12 results match your criteria American journal of men\'s health[Journal]

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The medicalization of obesity, bariatric surgery, and population health.

Health (London) 2017 09 16;21(5):498-518. Epub 2016 Aug 16.

Harvard University, USA.

This article examines how the medicalization of obesity validates the use of bariatric surgery to treat obesity in the United States and how expansions in access to bariatric surgery normalize surgical procedures as disease treatment and prevention tools. Building on this discussion, the article poses two questions for population health regarding health technology: (1) to what extent does bariatric surgery treat obesity in the United States while diverting attention away from the ultimate drivers of the epidemic and (2) to what extent does bariatric surgery improve outcomes for some groups in the US population while simultaneously generating disparities? We conduct a brief, historical analysis of the American Medical Association's decision to reclassify obesity as a disease through internal documents, peer-reviewed expert reports, and major media coverage. We use medicalization theory to show how this decision by the American Medical Association channels increased focus on obesity into the realm of medical intervention, particularly bariatric surgery, and use this evidence to review research trends on bariatric surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459316660858DOI Listing
September 2017
3 Reads

The existential cancer journey: Travelling through the intersubjective structure of homeworld/alienworld.

Health (London) 2017 07 20;21(4):375-391. Epub 2015 Nov 20.

University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.

In the past couple of decades, there has been significant interest in the research literature and patient narratives that focus on describing the cancer journey as involving existential and spiritual transformative experiences. The purpose of this article is to contribute with a new and deepened understanding of the existing literature by offering a philosophical informed analytic conceptualization that highlights the 'liminal', transformative and 'generative' dimension of the cancer journey. For that purpose, qualitative data drawn from a qualitative study investigating existential experiences of a group of Danish patients in rehabilitation were analysed employing the American phenomenologist Anthony J. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459315617312DOI Listing

Stress Intervention and Disease in African American Lupus Patients: The Balancing Lupus Experiences with Stress Strategies (BLESS) Study.

Health (Irvine Calif) 2014 Jan;6(1):71-79

Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Suite 816, Charleston, SC 29425 and Medical Service, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2014.61011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4052946PMC
January 2014
2 Reads

Recognizing medicalization and demedicalization: discourses, practices, and identities.

Authors:
Drew Halfmann

Health (London) 2012 Mar 3;16(2):186-207. Epub 2011 May 3.

University of California, Davis, USA.

Scholars of the medicalization of social problems have paid inadequate attention to medicalization's multiple dimensions - discourses, practices and identities - and to the multiple levels of analysis at which it occurs - macro, meso and micro. As a result, scholars of a given social problem typically examine only a few aspects of its medicalization, fail to recognize changes in medicalization, and miss occasions where medicalization and demedicalization occur simultaneously. Moreover, by conceptualizing medicalization as a category or state rather than a continuous value, and failing to specify the threshold at which a phenomenon becomes 'medicalized' or 'demedicalized', scholars have discouraged attention to demedicalization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459311403947DOI Listing
March 2012
4 Reads

Heal thyself: Dealing with trauma work--Gaza 2008/2009.

Health (London) 2011 Jan;15(1):22-37

University of California San Francisco, USA.

We report the case of a Palestinian American psychologist trained to work with psychologically traumatized patients, who consulted with one World Health Organization mental health practitioner assisting the people of Gaza during the Israeli invasion of December 2008. We describe the unresolved tension experienced by the consulting provider, between feelings of helplessness and horror associated with the attack and the drive to assist a client, in this case a colleague, a drive that characterizes the helping professions generally, and discuss ways to improve healthcare providers' abilities to deal with trauma work. Our goal is to call attention to one overlooked health effect of the continuing military occupation of the Palestinian territories (oPT), that is, its impact on healthcare providers, by giving voice to these providers, and to elaborate on the limitations of existing categories and theoretical frameworks to conceptualize and address trauma work in the oPT and similar settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459309360799DOI Listing
January 2011

Residential smoking restrictions are not associated with reduced child SHS exposure in a baseline sample of low-income, urban African Americans.

Health (Irvine Calif) 2010 Nov;2(11):1264-1271

Temple University Department of Public Health, Philadelphia, USA.

Second hand smoke exposure (SHSe) relates to many chronic and acute illnesses. Low income African American (AA) maternal smokers and their children have disproportionately higher tobacco-use and child SHSe-related morbidity and mortality than other populations. While public health officials promote residential smoking restrictions to reduce SHSe and promote smoking cessation, little is known about the impact of restrictions in changing smoking behavior and SHSe in this population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2010.211188DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3715960PMC
November 2010
6 Reads

Privatization within the Dutch context: a comparison of the health insurance systems of the Netherlands and the United States.

Health (London) 2010 Nov;14(6):603-18

Sociology Department, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045–2172, USA.

In 2006, the Netherlands passed the Health Insurance Act requiring all legal residents to obtain health insurance from private insurance companies. The reform created a national health insurance system guaranteed to all citizens regardless of income or labor force status and introduced a market orientation that makes private insurance companies the sole providers of health insurance. How does the new policy compare to the US model of private health insurance provision? Is this reform evidence of a shift toward the American model? We use a comparative case study method to distinguish the new Dutch system from the private insurance system in the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459309360790DOI Listing
November 2010

Cultural brokerage: Creating linkages between voices of lifeworld and medicine in cross-cultural clinical settings.

Health (London) 2010 Sep;14(5):484-504

University of California - Davis, 95616, USA.

Culturally competent healthcare has emerged as a policy solution to racial and ethnic health disparities in the United States. Current research indicates that patient-centered care is a central component of culturally competent healthcare, and a rich literature exists on how to elicit patients' lifeworld voices through open-ended questions, sensitive communication skills, and power-sharing interaction styles. But it remains largely unclear how doctors create linkages between cultures of medicine and lifeworld as two sets of incongruent meaning systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459309360795DOI Listing
September 2010
11 Reads

Trends in attention to complementary and alternative medicine in the American medical literature.

Authors:
Terri A Winnick

Health (London) 2007 Jul;11(3):371-99

Department of Sociology, The Ohio State University-Mansfield, Ohio 44906, USA.

For decades, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has been a topic of discussion within American medical journals. This research examines trends in the amount of coverage CAM receives in top professional journals in US medicine in order to ascertain if the timing of this discussion is linked to demographic, economic or political changes occurring in US society and affecting organized medicine. Pooled time series analyses of the number of published documents in five prestigious American medical journals between 1965 and 1999 were conducted, and findings of models with unlagged and lagged variables are presented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459307077550DOI Listing

Health as a meaningful social practice.

Authors:
Robert Crawford

Health (London) 2006 Oct;10(4):401-20

University of Washington, Tacoma, Washington 98402-3100, USA.

The pursuit of health has become a highly valued activity in modern and contemporary life, commanding enormous resources and generating an expansive professionalization and commercialization along with attendant goods, services and knowledge. Health has also become a focal, signifying practice. As a 'key word', health is constructed in relation to social structures and experience and systematically articulated with other meanings and practices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459306067310DOI Listing
October 2006
10 Reads

Toward a vulnerable ethics of research practice.

Authors:
Cheryl Mattingly

Health (London) 2005 Oct;9(4):453-71

University of Southern California, USA.

This article considers ethical dilemmas concerning the protection of confidentiality that often arise in carrying out ethnographic research. A number of problematic assumptions are highlighted that generally (implicitly or explicitly) guide the practice of contemporary research ethics review committees: (1) ethical rules are context free; (2) there is always an ethical 'right answer'; (3) there is an objective position from which to judge what one ought ethically to do. Notably, this is a position of emotional detachment from the situation; (4) this objectively identified ethical position can be articulated in explicit and unambiguous public language. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459305056413DOI Listing
October 2005
5 Reads

Self-reported health in Poland and the United States: a comparative analysis of demographic, family and socioeconomic influences.

Health (London) 2004 Jan;8(1):5-31

Institute for Health Policy and Health Services Research, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, OH 45267-0840, USA.

This study compares the social determinants of individual health between the United States, a capitalist society, and Poland, a 'post-communist' society. The effects of demographic factors, family characteristics and socioeconomic status on self-reported health are estimated with OLS regression using data from the 1994 American and Polish General Social Surveys. The results show lower self-reported health and more rapid declines in health for people over 60 in Poland than in the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459304038793DOI Listing
January 2004
2 Reads
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