2,790 results match your criteria American journal of psychotherapy[Journal]


Resuming Publication of an Established Journal, Part 4.

Am J Psychother 2018 Dec;71(4):121

American Psychiatric Association Publishing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.71401DOI Listing
December 2018
12 Reads

Metacognitive Reflection and Insight Therapy (MERIT) Among People With Schizophrenia: Lessons From Two Case Studies.

Am J Psychother 2018 Nov 26:appipsychotherapy20180037. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Department of Psychology, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel (Arnon-Ribenfeld, Bloom, Atzil-Slonim, Peri, Hasson-Ohayon); Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (de Jong).

People with schizophrenia spectrum disorder face a major challenge in the ability to reflect on their own and others' mental activities and about specific psychological problems in their lives. These deficits are associated with increased symptoms and lower functioning. Specific interventions have been designed to enhance these abilities, one of which is metacognitive reflection and insight therapy (MERIT). Read More

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November 2018
5 Reads

Metacognitive Interpersonal Therapy for Treating Persecutory Delusions in Schizophrenia.

Am J Psychother 2018 Nov 21:appipsychotherapy20180039. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Center for Metacognitive Interpersonal Therapy, Rome (Salvatore, Buonocore, Ottavi, Popolo, Dimaggio); Humanitas, School of Psychotherapy, Rome (Salvatore, Popolo); Istituto A. T. Beck, School of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Rome (Ottavi, Dimaggio).

A persecutory delusion (PD) is a person's false belief that others are focusing their attention on him or her with malevolent intentions, which often results in intense anxiety and significant disruption of daily life. PDs are common in schizophrenia, and many patients with schizophrenia do not respond well to current pharmacological treatments. Therefore, effective psychological treatments are needed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180039DOI Listing
November 2018
10 Reads

Metacognitive Reflection and Insight Therapy (MERIT) for Persons With a Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder and Interpersonal Trauma.

Am J Psychother 2018 Nov 21:appipsychotherapy20180031. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Department of Psychology, Chillicothe VA Medical Center, Chillicothe, Ohio (Hillis, Bidlack); Department of Psychology, Louisville VA Medical Center, Louisville (Macobin).

Schizophrenia often involves a loss of metacognitive capacity, the ability to form complex and integrated representations of self and others. Independent of symptoms and neurocognition, deficits in synthetic metacognition are related to difficulties engaging in goal-directed activities in social and vocational settings. Against this backdrop, the authors provide a case report of the effects of metacognitive reflection and insight therapy (MERIT) provided over the course of seven months to assist a client with persistent schizophrenia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180031DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Risk Management with Clients Who Stalk, Threaten, and Harass Mental Health Professionals.

Am J Psychother 2018 Nov;71(3):110-120

School of Psychological Sciences, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN.

Although most psychologists will at some point be confronted with a client who engages in stalking, threatening, or harassing behavior (STHB), few feel prepared to manage these situations. In this article, the results of a survey of 112 psychologists who endorsed experiencing STHB are reported. Psychologists were asked about their perceptions of client motivations and personality pathology, frequency of use of 18 risk management responses, and perceived effectiveness of these responses. Read More

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November 2018
2 Reads

Resuming Publication of an Established Journal, Part 3.

Am J Psychother 2018 Nov;71(3):87

American Psychiatric Association Publishing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.710301DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Metacognitive Reflection and Insight Therapy for Schizophrenia: Case Study of a Patient With a Co-Occurring Substance Use Disorder.

Am J Psychother 2018 Nov 7:appipsychotherapy20180038. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

Department of Psychiatry, Kaiser Permanente, Redwood City, California (James); Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (Leonhardt); Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis (Buck).

Decrements in metacognitive functioning, or the ability to form complex and integrated representations of oneself and others, have been identified as a core feature of schizophrenia. These deficits have been observed to be largely independent of the severity of psychopathology and neurocognitive functioning and are linked to poor outcomes for those with the disorder. This study is a case illustration of the efficacy of metacognitive reflection and insight therapy (MERIT) in increasing the metacognitive capacity of an individual diagnosed as having co-occurring schizophrenia and a substance use disorder during three years of individual therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180038DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

Recovery in First-Episode Psychosis: A Case Study of Metacognitive Reflection and Insight Therapy (MERIT).

Am J Psychother 2018 Nov 7:appipsychotherapy20180032. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

Prevention and Recovery Center, Eskenazi Health/Midtown Community Mental Health, Indianapolis (Leonhardt, Ratliff, Vohs); Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (Leonhardt, Vohs).

Despite historically pessimistic views from both the professional community and lay public, research is emerging that recovery from psychosis is possible. Recovery has evolved to include not only a reduction in symptoms and return to functioning, but a sense of agency and connection to meaningful roles in life. The development of a more comprehensive conceptualization of recovery has particular importance in the treatment of first-episode psychosis, because early intervention may avoid some of the prolonged dysfunction that may make recovery difficult. Read More

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November 2018
8 Reads

Metacognitive Reflection and Insight Therapy (MERIT): Application to a Long-Term Therapy Case of Borderline Personality Disorder.

Am J Psychother 2018 Nov 7:appipsychotherapy20180035. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis (Buck and Kukla); San Francisco VA Healthcare Service, San Francisco (Vertinski); Department of Psychology, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis (Kukla).

Impairments in metacognitive capacity-or the processes that enable individuals to access, understand, and integrate their ideas about their own and others' mental states-are a core barrier to recovery for many people with borderline personality disorder. Although therapeutic approaches that focus on metacognitive capacity are emerging, few deal with the concept of recovery at a foundational level. This article describes how a form of metacognitively oriented psychotherapy focused on recovery, metacognitive reflection and insight therapy (MERIT), assisted a patient with borderline personality disorder and initial metacognitive deficits to develop a complex understanding of himself and others and then to use that knowledge to act as an agent in the world and effectively respond to life challenges. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180035DOI Listing
November 2018
10 Reads

Metacognitive Reflection and Insight Therapy for Persons With Severe Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia.

Am J Psychother 2018 Nov 7:appipsychotherapy20180036. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

School of Psychological Science, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis (George); Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Indianapolis (Buck).

Individuals with schizophrenia possess enduring deficits that limit their capacity for interpersonal connection. Negative symptoms of schizophrenia provide additional barriers to interpersonal relatedness in that they include a range of deficits related to an individual's ability to express and experience emotions-basic human capacities that are needed for daily functioning and an acceptable quality of life. Additionally, metacognitive deficits are closely related to the development and maintenance of negative symptoms; previous research has indicated that treatment of negative symptoms should focus on providing interventions that target metacognition. Read More

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http://psychotherapy.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/appi.p
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180036DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

Application of Integrative Metacognitive Psychotherapy for Serious Mental Illness.

Am J Psychother 2018 Oct 10:appipsychotherapy20180033. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Eskenazi Health, Midtown Community Mental Health, Indianapolis (Hamm); Department of Psychiatry, Roudebush Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Indianapolis (Lysaker), and Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (Lysaker).

Recovery for many people with serious mental illness is more than symptom remission or attainment of certain concrete milestones. It can also involve recapturing a previously lost coherent and cohesive sense of self. The authors review several case studies of integrative metacognitive psychotherapy offered to adults with broadly differing clinical presentations. Read More

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October 2018
2 Reads

Humor Associated With Positive Outcomes in Individual Psychotherapy.

Am J Psychother 2018 Sep 12:appipsychotherapy20180021. Epub 2018 Sep 12.

Department of Psychiatry, Hôpital St. Joseph, Liège, Belgium (Panichelli); private practice, Cabinet Bois-le-Comte, Sprimont, Belgium (Panichelli); Université de Liège, Département des Sciences de la Santé Publique, Service de Biostatistique, Liège, Belgium (Albert, Donneau); Université de Liège, Service de Clinique Systémique et Psychopathologie Relationnelle, Liège, Belgium (D'Amore); Hôpital de Jour Universitaire La Clé, Liège, Belgium (Triffaux); Université de Liège, Département des Sciences Cliniques/Psychiatrie et Psychologie Médicale, Liège, Belgium (Ansseau).

Considerable anecdotal evidence points to the usefulness of humor in the therapeutic process, but empirical evidence is lacking. The purpose of this study, conducted in Belgium, was to search for an association between humor and therapy outcomes in a population of 110 adult psychotherapy clients who attended at least 10 therapy sessions. Clients and their therapist evaluated the frequency and intensity of humorous events, as well as therapy effectiveness, therapeutic alliance, perceived hope, and pleasure in participating in therapy sessions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180021DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Relationship of Christian Beliefs to Attitudes Toward People With Mental Illness.

Am J Psychother 2018 Sep 12:appipsychotherapy20180022. Epub 2018 Sep 12.

Department of Psychology, Counseling, and Family Therapy, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA (all authors).

This study assessed the influence of Christian beliefs on attitudes toward people with mental illness. Participants (N=204) provided demographic information and completed the Christian Orthodoxy Scale, the Religious Fundamentalism Scale, and the Attitudes to Mental Illness Questionnaire. Participants read vignettes of a person with a mental illness (schizophrenia), a general medical illness (diabetes), and a control condition (practicing Christian) and rated them on five criteria representing stigmatizing attitudes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180022DOI Listing
September 2018
3 Reads

Resuming Publication of an Established Journal, Part 2.

Am J Psychother 2018 Oct;71(2):50

American Psychiatric Association.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.71201DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

The Supervision Pyramid: A Commonalities-Based Synthesis of Intervention, Relationship, and Person/Personhood.

Authors:
C Edward Watkins

Am J Psychother 2018 Aug 15:appipsychotherapy20180017. Epub 2018 Aug 15.

Dr. Watkins is with the Department of Psychology, University of North Texas, Denton (e-mail: ).

Adapting the therapeutic pyramid to the supervision of psychotherapy, the author presents and describes the supervision pyramid-a simple meta-model of the broad conceptual organizers of the supervisor's contribution to the experience and outcomes of supervision. The supervision pyramid consists of three commonalities: supervisor skills and interventions, the supervisory relationship, and the supervisor's person and personhood. Those three commonalities converge to stimulate supervisee learning and relearning and client improvement and symptom reduction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180017DOI Listing
August 2018
2 Reads

Child and Adolescent Psychoanalysis as Contemporary Psychotherapy: Insights From a Semistructured Interview of Practitioners.

Am J Psychother 2018 Oct 27;71(2):65-69. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

The authors are with the Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Health System, New York City.

In response to an emerging consensus that research is important to maintain and develop the field of child and adolescent psychoanalysis, 20 child and adolescent psychoanalysts underwent a semistructured interview concerning their current practices, background, and professional values. Grounded theory methodology was applied to a section of the narratives to produce shared concepts. A significant difference was found between how child and adolescent psychoanalysts are traditionally characterized and taught and how they currently practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180013DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Recovery and Nonrecovery After Psychotherapy With Transference Interpretation: Two Case Studies.

Am J Psychother 2018 Oct 27;71(2):74-86. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

The authors are with the Department of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

The First Experimental Study of Transference Interpretation (FEST), conducted in Norway, is a dismantling, randomized clinical trial of the long-term effects of transference interpretation (TI). This article examines two case studies of women with poor quality of object relations (QOR), one who was rated as recovered after psychotherapy and one who was rated as not recovered. Both received TI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180014DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Mindfulness-Based Psychotherapy Approaches for First Responders: From Research to Clinical Practice.

Am J Psychother 2018 Oct 27;71(2):55-64. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

Dr. Chopko is with the Department of Sociology, Kent State University at Stark, North Canton, Ohio. Dr. Papazoglou is with the Department of Psychology, Mississauga Campus, University of Toronto, Toronto. Dr. Schwartz is with the School of Counseling, University of Akron, Akron, Ohio.

First responders are psychosocially burdened with work-related stressors that occur frequently during required duties. Related mental health difficulties, such as direct and vicarious trauma, depression, and interpersonal problems often affect first responders' ability to perform effectively, and their personal lives may be disrupted. Mindfulness-based interventions have been shown to directly promote first responders' mental and physical health while providing increased resilience when facing work-related stressors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180015DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Beyond Informed Consent: Talking to Patients About Therapeutic Action.

Am J Psychother 2018 Oct 17;71(2):51-54. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

The authors are with the Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center, New York City.

Psychodynamically oriented psychotherapists are faced with the question of what to say to new patients about the therapy they are beginning. This article reviews historical attitudes about early treatment discussions with patients in psychoanalysis with an emphasis on how these discussions have evolved as informed consent became a standard of care. Approaches to talking to patients about therapeutic action in psychodynamic psychotherapy are discussed, including the development and application of a psychoeducational document that is being used to facilitate these discussions in the outpatient residents' clinic of a large urban academic medical center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180010DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Unconscious Repetition of a Patient's Dynamics on an Inpatient Unit: Treatment Challenges.

Am J Psychother 2018 Oct 17;71(2):70-73. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

Dr. Ma is with Kinark Child and Family Services, Whitby, Ontario, Canada. Dr. Sigman is with the Inpatient Psychiatry Service, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

This article focuses on the unconscious repetition of a patient's dynamics among a multidisciplinary inpatient treatment team. The patient was diagnosed as having bipolar affective illness and borderline personality traits. The prominent borderline traits displayed by the patient during hypomanic episodes evoked a parallel process of the patient's internal conflicts, rendering the team temporarily divided regarding treatment plans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180012DOI Listing
October 2018
23 Reads

Resuming Publication of an Established Journal.

Am J Psychother 2018 Jul;71(1)

American Psychiatric Association.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.71101DOI Listing
July 2018
4 Reads

Reclaiming the Inner Child in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: The Complementary Model of the Personality.

Am J Psychother 2018 Jul 1;71(1):21-27. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Mr. Hestbech is with the Oxford Development Centre Ltd., Witney, United Kingdom, and Brunel Hospital, Rehabilitation Hospital for Neuropsychiatry and Neurobehavioural Disorders, Cygnet Healthcare, Bristol, United Kingdom.

The article explores the psychotherapeutic notion of an inner child in the context of the cognitive model and introduces a twin mode protocol that offers a more user-friendly entry level than usual CBT protocols by conferring meaning and immediacy from the outset. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180008DOI Listing
July 2018
5 Reads

The Rational Unconscious: Implications for Mental Illness and Psychotherapy.

Authors:
Brad Bowins

Am J Psychother 2018 Jul 15;71(1):28-38. Epub 2018 May 15.

Dr. Bowins is with the Centre for Theoretical Research in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Rational and reality-congruent unconscious processes facilitate adaptive functioning and have implications for mental illness and psychotherapy. With this knowledge, psychotherapists can more effectively guide interventions to improve mental health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180003DOI Listing
July 2018
4 Reads

The Uncanny: A Biopsychosocial Perspective.

Authors:
Matthew Merced

Am J Psychother 2018 Jul 15;71(1):39-49. Epub 2018 May 15.

Dr. Merced is in independent practice, La Quinta, California.

A biopsychosocial model provides a framework for a contemporary understanding of paranormal phenomena. From this perspective, paranormal beliefs and experiences are best understood by identifying biological, psychological, and sociocultural explanatory factors. Treatment recommendations are provided. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180004DOI Listing
July 2018
5 Reads

Targeting Safety Behaviors in the Treatment of Anxiety Disorders: A Case Study of False Safety Behavior Elimination Treatment.

Am J Psychother 2018 Jul 7;71(1):9-20. Epub 2018 May 7.

Dr. Korte is with the Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. Dr. Norr and Dr. Schmidt are with the Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee.

This article provides an overview of F-SET, a brief transdiagnostic treatment for anxiety disorders. The article focuses on the use of specific treatment techniques and follows a successful course of treatment using the F-SET protocol. The client's treatment progress is discussed session by session and at midtreatment, posttreatment, and 11-month follow-up. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180001DOI Listing
July 2018
5 Reads

Implications of Attachment Theory and Neuroscience for the Psychotherapeutic Treatment of Obesity and Overeating.

Authors:
Fran Weiss

Am J Psychother 2018 Jul 7;71(1):2-8. Epub 2018 May 7.

Ms. Weiss is with the Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai, New York, and the New York Obesity Nutrition Research Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital in affiliation with Columbia University, New York.

This article examines psychological sequelae underlying dysregulated eating in the overweight and obese patient and proposes a psychotherapy approach informed by classical and modern attachment theory, developmental trauma, and neuroscience to address these structural deficits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.20180002DOI Listing
July 2018
5 Reads

Supervisor Allegiance as a Critical Construct: A Brief Communication.

Am J Psychother 2016 Dec;70(4):439-444

Allegiance, long regarded as a significant variable in psychotherapy and psychotherapy research, has been ignored in the psychotherapy supervision literature. It is our contention that allegiance is similarly significant for psychotherapy supervision. In this brief communication, we define supervisor allegiance, consider its impact on supervision outcome, and highlight its role in the contextual supervision relationship model (a trans-theoretical model of the supervisory relationship). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.4.439DOI Listing
December 2016
8 Reads

"Our Time is Up": A Relational Perspective on the Ending of a Single Psychotherapy Session.

Authors:
Jerome S Gans

Am J Psychother 2016 Dec;70(4):413-427

This paper, written from a relational perspective, examines the final minutes of an individual psychotherapy session, and is organized around the topics of boundary negotiation, unwitting self-disclosures, visual challenges, and countertransference. Attending to session-ending material is important because the separation involved lends heightened emotional intensity to the oftensignificant material that appears in the final minutes. This material often serves as a bridge to the psychotherapeutic work to be taken up in subsequent sessions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.4.413DOI Listing
December 2016
8 Reads

Psychodynamic Intervention in Crisis.

Authors:
Milton Viederman

Am J Psychother 2016 Dec;70(4):393-412

This paper presents a framework for brief, intensive psychotherapeutic intervention for acute distress, manifested by feelings of depression, anxiety or anger, isolation and loneliness, that arise when crises provoke unconscious conflict. This therapy uses a technique to develop a "benevolent transference" for symptom relief and as a groundwork for gaining insight. Interventions to facilitate this process will be illustrated with case illustrations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.4.393DOI Listing
December 2016
8 Reads

Introducing a Clinical Course-Graphing Scale for DSM-5 Mood Disorders.

Am J Psychother 2016 Dec;70(4):383-392

Assessment of clinical course to aid in the diagnosis of patients and to guide treatment planning has gained momentum in recent years. A course-graphing scale for the DSM-5 Mood Disorders is presented to facilitate clinical history-taking and diagnosis of the mood disorders during the screening interview. The scale can be administered in the more traditional historytaking portion of the screening interview. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.4.383DOI Listing
December 2016
9 Reads

Metacognitive Interpersonal Therapy for Personality Disorders Swinging from Emotional Over-Regulation to Dysregulation: A Case Study.

Am J Psychother 2016 Dec;70(4):365-381

Many patients with personality disorders (PD) display emotional inhibition or over-regulation (EOR); others display emotional dysregulation (ED)- heightened sensitivity to emotional stimuli with difficulty toning down arousal. To date, most treatments focus on patients with ED, particularly those with borderline disorders, though some focus on EOR. Patients with complex PD often swing from periods of EOR to ED. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.4.365DOI Listing
December 2016
22 Reads

Practicing Psychoanalysis and Psychodynamic Psychotherapies in Developing Societies.

Am J Psychother 2016;70(3):329-342

University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences (USWR), Razi Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran, Iran.

Vital to the contemporary exercise of psychiatry is the biopsychosocial approach, with psychotherapy as its well-defined, and requisite, constituent. The key objectives of psychoanalysis and other related therapies are the amelioration of symptoms and modification of character by probing the unconscious. But the practice of psychoanalysis and similar insight-oriented techniques is in developing nations is different from developed countries due to cultural and educational reasons, along with a shortage of required facilities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.3.329DOI Listing
January 2017
10 Reads

Can Frontline Clinicians in Public Psychiatry Settings Provide Effective Psychotherapy For Psychosis?

Am J Psychother 2016;70(3):301-328

NYC CBTp, Brooklyn, NY, USA.

This report consists of the personal reflections of seven frontline clinicians who participated in a formal training program for the psychotherapy of psychosis implemented in a large public clinic setting. The training was part of a quality improvement initiative, consisting of 12 hours of didactic presentation followed by 30 hours of weekly peer-group supervision. The clinicians comment on ways of working with patients prior to the training, and how their views and techniques changed as a result of the training. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.3.301DOI Listing
January 2017
14 Reads

The Cardiac Rhythm of the Unconscious in a Case of Panic Disorder.

Am J Psychother 2016;70(3):277-300

University of Ottawa, Department of Psychiatry, Institut de Recherche de l'Hôpital Montfort, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

The field of psychodynamic psychotherapy would benefit from a comprehensive model that integrates its constructs with neurobiology. Research on the autonomic nervous system activity during the psychotherapeutic process is necessary because it is key in affective experiences and defensive behavior. The current case study reports physiological findings on heart rate dynamics in a patient suffering from panic disorder during two therapeutic sessions in which we used Davanloo's Intensive Short-term Dynamic Psychotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.3.277DOI Listing
January 2017
12 Reads

A Four-Component Model of Sexual Orientation & Its Application to Psychotherapy.

Authors:
Brad Bowins

Am J Psychother 2016;70(3):251-276

Centre for Theoretical Research in Psychiatry & Clinical Psychology.

Distress related to sexual orientation is a common focus in psychotherapy. In some instances the distress is external in nature as with persecution, and in others it is internal as with self-acceptance issues. Complicating matters, sexual orientation is a very complex topic producing a great deal of confusion for both clients and therapists. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.3.251DOI Listing
January 2017
15 Reads

The Talking Cure of Avoidant Personality Disorder: Remission through Earned-Secure Attachment.

Authors:
Jeffrey Guina

Am J Psychother 2016;70(3):233-250

Mental Health Clinic, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH, USA.

The concept of earned security is important and has significant implications for psychotherapy. Understanding how individuals with insecure attachment styles can develop secure attachment styles through reparative relationships, such as the therapeutic relationship, can assist psychotherapists in helping patients to overcome the effects of early negative life experiences. Personality disorders are commonly associated with negative experiences, such as abuse, neglect, and other empathic failures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.3.233DOI Listing
January 2017
12 Reads

A Procedure to Graph the Quality of Psychosocial Functioning Affected by Symptom Severity.

Am J Psychother 2016 ;70(2):222-31

Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.

Assessment of the variations of clinical course to aid in diagnosis, assessment of patients' functioning and to guide treatment planning has gained momentum in recent years. A specific scale is introduced to plot the temporal course to assist empirically-minded psychotherapists and researchers who treat the DSM-5 Disorders and who want to monitor the quality of the course of psychosocial functioning over time. A Timeline Course Graphing Scale to Chart the Quality of Psychosocial Functioning Affected by Symptom Severity (PFS) is described and accompanied by administration guidelines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.2.222DOI Listing
August 2016
17 Reads

The Relationship between Depression Severity and Cognitive Errors.

Am J Psychother 2016 ;70(2):203-21

Department of Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

Cognitive errors (CEs) are evidenced to be related to depressive thinking in major depressive disorder (Beck Et Al., 1979; Dozois & Beck, 2008). Studies using self-report questionnaires demonstrate that CEs are more prevalent in individuals with depression than in non-depressed individuals (Gupta & Kar, 2008) and that CEs are related to depression severity (Miranda & Mennin, 2007). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.2.203DOI Listing
August 2016
12 Reads

Naturalistic Outcomes of Evidence-Based Therapies for Borderline Personality Disorder at a Medical University Clinic.

Am J Psychother 2016 ;70(2):167-84

Department of Psychiatry, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, USA.

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and dynamic deconstructive psychotherapy (DDP) are listed in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices based on their performances in randomized controlled trials. However, little is known about their effectiveness in real-world settings. In the present study, the authors observed the naturalistic outcomes of 68 clients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) who were treated at a medical university clinic by experienced therapists using either comprehensive DBT (n = 25) or DDP (n = 27), with 16 clients treated with unstructured psychotherapy serving as a control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.2.167DOI Listing
August 2016
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Cultural Humility in Psychotherapy Supervision.

Am J Psychother 2016 ;70(2):149-66

University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA.

As a core component of multicultural orientation, cultural humility can be considered an important attitude for clinical supervisees to adopt and practically implement. How can cultural humility be most meaningfully incorporated in supervision? In what ways can supervisors stimulate the development of a culturally humble attitude in our supervisees? We consider those questions in this paper and present a model for addressing cultural humility in clinical supervision. The primary focus is given to two areas: (a) modeling and teaching of cultural humility through interpersonal interactions in supervision, and (b) teaching cultural humility through outside activities and experiences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.2.149DOI Listing
August 2016
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An Introduction to Using the Method of Levels (MOL) Therapy to Work with People Experiencing Psychosis.

Authors:
Sara J Tai

Am J Psychother 2016 ;70(1):125-48

School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

This paper provides a basic introduction to using method of levels (MOL) therapy with people experiencing psychosis. As MOL is a direct application of perceptual control theory (PCT), a brief overview of the three main theoretical principles of this theory--control, conflict, and reorganization will be outlined in relation to understanding psychosis. In particular, how these principles form the basis of problem conceptualisation and determine what an MOL therapist is required to do during therapy will be illustrated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.1.125DOI Listing
May 2016
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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Olfactory Hallucinations and Associated Delusions: A Case Report.

Authors:
David Kimhy

Am J Psychother 2016 ;70(1):117-23

Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, NY, USA.

Olfactory hallucinations (OH) are experienced by a substantial minority of people with schizophrenia, often leading to social anxiety, depression and suffering. Yet, despite their prevalence and clinical significance, OH in schizophrenia are under-researched and poorly understood, with scarce information about potential treatments. To address this gap in the literature, the author describes a case report of successfully using Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for psychosis (CBTp) to address OH, related delusions, as well as mood and social functioning difficulties in a male patient with schizophrenia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.1.117DOI Listing
May 2016
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Hidden in Plain Sight on Locked Wards--On Finding and Being Found.

Authors:
Alfred Margulies

Am J Psychother 2016 ;70(1):101-16

Boston Psychoanalytic Institute, Harvard Medical School at the Cambridge Health Alliance, Cambridge, MA, USA.

Lost and falling, the feeling that life is disorienting: none of us escapes the experience. For those clinicians who venture on to inpatient wards, lost-ness takes on a special urgency. But what does it mean to "find" another? Surely feeling lost is at the heart of our existential search for grounding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.1.101DOI Listing
May 2016
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Psychotherapy Techniques for Patients Diagnosed with Schizophrenia.

Am J Psychother 2016 ;70(1):63-78

Columbia University, NY, NY, USA.

The paper describes how standard psychotherapy techniques need to be modified to suit the specialized needs of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Patients with psychosis often have lost their ability to use words to describe their inner states. As a result, traditional forms of psychotherapy which depend so crucially on the use of language are compromised. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.1.63DOI Listing
May 2016
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Psychosis, Trauma, and Ordinary Mental Life.

Authors:
Michael Garrett

Am J Psychother 2016 ;70(1):35-62

SUNY Downstate Faculty, Psychoanalytic Institute at NYU Medical Center, USA.

Psychotherapy has gained wide acceptance as a primary treatment for nonpsychotic psychological disorders but has yet to find the same acceptance in the treatment of psychosis. One reason for this is the idea that schizophrenia is a genetically determined brain disease unlikely to respond to psychological treatments. A second reason is the difficulty most people have in relating the symptoms of psychosis such as hallucinations and delusions to their own mental processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.1.35DOI Listing
May 2016
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Social Adversity in the Etiology of Psychosis: A Review of the Evidence.

Am J Psychother 2016 ;70(1):5-33

Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.

Despite increasing evidence for the role of psychosocial factors in the onset and continuance of psychosis, the experiences involved are still largely considered the result of a biogenetic anomaly for which medication is the first-line treatment response. This review summarizes the extensive literature demonstrating that adverse events involving trauma, loss, stress, and disempowerment have a central etiological role in psychosis. Evidence is further presented to show that many neurological changes traditionally considered indicative of a disease process can in fact be accounted for as secondary effects to the physiology of stress or the residual of long-term neuroleptic prescription. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.psychotherapy.2016.70.1.5DOI Listing
May 2016
30 Reads