6,301 results match your criteria American journal of preventive medicine[Journal]


The Relationship Between Hearing Loss and Substance Use Disorders Among Adults in the U.S.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

VA Center for Clinical Management Research (CCMR), VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Introduction: Hearing loss is common and associated with poorer health and impeded communication. Little is known about the association between hearing loss and substance use disorders in the general population. The objective of this study was to assess substance use disorder prevalence among individuals with hearing loss, versus those without hearing loss, in a nationally representative sample of adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.10.026DOI Listing
February 2019

Workplace Smoke-Free Policies and Cessation Programs Among U.S. Working Adults.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Respiratory Health Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morgantown, West Virginia.

Introduction: Workplace tobacco control interventions reduce smoking and secondhand smoke exposure among U.S. workers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.10.030DOI Listing
February 2019

National Trends in Human Papillomavirus Awareness and Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus-Related Cancers.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Behavioral Research Program, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland.

Introduction: The President's Cancer Panel released a report in 2014 calling for communication strategies to promote the human papillomavirus vaccine among males and females. The purpose of this study was to (1) estimate changes in human papillomavirus awareness and knowledge of human papillomavirus-related cancers from 2014 to 2017 using a nationally representative survey of adults in the U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.11.005DOI Listing
February 2019

Impact of Risk Stratification on Referrals and Uptake of Wraparound Services That Address Social Determinants: A Stepped Wedged Trial.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Health Policy and Management, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana; Regenstrief Institute, Indianapolis, Indiana; Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Introduction: Social determinants of health are critical drivers of health status and cost, but are infrequently screened or addressed in primary care settings. Systematic approaches to identifying individuals with unmet social determinants needs could better support practice workflows and linkages of patients to services. A pilot study examined the effect of a risk-stratification tool on referrals to services that address social determinants in an urban safety-net population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.11.009DOI Listing
February 2019

Compressed Influenza Vaccination in U.S. Older Adults: A Decision Analysis.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Family Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Introduction: Tradeoffs exist between efforts to increase influenza vaccine uptake, including early season vaccination, and potential decreased vaccine effectiveness if protection wanes during influenza season. U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.11.015DOI Listing
February 2019

Physical Activity and Social Behaviors of Urban Children in Green Playgrounds.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of Kinesiology, Occidental College, Los Angeles, California.

Introduction: Nature exposure is associated with many wellbeing benefits. However, the influence of green space on the physical activity and social behaviors of children is not completely understood. The purpose of the study was to complete a stepwise impact evaluation of a large-scale playground greening project at a Title 1 elementary school in Los Angeles, California. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.11.004DOI Listing
February 2019

Impact of Perceived Racism on Healthcare Access Among Older Minority Adults.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Department, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut; Department of Psychology, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.

Introduction: Older minority individuals are less likely to receive adequate health care than their white counterparts. This study investigates whether perceived racism is associated with delayed/forgone care among minority older adults, and whether poor doctor communication mediates this relationship.

Methods: Study cohort consisted of minority participants, aged ≥65 years, in the 2015 California Health Interview Survey (N=1,756). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.10.010DOI Listing
February 2019

Positive Parenting Matters in the Face of Early Adversity.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Section of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Electronic address:

Introduction: A negative relationship between adverse childhood experiences and both physical and mental health in adulthood is well established, as is the positive impact of parenting on child development and future health. However, few studies have investigated unique influences of adverse childhood experiences and positive parenting together within a large, diverse early childhood sample.

Methods: The study used data on all children aged 0-5 years (n=29,997) from the National Survey of Children's Health 2011/2012 to examine effects of positive parenting practices and adverse childhood experiences on early childhood social-emotional skills and general development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.11.018DOI Listing
February 2019

Colorectal Cancer Screening in Black Men: Recommendations for Best Practices.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S95-S102

Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Screening for colorectal cancer has been demonstrated to reduce colorectal cancer mortality. Blacks have a higher mortality from this malignancy, particularly men, yet screening rates in this population are often found to be lower than in whites. A modest literature demonstrates effective interventions that can increase screening rates in blacks; however, results are not consistent and ongoing work is required. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.05.008DOI Listing
November 2018

Preventing Violent Encounters Between Police and Young Black Men: A Comparative Case Study.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S88-S94

Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Introduction: In the past several years, high profile events have drawn attention to the longstanding problem of violent encounters between police and young black men in the U.S. This paper highlights the results of a 1-year qualitative study to describe (1) perceptions of police-youth violence prevention policies, programs, and practices; and (2) existing infrastructures that can be leveraged to strengthen police-youth violence prevention efforts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.05.016DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Parents Speak: A Needs Assessment for Community Programming for Black Male Youth.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S82-S87

Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. Electronic address:

Introduction: Although adolescence can be a difficult developmental period for all children, negative environmental forces make this period particularly risky for many inner-city black males. As part of the Center for Healthy African American Men through Partnerships, this project is utilizing community-based participatory concepts to design and implement programs to address risk-taking behaviors among middle school black males.

Methods: In 2014, parents of black males between the ages of 11 and 14years were recruited from an urban middle school to participate in focus group discussions. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07493797183190
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.05.014DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Implementing the Communities That Care Prevention System: Challenges, Solutions, and Opportunities in an Urban Setting.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S70-S81

University of Washington School of Social Work, Seattle, Washington.

Introduction: Communities That Care, refined and tested for more than 25years, offers a step-by-step coalition-based approach to promote well-being and prevent risk behaviors among youth. Communities That Care guides coalitions to identify and prioritize underlying risk and protective factors; set specific, measurable community goals; adopt tested, effective prevention programs to target selected factors; and implement chosen programs with fidelity. Communities That Care has been implemented in a variety of communities, but has only recently begun to be systematically evaluated in diverse, urban communities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.05.019DOI Listing
November 2018

Community Readiness to Adopt the Communities That Care Prevention System in an Urban Setting.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S59-S69

Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Electronic address:

Introduction: This manuscript highlights initial activities from a 5-year project to build a community coalition focused on the promotion of family, school, and community connectedness; academic investment; and social and emotional well-being among black male youth and their families, as well as the prevention and reduction of risk behaviors. Project activities were planned according to the step-by-step coalition-based prevention system, Communities That Care.

Methods: During Year 1 (2013/2014), semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 community members (parents, school administrators and teachers, and community leaders and volunteers) to evaluate readiness to adopt Communities That Care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.05.022DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Penetrating Colon Trauma Outcomes in Black and White Males.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S5-S13

Department of Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, California.

Introduction: Racial disparities have been both published and disputed in trauma patient mortality, outcomes, and rehabilitation. In this study, the objective was to assess racial disparities in patients with penetrating colon trauma.

Methods: The National Trauma Data Bank was searched for males aged ≥14years from 2010 through 2014 who underwent operative intervention for penetrating colon trauma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.05.007DOI Listing
November 2018

Designing Faith-Based Blood Pressure Interventions to Reach Young Black Men.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S49-S58

Division of Preventive Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.

Introduction: This community-based participatory research pilot study explored multilevel perceptions and strategies for developing future faith-based organization blood pressure interventions for young black men.

Methods: Community partners recruited the sample through two, southeastern U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.05.009DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Racial and Geographic Disparities in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Outcomes.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S40-S48

Emergency Department, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.

Introduction: Hepatocellular carcinoma disproportionately affects minorities. Southern states have high proportions of black populations and prevalence of known risk factors. Further research is needed to understand the role of southern geography in hepatocellular carcinoma disparities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.05.030DOI Listing
November 2018

A National Study of U.S. Emergency Departments: Racial Disparities in Hospitalizations for Heart Failure.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S31-S39

Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.

Introduction: Racial disparities in heart failure hospitalizations are well documented. The majority of heart failure hospitalizations originate from emergency departments, but emergency department hospitalization patterns for heart failure and the factors that influence hospitalization are poorly understood. This gap in knowledge was examined using a nationally representative sample of emergency department visits for heart failure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.05.020DOI Listing
November 2018

Health System Affiliation and 30-Day Readmission After Heart Attack in Black Men.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S22-S30

Department of Health Services Administration, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.

Introduction: Black patients who experience acute myocardial infarction and receive care in high minority-serving hospitals have higher readmission rates. This study explores how hospital system affiliation (centralized versus decentralized/independent) impacts 30-day readmissions after acute myocardial infarction in black men.

Methods: In 2018, the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Database (2009-2013) was used to observe 30-day readmission for acute myocardial infarction by race, and data from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey of Hospitals (2009-2013) to determine hospital system affiliation for the states Arizona, California, North Carolina, and Wisconsin. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.05.021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6345181PMC
November 2018

Racial Disparities in Surgical Outcomes Among Males Following Major Urologic Cancer Surgery.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S14-S21

Department of Urology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Introduction: Disparities in healthcare outcomes between races have been extensively described; however, studies fail to characterize the contribution of differences in distribution of covariates between groups and the impact of discrimination. This study aims to characterize the degree to which clinicodemographic factors and unmeasured confounders are contributing to any observed disparities between non-Hispanic white and black males on surgical outcomes after major urologic cancer surgery.

Methods: Non-Hispanic white and black males undergoing radical cystectomy, nephrectomy, or prostatectomy for cancer in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database from 2007 to 2016 were included in this analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.05.012DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Universal Screening for HIV and Hepatitis C Infection: A Community-Based Pilot Project.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S112-S121

School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.

Introduction: Black men in the Deep South have been disproportionally affected by high HIV and hepatitis C virus infection rates. Conventional clinic-based screening approaches have had limited success in reaching those with undiagnosed HIV or hepatitis C virus infection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the acceptability, feasibility, and best practices of an integrated HIV and hepatitis C virus community-based health screening approach. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07493797183190
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.05.015DOI Listing
November 2018
5 Reads

Attitudes Toward Genomic Testing and Prostate Cancer Research Among Black Men.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S103-S111

Department of Urology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Introduction: Black men are diagnosed with prostate cancer at nearly twice the rate of white men and are underrepresented in prostate cancer research, including validation studies of new clinical tools (e.g., genomic testing). Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07493797183194
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.05.028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6352989PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

African American Men's Health: Research, Practice, and Policy.

Am J Prev Med 2018 Nov;55(5S1):S1-S4

Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.07.011DOI Listing
November 2018

Prevalence and Correlates of Diabetes Prevention Program Referral and Participation.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Jan 10. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

Introduction: As the burden of type 2 diabetes rises, there is increasing focus on improving the reach of evidence-based lifestyle interventions. Using nationally representative data, this study identifies how frequently at-risk adults are being referred to and participating in diabetes prevention programming, and explores correlates of referral, participation, and interest.

Methods: Data from the 2016 National Health Interview Survey, a cross-sectional survey of U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.10.005DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Trends in Receipt of Contraceptive Services: Young Women in the U.S., 2002-2015.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Jan 14. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Guttmacher Institute, Research Division, New York, New York.

Introduction: In order to understand adolescent girls' and young women's use of contraceptive services, this paper examines trends in receipt of contraceptive services, focusing on provider type and payment source.

Methods: The analysis uses nationally representative data from females aged 15-25 years in the 2002, 2006-2010, and 2011-2015 National Surveys of Family Growth. In 2018, summary measures for receipt of any contraceptive service, the type of provider visited and payment used were created and compared across survey years and age groups (15-17 and 18-25 years). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.10.018DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Authors:

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2):334

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.11.003DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Author Response to "Testing Causal Assumptions in Obesity Research".

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2):332-333

Department of Health Services Research and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.08.021DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Testing Causal Assumptions in Obesity Research.

Authors:
Jameson D Voss

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2):331-332

Chief of Precision Medicine Air Force Medical Support Agency Falls Church, Virginia Associate Editor for Social Media International Journal of Obesity.

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07493797183217
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.08.012DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Associations Between Unhealthy Weight-Loss Strategies and Depressive Symptoms.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2):241-250

Center for Value-Based Care Research, Medicine Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.

Introduction: There appears to be a link between weight loss and improved mental health, but less is known about how using unhealthy weight-loss strategies impacts the odds of reporting depression.

Methods: This study includes respondents from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2005 to 2014 who attempted to lose weight over the past year. Analysis occurred in 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.09.017DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Financial Stress and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in the Jackson Heart Study.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2):224-231

Center for Community Health and Health Equity, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of General Medicine and Primary Care, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address:

Introduction: Financial hardship is associated with coronary heart disease risk factors, and may disproportionately affect some African American groups. This study examines whether stress because of financial hardship is associated with incident coronary heart disease in African Americans.

Methods: The Jackson Heart Study is a longitudinal cohort study of cardiovascular disease risks in African Americans in the Jackson, Mississippi metropolitan statistical area. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.09.022DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Finding Pete and Nikki: Defining the Target Audience for "The Real Cost" Campaign.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2S1):S9-S15

Office of Health Communication and Education, Center for Tobacco Products, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland.

Successfully reaching at-risk teens aged 12-17 years with smoking-prevention messages capable of changing their knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cigarette smoking requires a multifaceted approach to understand the target audience's unique demographic, environmental, behavioral, interpersonal, and intrapersonal characteristics. This paper explores the initial target audience segmentation and insights development approach used to create the underlying message strategy for "The Real Cost" youth smoking prevention media campaign-a public education effort responsible for preventing nearly 350,000 U.S. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07493797183224
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.07.040DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Evolving "The Real Cost" Campaign to Address the Rising Epidemic of Youth E-cigarette Use.

Authors:
Mitchell Zeller

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2S1):S76-S78

Office of the Center Director, Center for Tobacco Products, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.09.005DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Identifying Potential Campaign Themes to Prevent Youth Initiation of E-Cigarettes.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2S1):S65-S75

Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Once a target audience and a health behavior of interest are selected for a potential mass media campaign, the next task is selecting beliefs about the health behavior to serve as the basis for campaign message content. For novel health behaviors, such as the use of emerging tobacco products, limited empirical research on beliefs about these behaviors exists. A multimethod approach was applied to generate potential campaign beliefs for emerging behaviors. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07493797183224
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.07.039DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

A Secondary Audience's Reactions to "The Real Cost" Advertisements: Results From a Study of U.S. Young Adult Smokers and Susceptible Nonsmokers.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2S1):S57-S64

Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; School of Media and Journalism, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Introduction: Exposure to "The Real Cost" campaign has prevented smoking initiation among its target audience (U.S. youth aged 12-17 years). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.08.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6373760PMC
February 2019
4 Reads

The Case and Context for "The Real Cost" Campaign.

Authors:
April L Brubach

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2S1):S5-S8

Office of Health Communication and Education, Center for Tobacco Products, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland. Electronic address:

Discussion of how the creation of the Center for Tobacco Products at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, youth trends in cigarette smoking, and effectiveness of mass media interventions served as the foundation for the development of "The Real Cost" youth smoking prevention media campaign. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07493797183224
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.07.042DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

"The Real Cost": Reaching At-Risk Youth in a Fragmented Media Environment.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2S1):S49-S56

Office of Health Communication and Education, Center for Tobacco Products, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland. Electronic address:

In 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration launched its first youth smoking prevention media campaign, "The Real Cost," with the goal of preventing cigarette smoking among at-risk youth aged 12-17 years in the U. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07493797183224
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.07.041DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Adolescents' Neural Response to Tobacco Prevention Messages and Sharing Engagement.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2S1):S40-S48

Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address:

Introduction: Interpersonal communication can reinforce media effects on health behavior. Recent studies have shown that brain activity in the medial prefrontal cortex during message exposure can predict message-consistent behavior change. Key next steps include examining the relationship between neural responses to ads and measures of interpersonal message retransmission that can be collected at scale. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.07.044DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Fear and Humor Appeals in "The Real Cost" Campaign: Evidence of Potential Effectiveness in Message Pretesting.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2S1):S31-S39

Public Health Research and Translational Science, Battelle Memorial Institute, Baltimore, Maryland.

Introduction: In tobacco prevention campaigns, fear-appeal messages are widely used and generally shown to be effective, whereas the utility of humor appeals is less clear. This study compares the potential effectiveness of fear and humor ads developed for "The Real Cost" campaign.

Methods: Adolescents (N=1,315) aged 13-17 years who were either experimenting with smoking or susceptible to smoking initiation were randomized to view either a single ad (of three fear and two humor ads in total) or nothing (control condition). Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07493797183217
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.07.033DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Lessons on Addiction Messages From "The Real Cost" Campaign.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2S1):S24-S30

Public Health Research and Translational Science, Battelle Memorial Institute, Baltimore, Maryland.

Introduction: A key strategy in reducing the public health burden of cigarette smoking is preventing youth from ever becoming addicted to cigarettes in the first place. However, there is limited research exploring youth responses to addiction messages. This study assesses youths' responses to the U. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07493797183224
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.07.043DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Bringing "The Real Cost" to Life Through Breakthrough, Evidence-Based Advertising.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2S1):S16-S23

FCB New York, New York, New York.

Building on the success "The Real Cost" campaign has already achieved requires the constant development of new audience insights, novel ideas, and unconventional ways of bringing the campaign to life. This article provides a high-level overview of the campaign's approach to developing and testing breakthrough advertising that has proven effective in preventing smoking initiation among a skeptical, hard-to-reach, at-risk youth audience. This approach is informed by evidence-based communication best practices for youth behavior change campaigns; insights from published literature and subject matter experts with decades of experience in youth health marketing and tobacco prevention; and findings from formative research studies conducted as part of the campaign development process. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07493797183226
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.08.024DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

How the Food and Drug Administration Convinced Teens to Rethink Their Relationship With Cigarettes.

Authors:
Kathleen Crosby

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb;56(2S1):S1-S4

Office of Health Communication and Education,Center for Tobacco Products, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.10.013DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Repeat Self-Inflicted Injury Among U.S. Youth in a Large Medical Claims Database.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Jan 15. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Introduction: This study describes characteristics of nonfatal self-inflicted injuries and incidence of repeat self-inflicted injuries among a large convenience sample of youth (aged 10-24 years) with Medicaid or commercial insurance.

Methods: In 2018, Truven Health MarketScan medical claims data were used to identify youth with a self-inflicted injury in 2013 (or index self-inflicted injury) diagnosed in any inpatient or outpatient setting. Patients with 2 years of healthcare claims data (1 year before/after index self-inflicted injury) were assessed. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07493797183227
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.09.009DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

BMI, Physical Inactivity, and Pap Test Use in Asian Women in the U.S.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Jan 15. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California.

Introduction: In the U.S., limited epidemiologic studies have investigated associations between BMI and physical inactivity and Pap test use among Asian women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.10.014DOI Listing
January 2019
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Change in Children's Physical Activity: Predictors in the Transition From Elementary to Middle School.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Jan 15. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina.

Introduction: Interventions to promote physical activity in children should be informed by knowledge of the factors that influence physical activity behavior during critical developmental transitions. The purpose of this study is to identify, from a comprehensive, multidomain set of factors, those that are associated with change in objectively measured physical activity in children as they transition from elementary to middle school.

Methods: The study used a prospective cohort design, with children observed in fifth, sixth, and seventh grades. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.10.012DOI Listing
January 2019
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Impacts of Federal Prevention Funding on Reported Gonorrhea and Chlamydia Rates.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Jan 15. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Division of STD Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Introduction: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention allocates funds annually to jurisdictions nationwide for sexually transmitted infection prevention activities. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of federal sexually transmitted infection prevention funding for reducing rates of reported sexually transmitted infections.

Methods: In 2017-2018, finite distributed lag regression models were estimated to assess the impact of sexually transmitted infection prevention funding (in 2016 dollars per capita) on reported chlamydia rates from 2000 to 2016 and reported gonorrhea rates from 1981 to 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.09.012DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Association Between Health Behaviors and Family History of Cancer According to Sex in the General Population.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Jan 12. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Introduction: Family history of cancer and modifiable risk factors are each associated with cancer development, but no studies have assessed their association with each other by sex. This study aimed to examine modifiable risk factors in individuals with a family history of cancer compared with those without a family history of cancer, according to sex.

Methods: This study recruited 166,810 participants aged 40-79 years from Korea's Health Examinee Study cohort between 2004 and 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.10.017DOI Listing
January 2019
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Exposure to Child-Directed TV Advertising and Preschoolers' Intake of Advertised Cereals.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb 17;56(2):e35-e43. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Department of Pediatrics, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire.

Introduction: Child-directed TV advertising is believed to influence children's diets, yet prospective studies in naturalistic settings are absent. This study examined if child-directed TV advertisement exposure for ten brands of high-sugar breakfast cereals was associated with children's intake of those brands prospectively.

Methods: Observational study of 624 preschool-age children and their parents conducted in New Hampshire, 2014-2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.09.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6340774PMC
February 2019
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Child Influenza Vaccination and Adult Work Loss: Reduced Sick Leave Use Only in Adults With Paid Sick Leave.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb 17;56(2):251-261. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

Introduction: Children are a population of interest for influenza. They are at increased risk for severe influenza, comprise a substantial portion of influenza morbidity, and significantly contribute to its transmission in the household and subsequent parental work loss. The association between influenza vaccination and work loss prevention, however, has rarely been studied, and the sparse existing literature has very limited generalizability to U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.09.013DOI Listing
February 2019
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Ingestion of Over-the-Counter Liquid Medications: Emergency Department Visits by Children Aged Less Than 6 Years, 2012-2015.

Am J Prev Med 2019 Feb 17;56(2):288-292. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address:

Introduction: Unintentional medication ingestions by young children lead to nearly 60,000 emergency department visits annually; 15% involve oral liquid medications. Safety packaging improvements have been shown to limit liquid medication ingestions. Estimated rates of emergency department visits for pediatric ingestions by product were calculated to help target interventions. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07493797183233
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.10.004DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads