930 results match your criteria American journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation[Journal]


Striving While Accepting: Exploring the Relationship Between Identity and Implicit Bias Recognition and Management.

Acad Med 2018 Nov;93(11S Association of American Medical Colleges Learn Serve Lead: Proceedings of the 57th Annual Research in Medical Education Sessions):S82-S88

J. Sukhera is assistant professor in psychiatry and paediatrics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada, and a PhD candidate in health professions education, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. M. Wodzinski is an MD candidate, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. P.W. Teunissen is professor of workplace learning in healthcare, Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, and gynecologist, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. L. Lingard is professor, Department of Medicine, and director, Centre for Education Research and Innovation, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. C. Watling is professor and associate dean for postgraduate medical education, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, and scientist, Centre for Education Research and Innovation, London, Ontario, Canada.

Purpose: Implicit biases worsen outcomes for underserved and marginalized populations. Once health professionals are made aware of their implicit biases, a process ensues where they must reconcile this information with their personal and professional identities. The authors sought to explore how identity influences the process of implicit bias recognition and management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000002382DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

How and Why Preclerkship Students Set Learning Goals and Assess Their Achievement: A Qualitative Exploration.

Acad Med 2017 11;92(11S Association of American Medical Colleges Learn Serve Lead: Proceedings of the 56th Annual Research in Medical Education Sessions):S61-S66

P.M. Kindler is senior instructor, Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. J. Bates is professor, Department of Family Practice, and scientist, Centre for Health Education Scholarship, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. E. Hui is clinical assistant professor, Division of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. K.W. Eva is professor, Centre for Health Education Scholarship, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Purpose: Health professionals are expected to routinely assess their weaknesses, set learning goals, and monitor their achievement. Unfortunately, it is well known that these professionals often struggle with effectively integrating external data and self-perceptions. To know how best to intervene, it is critical that the health professionals community understand the cues students and practitioners use to assess their abilities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001913DOI Listing
November 2017
1 Read

Validity Evidence and Scoring Guidelines for Standardized Patient Encounters and Patient Notes From a Multisite Study of Clinical Performance Examinations in Seven Medical Schools.

Acad Med 2017 11;92(11S Association of American Medical Colleges Learn Serve Lead: Proceedings of the 56th Annual Research in Medical Education Sessions):S12-S20

Y.S. Park is associate professor, Department of Medical Education, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8583-4335. A. Hyderi is associate dean for curriculum and associate professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. N. Heine is assistant professor, Department of Medical Education and Department of Medicine, and director, Clinical Skills Education Center, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, California; ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6812-9079. W. May is professor, Department of Medical Education, and director, Clinical Skills Education and Evaluation Center, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. A. Nevins is clinical associate professor, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California. M. Lee is professor of medical education, University of California, Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California. G. Bordage is professor, Department of Medical Education, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. R. Yudkowsky is director, Graham Clinical Performance Center, and professor, Department of Medical Education, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2145-7582.

Purpose: To examine validity evidence of local graduation competency examination scores from seven medical schools using shared cases and to provide rater training protocols and guidelines for scoring patient notes (PNs).

Method: Between May and August 2016, clinical cases were developed, shared, and administered across seven medical schools (990 students participated). Raters were calibrated using training protocols, and guidelines were developed collaboratively across sites to standardize scoring. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001918DOI Listing
November 2017
15 Reads

Rehabilitation Research at the National Institutes of Health:: Moving the Field Forward (Executive Summary).

Phys Ther 2017 04;97(4):393-403

Approximately 53 million Americans live with a disability. For decades, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been conducting and supporting research to discover new ways to minimize disability and enhance the quality of life of people with disabilities. After the passage of the American With Disabilities Act, the NIH established the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research with the goal of developing and implementing a rehabilitation research agenda. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ptj/pzx027DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5437730PMC
April 2017
49 Reads

National Institutes of Health Research Plan on Rehabilitation: NIH Medical Rehabilitation Coordinating Committee.

Phys Ther 2017 04;97(4):104-407

Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH)-all in Bethesda, MD.

One in five Americans experiences disability that affects their daily function because of impairments in mobility, cognitive function, sensory impairment, or communication impairment. The need for rehabilitation strategies to optimize function and reduce disability is a clear priority for research to address this public health challenge. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently published a Research Plan on Rehabilitation that provides a set of priorities to guide the field over the next 5 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ptj/pzx026DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5436691PMC
April 2017
67 Reads

Differential Weighting for Subcomponent Measures of Integrated Clinical Encounter Scores Based on the USMLE Step 2 CS Examination: Effects on Composite Score Reliability and Pass-Fail Decisions.

Acad Med 2016 11;91(11 Association of American Medical Colleges Learn Serve Lead: Proceedings of the 55th Annual Research in Medical Education Sessions):S24-S30

Y.S. Park is assistant professor, Department of Medical Education, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. M. Lineberry is director of Simulation Research, Assessment, and Outcomes, Zamierowski Institute for Experiential Learning, and assistant professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas. A. Hyderi is associate dean for curriculum and associate professor, Department of Family Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. G. Bordage is professor, Department of Medical Education, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. K. Xing is a doctoral student, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Education, Chicago, Illinois. R. Yudkowsky is director, Graham Clinical Performance Center, and associate professor, Department of Medical Education, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.

Purpose: Medical schools administer locally developed graduation competency examinations (GCEs) following the structure of the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 2 Clinical Skills that combine standardized patient (SP)-based physical examination and the patient note (PN) to create integrated clinical encounter (ICE) scores. This study examines how different subcomponent scoring weights in a locally developed GCE affect composite score reliability and pass-fail decisions for ICE scores, contributing to internal structure and consequential validity evidence.

Method: Data from two M4 cohorts (2014: n = 177; 2015: n = 182) were used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001359DOI Listing
November 2016
14 Reads

Cochrane Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine: Current State of Development and Next Steps.

Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2016 Apr;95(4):235-8

Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy and IRCCS Fondazione Don Gnocchi, Milan, Italy Cochrane Child Health Field, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University Medical School, Nashville, Tennessee, Editor in Chief, American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PHM.0000000000000480DOI Listing
April 2016
1 Read

Some reflections on the past, present, and future of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (on the occasion of the 30th SOFMER congress).

Ann Phys Rehabil Med 2016 Apr 11;59(2):79-82. Epub 2016 Mar 11.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Department of Physiology, University of Puerto Rico, School of Medicine, San Juan, Puerto Rico; American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, USA; International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rehab.2016.02.002DOI Listing
April 2016
38 Reads

Physiatry Reviews for Evidence in Practice (PREP), Second-Order Peer Reviews of Clinically Relevant Articles for the Physiatrist.

Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2015 Oct;94(10):820-2

From the Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

The busy clinically active physiatrist who wishes to practice evidence-based medicine has a daunting challenge to keep up to date with the significant amount of new information that is developing and available across the wide spectrum of medical literature. Accordingly, the authors have developed a method to survey the applicable medical literature to identify pertinent and clinically relevant articles. These articles are then critically appraised and presented in a standard format with clinically applicable conclusions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PHM.0000000000000314DOI Listing
October 2015
4 Reads

Three decades of citation classics: the most cited articles in the field of physical medicine and rehabilitation.

PM R 2014 Sep 3;6(9):828-40. Epub 2014 Jun 3.

UC San Diego Orthopedics, San Diego, CA(‡).

With the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation recently celebrating its 75th anniversary, it is an opportune time to assess the impact and influence that physiatric articles and research have had on the field, as well as the greater scientific community. One useful metric of scientific impact is citation count, which is the most common method for analyzing the magnitude of scientific recognition of an individual article. This study presents 2 reading lists of influential physiatric academic journal articles drawn from the Web of Science index based on citation count. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pmrj.2014.05.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6415682PMC
September 2014
1 Read

Writing a case report for the American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine.

Eur J Phys Rehabil Med 2013 Apr;49(2):223-6

Case reports (CR) have led to the description and discovery of new diseases, syndromes, therapeutic complications or side-effects, and previously unknown potential benefits of pharmacologic agents. CRs may also be used as an effective training strategy for novice authors to develop the skills needed for medical writing. Yet, too often, CRs do not follow standards for excellence in scientific writing. Read More

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Publish or perish?: physician research productivity during residency training.

Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2013 Aug;92(8):710-4

Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, USA.

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the rate and the types of resident physician peer-reviewed publications. Variables of interest include the type of publications, subject matter, external funding, study design, and quality of research by resident physicians published while in training.

Design: This is a retrospective cohort study of physicians who passed part II of the American Board of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation certification examination in 2007 and 2008 (N = 654). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PHM.0b013e3182876197DOI Listing

Writing a case report for the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and the European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine.

Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2013 Feb;92(2):183-6

Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Hacettepe University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey.

Case reports (CRs) have led to the description and discovery of new diseases, syndromes, therapeutic complications or side effects, and previously unknown potential benefits of pharmacologic agents. CRs may also be used as an effective training strategy for novice authors to develop the skills needed for medical writing. However, too often, CRs do not follow standards for excellence in scientific writing. Read More

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http://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:land
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PHM.0b013e318283279bDOI Listing
February 2013
1 Read

The reporting of blinding in physical medicine and rehabilitation randomized controlled trials: a systematic review.

J Rehabil Med 2013 Jan;45(1):6-13

Laboratory of Neuromodulation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 02114 Boston, MA, USA.

Objective: To conduct a systematic review evaluating the reporting of blinding in randomized controlled trials published in the field of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation over two time periods.

Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE via PubMed for all randomized controlled trials published in American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clinical Rehabilitation, Disability and Rehabilitation and (Scandinavian) Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine in the years 2000 and 2010.

Study Selection: We initially identified 222 articles, and 139 (62. Read More

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http://www.medicaljournals.se/jrm/content/?doi=10.2340/16501
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/16501977-1071DOI Listing
January 2013
8 Reads

Sample size calculation in physical medicine and rehabilitation: a systematic review of reporting, characteristics, and results in randomized controlled trials.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2011 Feb;92(2):306-15

Laboratory of Neuromodulation, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Objective: To assess systematically the reporting of sample size calculation in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in 5 leading journals in the field of physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R).

Data Sources: The data source was full reports of RCTs in 5 leading PM&R journals (Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clinical Rehabilitation, and Disability and Rehabilitation) between January and December of 1998 and 2008. Articles were identified in Medline. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2010.10.003DOI Listing
February 2011
3 Reads

Level of evidence in four selected rehabilitation journals.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2011 Feb;92(2):299-303

School of Sports Sciences and Technology, University of Pamukkale, Denizli, Turkey.

Objective: To investigate the methodologic quality and level of evidence of publications in major peer-reviewed general rehabilitation journals (Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation [APMR], American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation [AJPMR], Clinical Rehabilitation [CR], and Physical Therapy [PT]).

Design: Descriptive, comparative.

Main Outcome Measures: All the articles published in AJPMR, APMR, CR, and PT between January 2005 and December 2009 were investigated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2010.07.233DOI Listing
February 2011
4 Reads

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE & REHABILITATION.

Authors:

Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2009 Nov;88(11):884-886

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.phm.0000363254.05054.91DOI Listing
November 2009

Reference accuracy in four rehabilitation journals.

Clin Rehabil 2009 Aug 29;23(8):741-5. Epub 2009 May 29.

School of Physiotherapy, Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey.

Objective: To investigate the incidence of reference errors in major peer-reviewed general physical therapy and rehabilitation journals (American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (AJPMR), Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (APMR), Clinical Rehabilitation (CR) and Physical Therapy (PT)).

Design: Descriptive, comparative.

Main Outcome Measures: All issues of the AJPMR, APMR, CR and PT between 2003 and 2007 were studied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0269215508102968DOI Listing
August 2009
5 Reads

Quality of reporting of observational longitudinal research.

Am J Epidemiol 2005 Feb;161(3):280-8

School of Population Health, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Observational longitudinal research is particularly useful for assessing etiology and prognosis and for providing evidence for clinical decision making. However, there are no structured reporting requirements for studies of this design to assist authors, editors, and readers. The authors developed and tested a checklist of criteria related to threats to the internal and external validity of observational longitudinal studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwi042DOI Listing
February 2005
2 Reads

Reading habits of physical medicine and rehabilitation resident physicians.

Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2004 Jul;83(7):551-9

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA.

Objective: To investigate the focus and extent of the resident physician reading habits, to compare how these change over the years of their training, and to compare these habits with those of physiatrists in practice.

Design: A total of 1,076 surveys were sent to 80 physical medicine and rehabilitation residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The questionnaire contained a list of 36 journals pertinent to the field of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Read More

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July 2004
4 Reads

Care home versus hospital and own home environments for rehabilitation of older people.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2003 (2):CD003164

Portsmouth Institute of Medicine, Health and Social Care, University of Portsmouth, St Georges Building, 141 High Street, Portsmouth, Hampshire, UK, PO1 2HY.

Background: Rehabilitation for older people has acquired an increasingly important profile for both policy-makers and service providers within health and social care agencies. This growing demand for rehabilitation services has generated an increased interest in the use of alternative care environments, for example care home environments, for older persons' rehabilitation. At a time when there is pressure for policy decision-makers and service providers to explore the use of such care settings for the provision of rehabilitation for older people, there appears limited evidence on which to base decisions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD003164DOI Listing
July 2003
38 Reads

Statistical methods in rehabilitation literature: a survey of recent publications.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1996 May;77(5):497-500

Moss Rehab Hospital, Philadelphia, PA 19141-3099, USA.

Objective: To document the use of statistical methods in the recent rehabilitation research literature.

Design: Descriptive survey study.

Methods: All 1,039 articles published between January 1990 and December 1993 in the American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation were reviewed for the use of statistical methods. Read More

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Elements of academic productivity: a comparison of PM&R units versus other clinical science units.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1991 Oct;72(11):874-6

Department of PM&R, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor.

In early 1989, the Research Committee of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (AAPM&R) established a subcommittee to develop methods to monitor academic progress in physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) units in the US. To develop an indirect baseline of academic productivity in PM&R, the rates and types of publications by PM&R researchers were assessed in eight peer review medical journals. The journals selected consisted of all issues of the following (published in calendar years 1987 to 1989): Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physical Therapy, Archives of Neurology, Pain, Stroke, Paraplegia, and Arthritis & Rheumatism. Read More

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October 1991

Two-muscle coordination versus natural treadmill locomotion.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Dec;66(6):371-85

Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721.

When a single-muscle learned behavior was superimposed upon natural human treadmill locomotion, in previous work, it operated as a self-contained behavioral unit. The new behavior altered some features, however, of ongoing stepping patterns. These findings prompted broader consideration of how individual muscle actions combine to form large, patterned ensembles. Read More

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December 1987

Relationship between plasma somatomedin C and muscle performance in a geriatric male population.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Dec;66(6):364-70

North Chicago Veterans Administration Center, Illinois.

The purpose of this study was to ascertain if a relationship existed between plasma somatomedin C (SmC) level, as an indicator of growth hormone secretion, and muscle performance. Eighteen community-dwelling men between the ages of 65 and 80 comprised the sample group. Muscle strength, power and endurance were measured isokinetically on the elbow flexors and extensors and on the knee flexors and extensors. Read More

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December 1987

Activity of motor units during concentric and eccentric contractions.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Dec;66(6):338-50

Human Performance Laboratory, Kyoto University, Japan.

Motor unit activity was investigated in the biceps brachii of twelve men during concentric (CC) and eccentric (EC) contractions by means of computer aided intramuscular spike amplitude-frequency (ISAF) histograms and surface EMG frequency power spectral analyses. Simultaneous recordings of the intramuscular and surface EMG signals were made during both types of contractions with the elbow joint angle varying from 30 to 150 degrees in reference to a fully extended position. Results demonstrated that r. Read More

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December 1987

Poliomyelitis: late and unusual sequelae.

Authors:
S J Frustace

Am J Phys Med 1987 Dec;66(6):328-37

Medical University of New Jersey.

The purpose of this study is to provide a thorough and comprehensive description of the late onset manifestations of poliomyelitis (PM). In addition, unusual findings, seen in the post-poliomyelitis period, have been presented to further increase awareness of the potential diversity of the problem. The scope of PM sequelae is broad. Read More

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December 1987

Neurogenic heterotopic ossification.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Dec;66(6):351-63

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Braintree Hospital, Massachusetts 02184.

Neurogenic heterotopic ossification is a potential sequela of neurological disorders, especially spinal cord injury and head injury. The etiology is unknown. Clinical, radiologic, and bone scan findings are typical. Read More

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December 1987

Neuropsycho-social rehabilitation of head injury.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Dec;66(6):315-27

Loewenstein Hospital, Raanana, Israel.

The present article summarizes 10 years of experience in head injury rehabilitation at Loewenstein Rehabilitation Center. The goal of rehabilitation in head injured patients consists of returning to work and adaptation to: interpersonal consequences of disability; new affective needs; and capacity to attend to financial, legal and bureaucratic matters. The achievement of these goals goes far beyond neurological boundaries in the ordinary narrow sense and needs a neuropsycho-social approach. Read More

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December 1987

Medical criteria for active physical therapy. Physician guidelines for patient participation in a program of functional electrical rehabilitation.

Authors:
C A Phillips

Am J Phys Med 1987 Oct;66(5):269-86

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435.

Medical guidelines are presented by which the physician may evaluate a patient for participation in a program of active physical therapy (A.P.T. Read More

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October 1987

Changes of electrically elicited reflexes in hand and forearm muscles in man.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Oct;66(5):308-14

Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.

Cutaneo-muscular reflexes with short and long latency excitatory phases following digital nerve stimulation were observed in the first dorsal interosseus muscle of the hand in healthy subjects. The short latency reflex was obtained also with the H-reflex method in the flexor carpi radialis muscle, stimulating the median nerve, with a mean latency (+/- SE) of 15.4 +/- 0. Read More

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October 1987
2 Reads

Muscle activation during proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching techniques.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Oct;66(5):298-307

Department of Physical Education, University of Oregon, Eugene 97403-1273.

Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques are often used to induce muscle relaxation and increase joint range of motion (ROM). However, the relationship between muscle activation and ROM with PNF is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of three common PNF stretching techniques on hamstring muscle activation and knee extension. Read More

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October 1987
5 Reads

Effect of negative air ionization on hyperactive and autistic children.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Oct;66(5):264-8

Department of Psychiatry, University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson 85724.

Twenty-one attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity and seven autistic children were randomly exposed to negatively ionized and ambient atmospheres under rigorously controlled experimental conditions. The negatively ionized condition did not significantly affect measurements of activity level, impulsivity, reality orientation, destructive/constructiveness, attention, or task performance. Significant results might be obtained if subgroups of known hyperserotoninemic autistic and attention deficit disorder children were exposed to negatively ionized conditions. Read More

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October 1987

Effects of ischemia on myo-electrical signal characteristics during rest and recovery from static work.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Oct;66(5):249-63

Department of Health and Physical Education, Texas A&M University, College Station 77843-4243.

Twenty male college students served as subjects for a study which investigated how artificially-induced ischemia, with and without muscular fatigue, affects the: 1) input/output (IEMG/Force) relationship, and 2) power density spectrum of EMG signals during submaximal static contractions. In the first experiment, subjects maintained constant-force (60% MVC) static handgrip contractions for 55 sec. Following exercise, EMG mean power frequency (MPF) was significantly (P less than 0. Read More

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October 1987

Opportunities for training of rehabilitation medicine personnel in Latin America.

Authors:
H J Flax

Am J Phys Med 1987 Oct;66(5):244-8

Rehabilitation Medicine Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936.

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October 1987

Profile of denials of durable medical equipment for SCI patients by third party payers.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Oct;66(5):238-43

Institute of Rehabilitation and Research, Houston, Texas 77030.

The difficulty in obtaining approval for payment of durable medical equipment by third party payers has impeded the rehabilitation program and discharge planning of many spinal cord patients throughout the country for many years. To gain some insight as to the number and level of patients affected, the kinds of equipment denied, the reasons given for the denial, which third party payers were mostly involved and how the patient and his/her family managed to cope or resolve this problem, a survey was undertaken. Letters were sent to 259 members of the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) asking them to list representative cases where requests for equipment deemed necessary were denied. Read More

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October 1987

Relationship of kyphosis to physical fitness and bone mass on post-menopausal women.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Oct;66(5):219-27

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Kyphosis is commonly associated with ageing and osteoporosis of the spine. This study was conducted to evaluate whether physical fitness and bone mass in post menopausal women, between the ages of 50-60 years, may influence the degree of kyphosis. The level of physical fitness was determined by 1) calculating maximum oxygen uptake, (VO2 max), attained by a graded exercise treadmill test, and 2) evaluating the muscle strength in performing one repetition maximum on the bench press. Read More

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October 1987

Differentiation of maximal from submaximal static elbow flexor efforts by measurement variability.

Authors:
R W Bohannon

Am J Phys Med 1987 Oct;66(5):213-8

Department of Physical Therapy, Cape Fear Valley Medical Center, Fayetteville, North Carolina.

Thirty-one young women subjects performed four maximal and four submaximal elbow flexion efforts. The strength of each effort was measured using make tests and a hand-held dynamometer. The variability of repeated maximal and submaximal tests was determined by calculating CVs for each subject. Read More

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October 1987

Gait changes in adult onset hemiplegia.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Oct;66(5):228-37

Loyola University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Maywood, Illinois 60153.

Multiple parameters of gait were evaluated in 50 adult acquired hemiplegic patients and 30 control patients with no history of gait abnormality and no deviation from normal gait by observational analysis. Findings in the hemiplegic group include: 1) increase in the proportion of the gait cycle spent in stance and double-limb support phases in both the normal and affected limb; 2) consistent deviation from normal gait pattern by observation and objective pattern analysis; 3) abnormal phasic activity of specific muscles and muscle groups in the affected limb; and 4) a consistent electrogoniometric deviation from normal joint ankle progression in the affected hip, knee and ankle. These data lend credence to the hypothesis that gait deviation in adult acquired hemiplegia follows a consistent pattern varying with the severity of central nervous system involvement. Read More

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October 1987

Post-stimulation effects of high-frequency stimulation on sensory discharge from muscle.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Oct;66(5):287-97

Department of Anatomy, UCLA School of Medicine 90024.

Previously the application of stimuli of 600 Hz at adjustable strength applied to a muscle's nerve has been proposed as a means of reducing the muscle's contraction in spastic conditions, or when combined with a second tetanic stimulation, of limiting contraction to smaller, physiologically more relevant motor units in the paralyzed state. The side-effects on muscle spindles of such stimuli as seen in the cat's gastrocnemius are reported. During stimulation axonal impulses followed faithfully for periods running into minutes. Read More

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October 1987

The GPEP report on undergraduate medical education. Implications for rehabilitation medicine. Association of American Medical Colleges, panel on the General Professional Education of the Physician.

Authors:
R L Kirby

Am J Phys Med 1987 Aug;66(4):184-91

Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

The Association of American Medical College's project panel on the General Professional Education of the Physician (GPEP) and College Preparation for Medicine and its working groups appear to share many values with professionals involved in rehabilitation medicine. The GPEP report stresses that learning about disability or functional status, chronic illness and its impact on the individual, his family and the community, and developing the ability to work as a team with other health professionals are important elements in the education of all physicians. Read More

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Influence of caffeine on force and EMG in rested and fatigued muscle.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Aug;66(4):169-83

Department of Health and Physical Education, College of Education, Texas A&M University, College Station 77843.

At present, it is unclear how caffeine induced alterations in neuromuscular function might affect force production and EMG signal characteristics during isometric exercise. These data suggest that acute caffeine ingestion (7 mg/kg) has no significant effect on force production during a maximal isometric hand grip contraction or endurance during a sustained submaximal contraction. Further, maximal motor unit activation, the relationship between submaximal motor unit activation and subsequent force production, and frequency content of the EMG signal were not significantly altered following caffeine ingestion. Read More

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August 1987
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Reeducative treatment of female genuine stress incontinence.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Aug;66(4):155-68

Department of Rehabilitation, I Fraticini Hospital, I.N.R.C.A., Florence, Italy.

Three-months re-education treatment of genuine stress incontinence was given to 26 female outpatients: 22 patients completed the treatment programme and 4 interrupted it for various reasons. The aims of the treatment were both to correct compensatory habits that patients used to conceal or reduce leakage accidents and to give specific education and strengthening of pelvic floor muscles. All patients who completed the three-months treatment definitely improved and 7 were cured. Read More

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The driving environment and visual disability.

Authors:
A H Welner

Am J Phys Med 1987 Jun;66(3):133-7

Visual disability appears to be only one of many visual factors related to traffic accidents. Difficulties in acquisition and selection of necessary visual information from the driving environment seem to be of more significance than has commonly been recognized. Increasing investigation of the visual elements of safe driving environments may be of great benefit to society. Read More

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Effects of graduated compression stockings on blood lactate following an exhaustive bout of exercise.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Jun;66(3):121-32

To determine the effects of wearing graduated compression stockings (GCS) on the exercise response, twelve high fit males served as subjects in a series of two experiments. The first experiment consisted of six subjects performing two tests of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) on a treadmill with and without GCS. The second experiment consisted of six subjects performing three separate three minute tests on a bicycle ergometer at 110% of their VO2 max. Read More

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http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/ajpmr/1987/06000/EFFECTS_OF_GRA
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June 1987
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Muscular compensatory mechanism in the presence of a tendinitis of the supraspinatus.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Jun;66(3):109-20

The aim of this study was to assess the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the middle part of the deltoid and of the supraspinatus muscles in subjects suffering from supraspinatus tendinitis. This experimental group (N = 10) was compared to a control group (N = 10). Each subject performed three isometric contractions for each of four pre- determined levels (5, 20, 35 and 50%) of their maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) during shoulder abduction. Read More

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Relationships among walking performance, postural stability, and functional assessments of the hemiplegic patient.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Apr;66(2):77-90

Fifteen male hemiplegic subjects were tested using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Barthel Index to evaluate their level of function. Walking performance using interrupted light photography and postural maneuvers while standing on a force platform were recorded for all subjects. Significant relationships were found among functional assessments, objective measures of walking, postural stability and between sections of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment. Read More

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Operant conditioning in relation to natural EMG during rapid human walking.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Apr;66(2):59-76

Interactions between specific operant conditioning and ongoing treadmill walking have been characterized in several previous investigations of mechanisms that coordinate locomotion. The present study examined a higher walking velocity in which contractile forces and, by inference, reflex behavior, might be more powerful. Two subjects walked on a motor-driven treadmill at 0. Read More

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Detecting sincerity of effort when measuring grip strength.

Am J Phys Med 1987 Feb;66(1):16-24

The purpose of the present study was to determine whether sincere and faked grip strength measurements could be distinguished from one another by the patterns of measurements obtained for the five handle (hand size) positions of the Jamar dynamometer. Healthy subjects were instructed on different trials to give a sincere, maximal effort or to fake weakness of grip. Results were that the patterns did differ for sincere and fake trials, but not as strongly as expected. Read More

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February 1987

Contrasting perceptions of distress by research personnel and their spinal cord injured subjects.

Authors:
F A Ernst

Am J Phys Med 1987 Feb;66(1):12-5

Theoretical approaches to the understanding of psychological adjustment in spinal cord injury have recently experienced a re-examination which seriously questions the traditional "stage theory" of adjustment. Despite limited empirical validation at best, the stage theory has not only enjoyed an unchallenged popularity amongst rehabilitation professionals but often has been imposed upon new SCI patients as a necessary criterion for hospital discharge. Experienced professionals have also been shown to exaggerate the distress of their SCI patients and these misperceptions tend to progressively worsen with length of clinical experience. Read More

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February 1987