5,422 results match your criteria American journal of industrial medicine[Journal]


Respiratory protection for health care workers: A 2020 COVID-19 perspective.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jun 4. Epub 2020 Jun 4.

Community, Environment & Policy Department, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona.

As the US health care system began to respond to the coronavirus disease-2019 pandemic, demand for respiratory personal protective equipment (PPE) increased precipitously, as did the number of users. This commentary discusses ensuing deviations from accepted respiratory PPE program practices, which potentially increased risk to health care workers. Such lapses included omitting user training and fit testing, provision of unapproved devices, and application of devices in settings and ways for which they were not intended. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23144DOI Listing

Evaluating Oregon's occupational public health surveillance system based on the CDC updated guidelines.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jun 1. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

School of Biological and Population Health Sciences, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon.

Background: The Oregon Occupational Public Health Program (OOPHP) monitors occupational health indicators (OHIs) to inform occupational safety and health (OSH) surveillance. In 2018, OOPHP evaluated the performance of the OSH surveillance system and identified areas for future improvement.

Methods: Following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated guidelines for evaluating public health surveillance systems, the OOPHP evaluation team engaged internal and external stakeholders using a mixed-methods approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23139DOI Listing

Persistent and emerging hazards contributing to work-related fatalities in Alaska.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jun 1. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Anchorage, Alaska.

Background: Workers in Alaska have an elevated risk of dying on the job compared to workers in the rest of the United States. The purpose of this study was to measure and describe the trend in fatalities during the 15-year period 2004 to 2018, and to identify lingering and emerging hazards that result in fatalities.

Methods: Data on fatal work-related injuries in Alaska during 2004 to 2018 were obtained from the Alaska Occupational Injury Surveillance System. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23137DOI Listing

Benzene exposure-response and risk of lymphoid neoplasms in Chinese workers: A multicenter case-cohort study.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 31. Epub 2020 May 31.

Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Rockville, Maryland.

Background: While international agreement supports a causal relationship of benzene exposure with acute myeloid leukemia, there is debate about benzene and lymphoid neoplasm risks.

Methods: In a case-cohort study with follow-up of 110 631 Chinese workers during 1972-1999, we evaluated benzene exposure-response for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), lymphoid leukemias (LL), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and total lymphoid neoplasms (LN). We estimated benzene exposures using state-of-the-art hierarchical modeling of occupational factors calibrated with historical routine measurements and evaluated cumulative exposure-response using Cox regression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23142DOI Listing

A novel COVID-19 based truck driver syndemic? Implications for public health, safety, and vital supply chains.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 26. Epub 2020 May 26.

College of Business Administration, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida.

U.S. long-haul truck drivers traverse great distances and interact with numerous individuals, rendering them vulnerable to acquiring and transmitting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23138DOI Listing

Hematologic malignancy in tanker crewmembers: A case-referent study among male Swedish seafarers.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 23. Epub 2020 May 23.

Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Background: Work on Swedish petroleum tankers before the late 1980s has been associated with an increased risk of hematologic malignancy (HM). Since then, ship modernizations have decreased occupational exposure to gases, including the carcinogen benzene. We explored the risk of HMs in Swedish seafarers who had worked on newer types of tankers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23122DOI Listing

Demographic considerations in analyzing decedents by usual occupation.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 23. Epub 2020 May 23.

Division of Field Studies and Engineering, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cinicinnati, Ohio.

Background: Public health research uses decedents' usual industry and occupation (I&O) from US death certificates to assess mortality incidence and risk factors. Of necessity, such research may exclude decedents with insufficient I&O information, and assume death certificates reflect current (at time of death) I&O. This study explored the demographic implications of such research conditions by describing usual occupation and current employment status among decedents by demographic characteristics in a large multistate data set. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23123DOI Listing

Association between longest-held occupation and Social Security Disability Insurance benefits receipt.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 23. Epub 2020 May 23.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Cincinnati, Ohio.

Introduction: The cost of the Social Security Disability Insurance (DI) program has increased over time though recent reports showed that disability incidence and prevalence rates have started declining. We explored whether occupation was one of the risk factors for the rising number of disabled workers who received DI benefits during 1992-2016.

Methods: We used a cohort of 16 196 Health and Retirement Survey respondents between the age of 51 and 64 years who were followed from their date of entry until they received DI benefits, died, reached full retirement age, or reached the end of the follow-up period (2016). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23121DOI Listing

Socioeconomic status, work-life conflict, and mental health.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 17. Epub 2020 May 17.

Department of Public Health Science, Graduate School of Public Health and Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.

Background: Work-life conflict (WLC) has a critical effect on employee mental health. However, research on occupational health has neglected the family domain. Furthermore, although it is reasonable to assume that the effect of WLC on health may differ according to socioeconomic circumstances, there is little empirical evidence for differences in the impact of WLC by socioeconomic status (SES). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23118DOI Listing

Systematic review of posttraumatic stress disorder in police officers following routine work-related critical incident exposure.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jul 17;63(7):600-615. Epub 2020 May 17.

Department of Educational & Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

Background: The prevalence of PTSD in police officers has been the subject of a large and highly variable empirical literature. The present systematic review evaluates the extant literature on PTSD in police officers using an international dataset.

Methods: We employed best-evidence narrative synthesis to evaluate whether PTSD prevalence in police is elevated in comparison to the general population of Canada (8%), which itself has a higher lifetime PTSD prevalence than many other regions and thus serves as a conservative standard of comparison. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23120DOI Listing

Adult lead exposure from ammunition reloading and indoor residential shooting.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 11. Epub 2020 May 11.

National Capital Poison Center, Washington, DC.

The use and maintenance of firearms is a common and often preventable source of adult lead exposure that is often poorly understood by medical professionals. This case describes an elevated blood lead level (BLL) in an adult man due to the exposure sources of ammunition reloading and indoor target shooting in the basement of his home and details the challenges involved in the diagnosis and management of such cases. The elevated BLL was reduced through strict attention to personal hygiene during the reloading process and while shooting, improved ventilation and cleaning of the basement, and avoidance of vacuuming and use of dry cleaning techniques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23119DOI Listing

Types of ocular injury and their antecedent factors: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jul 7;63(7):589-599. Epub 2020 May 7.

Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Ocular injuries are an important workplace hazard that can lead to vision loss, decreased functioning, and socioeconomic costs. The aim of this systematic review is to identify types of occupational ocular injuries and examine factors associated with these injuries.

Methods: Four health sciences databases (Ovid Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and CINAHL) were reviewed to identify evidence pertaining to occupational ocular injuries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23117DOI Listing

Associations between exposure to ethylene oxide, job termination, and cause-specific mortality risk.

Authors:
Robert M Park

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jul 7;63(7):577-588. Epub 2020 May 7.

Education and Information Division, Risk Evaluation Branch, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Background: Previous analyses of mortality were conducted in a large cohort of ethylene oxide (EtO) exposed workers employed at 13 sterilization facilities throughout the U.S. and followed from the start of operation through 1998. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23115DOI Listing

Analysis of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) noise standard violations over 50 years: 1972 to 2019.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jul 4;63(7):616-623. Epub 2020 May 4.

Department of Community Health Systems, Occupational and Environmental Health Nursing Graduate Program, School of Nursing, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

Introduction: Noise exposure has long been an occupational health concern and has been an important area of focus of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) since its founding. Nevertheless, it remains unclear what effects OSHA's noise standards have had on employer efforts to reduce risks. Consequently, a review of OSHA noise standard violations was performed to clarify the violation trends between 1972 and 2019. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23116DOI Listing
July 2020
1.590 Impact Factor

The health of restaurant work: A historical and social context to the occupational health of food service.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jul 23;63(7):563-576. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

Collaborative for Health Equity Cook County, Chicago, Illinois.

The United States currently has over one million restaurants, making food service one of the largest workforces and industry sectors in the nation's economy. Historically, concern for the health of early restaurant workers was tied largely to the hygiene of the food and thus the wellbeing of the customer rather than the individuals preparing the food. The landscape of occupational illness and injury that resulted is fraught with some of the starkest health disparities in wages, discrimination, benefits, injuries, and illness seen among US laborers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23112DOI Listing

Authors' response to "malignant mesothelioma following exposure to cosmetic talc: Association, not causation".

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jul 16;63(7):651-652. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Department of Medicine (Pulmonary/Critical Care), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23114DOI Listing

Nontransient third-degree heart block and persistent respiratory findings as sequelae of acute occupational exposure to pyrethroids insecticide.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jul 16;63(7):644-648. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Occupational & Environmental Medicine of Long Island, Northwell Health and Occupational Medicine, New York, New York.

We present the case of a worker with occupational exposure to a pyrethroid insecticide who acutely developed nontransient third-degree heart block. In 2000, a 57-year-old male truck driver on his delivery route was accidentally exposed to pyrethroid insecticide being sprayed for West Nile virus containment. Both the driver and his vehicle were coated with the spray. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23111DOI Listing

Malignant mesothelioma following exposure to cosmetic talc: Association, not causation.

Authors:
Stanley J Geyer

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jul 16;63(7):649-650. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Geyer Pathology Services, L.L.C., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23113DOI Listing

Effort-reward imbalance at work and weight changes in a nationwide cohort of workers in Denmark.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jul 14;63(7):634-643. Epub 2020 Apr 14.

National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Objective: To investigate the relation between effort-reward imbalance (ERI) at work and subsequent weight changes.

Methods: We included participants from a population-based cohort of workers in Denmark (mean age = 47 years, 54% women) with two (n = 9005) or three repeated measurements (n = 5710). We investigated the association between (a) ERI (ie, the mismatch between high efforts spent and low rewards received at work) at baseline and weight changes after a 2-year follow-up (defined as ≥5% increase or decrease in body mass index (BMI) vs stable), and (b) onset and remission of ERI and subsequent changes in BMI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23110DOI Listing

Estimation of the number of workers exposed to respirable crystalline silica by industry: Analysis of OSHA compliance data (1979-2015).

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jun 9;63(6):465-477. Epub 2020 Apr 9.

Respiratory Health Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morgantown, West Virginia.

Background: Respirable crystalline silica (RCS) can potentially cause silicosis, lung cancer, and renal failure. The current study estimates the percentages of workers potentially overexposed to concentrations of RCS dust and silicosis proportional mortality rates (PMRs) by industry.

Methods: Occupational Safety and Health Administration compliance inspection sampling data for RCS collected during 1979 to 2015 were used to estimate percentages of workers exposed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23109DOI Listing

The estimated prevalence of exposure to carcinogens, asthmagens, and ototoxic agents among healthcare workers in Australia.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jul 31;63(7):624-633. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

School of Public Health, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia.

Background: Healthcare workers are occupationally exposed to various hazardous chemicals and agents that can potentially result in long-term adverse health effects. These exposures have not been comprehensively examined at a population level. The aim of this study was to examine occupational exposures to a wide range of asthmagens, carcinogens, and ototoxic agents among healthcare workers in Australia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23108DOI Listing

A scoping review to identify strategies that work to prevent four important occupational diseases.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jun 29;63(6):490-516. Epub 2020 Mar 29.

SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research, Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada.

Background: Despite being largely preventable, many occupational diseases continue to be highly prevalent and extremely costly. Effective strategies are required to reduce their human, economic, and social impacts.

Methods: To better understand which approaches are most likely to lead to progress in preventing noise-related hearing loss, occupational contact dermatitis, occupational cancers, and occupational asthma, we undertook a scoping review and consulted with a number of key informants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23107DOI Listing
June 2020
1.590 Impact Factor

Occupational noise exposure and asymmetric hearing loss: Results from the HUNT population study in Norway.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jun 18;63(6):535-542. Epub 2020 Mar 18.

Department of Chronic Diseases and Ageing, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.

Background: A large population study with adequate data on confounders is required to determine whether asymmetric hearing loss (AHL) is associated with occupational noise exposure.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional population study in Norway (the Health Investigation in Nord-Trøndelag: HUNT) with 24 183 participants, using pure-tone audiometry and questionnaires. AHL was defined as a difference in hearing threshold between the right and left ears of greater than or equal to 15 dB for the pure-tone average of 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23105DOI Listing

Malignant mesothelioma following repeated exposures to cosmetic talc: A case series of 75 patients.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jun 16;63(6):484-489. Epub 2020 Mar 16.

Department of Medicine (Pulmonary/Critical Care), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: Asbestos is the primary known cause of malignant mesothelioma. Some cosmetic talc products have been shown to contain asbestos. Recently, repeated exposures to cosmetic talc have been implicated as a cause of mesothelioma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23106DOI Listing

Factors associated with physical injury or police involvement during incidents of workplace violence in hospitals: Findings from the first year of California's new standard.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jun 12;63(6):543-549. Epub 2020 Mar 12.

Department of Community Health Systems, School of Nursing, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

Background: Workplace violence in healthcare settings is known to be a costly and often underreported problem. In California, hospitals are required to report incidents of violence towards workers to the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (CalOSHA) using an online reporting system that went into effect in 2017.

Methods: Reports submitted to CalOSHA from July 2017 to September 2018 pursuant to this new requirement were analyzed using descriptive methods and logistic regression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23103DOI Listing

Occupational differences in workers' compensation indemnity claims among direct care workers in Minnesota nursing homes, 2005-2016.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jun 13;63(6):517-526. Epub 2020 Mar 13.

Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota.

Background: Nursing assistants have one of the highest injury rates in the U.S., but few population-based studies assess differential injury risk by occupation in nursing homes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23102DOI Listing

Workplace indoor environmental quality and asthma-related outcomes in healthcare workers.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 10;63(5):417-428. Epub 2020 Mar 10.

Respiratory Health Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Morgantown, West Virginia.

Background: Asthma-related health outcomes are known to be associated with indoor moisture and renovations. The objective of this study was to estimate the frequency of these indoor environmental quality (IEQ) factors in healthcare facilities and their association with asthma-related outcomes among workers.

Methods: New York City healthcare workers (n = 2030) were surveyed regarding asthma-related symptoms, and moisture and renovation factors at work and at home during the last 12 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23101DOI Listing

Estimating the prevalence and spatial clusters of coal workers' pneumoconiosis cases using medicare claims data, 2011-2014.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jun 9;63(6):478-483. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

Department of Public Health Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina.

Background: Workers employed in the coal mining sector are at increased risk of respiratory diseases, including coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). We investigated the prevalence of CWP and its association with sociodemographic factors among Medicare beneficiaries.

Methods: We used 5% Medicare Limited Data Set claims data from 2011 to 2014 to select Medicare beneficiaries with a diagnosis of ICD-9-CM 500 (CWP). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23104DOI Listing

Assessing the accuracy of the death certificate injury at work box for identifying fatal occupational injuries in Michigan.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jun 7;63(6):527-534. Epub 2020 Mar 7.

Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan.

Background: Death certificates contain a box labeled "Injury at Work" which is to be marked "Yes" for all fatal occupational injuries. The accuracy of this box in Michigan is not fully characterized.

Methods: The accuracy of the Injury at Work box on the Michigan death certificate was compared to deaths identified from 2001 through 2016 by the Michigan Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation multi-source surveillance system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23100DOI Listing

Occupational risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders among railroad maintenance-of-way workers.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 7;63(5):402-416. Epub 2020 Mar 7.

State University of New York (SUNY)-Downstate Health Sciences University, Brooklyn, New York.

Background: Our objective was to examine occupational risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders of the neck, back, and knee among railroad maintenance-of-way (MOW) workers.

Methods: Four thousand eight-hundred sixteen active, retired, and disabled members of the Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employes Division (BMWED) completed a survey. We computed adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) using Poisson regression for neck, back, and knee musculoskeletal symptoms by work exposures, adjusted for age, region, race/ethnicity, smoking, and potential second job and spare time vehicle vibration exposure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23099DOI Listing
May 2020
1.590 Impact Factor

The management of embedded metal fragment patients and the role of chelation Therapy: A workshop of the Department of Veterans Affairs-Walter Reed National Medical Center.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 7;63(5):381-393. Epub 2020 Mar 7.

Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center Baltimore and Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Exposure to retained metal fragments from war-related injuries can result in increased systemic metal concentrations, thereby posing potential health risks to target organs far from the site of injury. Given the large number of veterans who have retained fragments and the lack of clear guidance on how to medically manage these individuals, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) convened a meeting of chelation experts and clinicians who care for embedded fragment patients to discuss current practices and provide medical management guidance. Based on this group's clinical expertise and review of published literature, the evidence presented suggests that, at least in the case of lead fragments, short-term chelation therapy may be beneficial for embedded fragment patients experiencing acute symptoms associated with metal toxicity; however, in the absence of clinical symptoms or significantly elevated blood lead concentrations (greater than 80 µg/dL), chelation therapy may offer little to no benefit for individuals with retained fragments and pose greater risks due to remobilization of metals stored in bone and other soft tissues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23098DOI Listing

Occupational exposure to manganese and risk of creatine kinase and creatine kinase-MB elevation among ferromanganese refinery workers.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 29;63(5):394-401. Epub 2020 Feb 29.

Department of Occupational Health and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi, China.

Background: Elevated exposure to manganese (Mn) could induce cardiovascular dysfunction. However, limited research is available on the effects of occupational Mn exposure on myocardial enzymes. We aimed to evaluate the relationships between Mn exposure and myocardial enzyme elevation among Mn-exposed workers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23097DOI Listing

A clinical evaluation and tissue fiber burden analysis of a lifetime resident of Libby, Montana with adenocarcinoma of the lung.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 18;63(5):456-462. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Center for Asbestos Related Disease, Libby, Montana.

Introduction: Vermiculite mining operations near Libby, Montana were active from the 1920s to 1990. Rail facilities for shipment of the mined material as well as some vermiculite processing activities were ongoing within the community of Libby. A fibrous component within the mined material has been associated with asbestos-related diseases in vermiculite miners and in the local citizens of the community. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23096DOI Listing

Prevalence of type II workplace violence among home healthcare workers: A meta-analysis.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 12;63(5):442-455. Epub 2020 Feb 12.

Schools of Nursing and Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland.

Background: Home healthcare workers (HHWs) provide medical and nonmedical services to home-bound patients. They are at great risk of experiencing violence perpetrated by patients (type II violence). Establishing the reliable prevalence of such violence and identifying vulnerable subgroups are essential in enhancing HHWs' safety. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23095DOI Listing

Examining the impact of occupational health and safety vulnerability on injury claim reporting in three Canadian provinces.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 3;63(5):435-441. Epub 2020 Feb 3.

Institute for Work and Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Introduction: The workers' compensation system covers wages and health care costs associated with work-related injuries or illnesses. We explore if dimensions of occupational health and safety vulnerability are associated with differences in reporting work-related injuries to workers' compensation boards (WCBs).

Methods: We examined data from adults reporting physical workplace injuries requiring time off or health care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23094DOI Listing

Occupational exposure to formaldehyde and risk of lung cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Apr 30;63(4):312-327. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Republic of Korea.

Background: Formaldehyde exposure is associated with nasopharyngeal cancer and leukemia. Previously-described links between formaldehyde exposure and lung cancer have been weak and inconsistent. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate quantitatively the association between formaldehyde exposure and lung cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23093DOI Listing

Heat related illness among workers in Washington State: A descriptive study using workers' compensation claims, 2006-2017.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Apr 28;63(4):300-311. Epub 2020 Jan 28.

School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Background: Heat related illness (HRI) places a significant burden on the health and safety of working populations and its impacts will likely increase with climate change. The aim of this study was to characterize the demographic and occupational characteristics of Washington workers who suffered from HRI from 2006 to 2017 using workers' compensation claims data.

Methods: We used Washington workers' compensation data linked to weather station data to identify cases of work-related HRI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23092DOI Listing

Development and application of a noise-hazard scheme for road maintainers.

Am J Ind Med 2020 May 18;63(5):429-434. Epub 2020 Jan 18.

Department of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: Transportation road maintenance and repair workers, or "maintainers," are exposed to hazardous and variable noise levels and often rely on hearing protection devices (HPD) to reduce noise-exposure levels. We aimed to improve upon HPD use as part of the HearWell program that used a Total Worker Health, participatory approach to hearing conservation.

Methods: Full-shift, personal noise sampling was performed during the routine task of brush cutting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23091DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7124968PMC

Inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers induced by silica exposure in crystal craftsmen.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Apr 18;63(4):337-347. Epub 2020 Jan 18.

Laboratory of Immunobiology of Inflammation/DECBI, Federal University of Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto, Brazil.

Background: Identification of biomarkers associated with the diagnosis and prognosis of silicosis would be highly advantageous in the clinical setting. The aim of this study is to evaluate inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers in subjects exposed to silica.

Methods: A cross-sectional study of crystal craftsmen currently (n = 34) or formerly (n = 35) exposed and a group of nonexposed subjects (n = 12) was performed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23088DOI Listing

Full employment history of Danish firefighters potentially involving additional exposures, 1964-2015.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Apr 18;63(4):328-336. Epub 2020 Jan 18.

Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: This study aimed to demonstrate the possibility of using data on full employment history to describe occupational patterns of Danish firefighters that may indicate additional hazards encountered by these workers.

Methods: An established cohort of Danish full-time and part-time/volunteer firefighters was used in the study (N = 9952) as well as occupational history covering the period 1964-2015, which was retrieved from a nationwide pension fund with compulsory membership. The most frequently held employments other than firefighting, together with temporal patterns of these employments, were explored in descriptive analyses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23089DOI Listing

A semi-quantitative job exposure matrix for dust exposures in Swedish soft tissue paper mills.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Apr 18;63(4):359-367. Epub 2020 Jan 18.

Section of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Background: Total paper dust exposure has been associated with respiratory problems among workers in the soft tissue paper industry. However, a comprehensive job exposure matrix (JEM) has not been developed for application to this industry. Our study was intended to address this need and to support further studies of mortality and morbidity in a cohort of Swedish workers from this industry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23090DOI Listing

Cancer risk among career male and female Florida firefighters: Evidence from the Florida Firefighter Cancer Registry (1981-2014).

Am J Ind Med 2020 Apr 12;63(4):285-299. Epub 2020 Jan 12.

Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida.

Background: Firefighters are at increased risk for select cancers. However, many studies are limited by relatively small samples, with virtually no data on the cancer experience of female firefighters. This study examines cancer risk in over 100,000 career Florida firefighters including 5000 + females assessed over a 34-year period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23086DOI Listing

Associations of alternative operationalizations of job strain with health and well-being outcomes in the same multioccupational worker sample.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Jun 10;63(6):550-559. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

Prax Consulting, Medellín, Colombia.

Objectives: The main goal of this study was to evaluate, in a large, occupationally diverse sample of Colombian workers, the association between alternative methods of operationalizing job strain and various health and well-being measures using the original Job Content Instrument (Job Content Questionnaire). We examine whether the specific way job strain is operationalized can explains differing variance in the outcomes.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using self-report instruments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23087DOI Listing

Solidarity and disparity: Declining labor union density and changing racial and educational mortality inequities in the United States.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Mar 17;63(3):218-231. Epub 2019 Dec 17.

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Background: Recently, United States life expectancy has stagnated or declined for the poor and working class and risen for the middle and upper classes. Declining labor-union density-the percent of workers who are unionized-has precipitated burgeoning income inequity. We examined whether it has also exacerbated racial and educational mortality inequities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23081DOI Listing

Current work hours and coronary artery calcification (CAC): The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

Am J Ind Med 2020 Apr 17;63(4):348-358. Epub 2019 Dec 17.

Bioanalytics Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia.

Background: Long work hours may be associated with adverse outcomes, including cardiovascular disease. We investigated cross-sectional associations of current work hours with coronary artery calcification (CAC).

Methods: Participants (n = 3046; 54. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23084DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7054127PMC

Increased overall and cause-specific mortality associated with disability among workers' compensation claimants with low back injuries.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Mar 13;63(3):209-217. Epub 2019 Dec 13.

Field Research Branch, Division of Field Studies and Engineering, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Background: Mortality tends to be higher among people who do not work than among workers, but the impact of work-related disability on mortality has not been well studied.

Methods: The vital status through 2015 was ascertained for 14 219 workers with an accepted workers' compensation claim in West Virginia for a low back injury in 1998 or 1999. Mortality among the cohort compared with the West Virginia general population was assessed using standard life table techniques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23083DOI Listing

"That's not my job": A mixed methods study of challenging client behaviors, boundaries, and home care aide occupational safety and health.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Apr 13;63(4):368-378. Epub 2019 Dec 13.

Department of Public Health, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts.

Introduction: Home care (HC) aide is among the fastest-growing jobs. Aides often work in long-term care relationships with elders or people with disabilities in clients' homes, assisting with daily activities. The purpose of this mixed-methods paper is to elucidate aides' experiences around the boundary-challenging behaviors of clients asking for services beyond aides' job duties and to identify possible interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23082DOI Listing

Industrial exoskeletons: Need for intervention effectiveness research.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Mar 11;63(3):201-208. Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, District of Columbia.

Exoskeleton devices are being introduced across several industry sectors to augment, amplify, or reinforce the performance of a worker's existing body components-primarily the lower back and the upper extremity. Industrial exoskeletons may play a role in reducing work-related musculoskeletal disorders arising from lifting and handling heavy materials or from supporting heavy tools in overhead work. However, wearing an exoskeleton may pose a number of risks that are currently not well-studied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23080DOI Listing

Night shift work and cardiovascular disease biomarkers in female nurses.

Am J Ind Med 2020 Mar 11;63(3):240-248. Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: Night shift work is associated with cardiovascular disease, but its associations with cardiovascular disease biomarkers are unclear. We investigated these associations in a study of female nurses.

Methods: We used data from the Nurses' Health Study II for total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23079DOI Listing

Mortality and mesothelioma incidence among chrysotile asbestos miners in Balangero, Italy: A cohort study.

Am J Ind Med 2020 02 14;63(2):135-145. Epub 2019 Nov 14.

Unit of Medical Statistics and Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Translational Medicine, University of Eastern Piedmont and CPO Piemonte, Novara, Italy.

Background: We studied cancer mortality and mesothelioma incidence in 974 male workers employed at least 6 months at the Balangero mine (Italy), the largest chrysotile mine in Western Europe, active from 1917 to 1985.

Methods: Vital status as of 31 May 2013, causes of deaths and mesothelioma incidence from 1990 were ascertained. Past exposure to asbestos by working area and calendar period was estimated, based on historical data of fibers concentrations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23071DOI Listing
February 2020