy, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY.

To assess stakeholder perceptions of the impact and feasibility of 21 national, state, and local nutrition policies for cancer prevention across 5 domains in the United States. We conducted an online survey from October through December 2018. Participants were invited to take the survey via direct e-mail contact or an organizational e-newsletter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305644DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7287515PMC
July 2020
4.552 Impact Factor

Policy Lessons From Early Reactions to the COVID-19 Virus in China.

Am J Public Health 2020 08 21;110(8):1145-1148. Epub 2020 May 21.

The authors are with the Department of Health Policy and Management, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA.

The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the COVID-19 virus outbreak to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on January 30, 2020. Although the Chinese central government implemented significant measures to control the epidemic from January 20 within China, the crisis had already escalated dramatically.Between December 1, 2019, and January 20, 2020, a total of 51 days passed before the Chinese central government took full control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305732DOI Listing

Perinatal Health Outcomes Following a Community Health Worker-Supported Home-Visiting Program in Rochester, New York, 2015-2018.

Am J Public Health 2020 Jul 21;110(7):1031-1033. Epub 2020 May 21.

Zhi Pan, Peter Veazie, and Ann Dozier are with the Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. Mardy Sandler is with the Division of Social Work, University of Rochester Medical Center. Melissa Molongo, Tiffany Pulcino, Wendy Parisi, and Katherine Eisenberg are with the Safety Net and Program Support Office, University of Rochester Medical Center.

We evaluated the effectiveness of a community health worker-supported home visitor program on perinatal outcomes of 455 at-risk pregnant women with program data merged with electronic medical records from July 2015 through October 2017 in Rochester, New York. Program participants had fewer adverse outcomes than did nonparticipants, including lower rates of preterm birth (12% vs 20%; χ,  = .05) and low birth weight (14% vs 22%; χ,  = . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305655DOI Listing