6 results match your criteria American journal of gastroenterology supplements Print[Journal]

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Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction: epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and initial therapeutic approach.

Am J Gastroenterol Suppl 2014 Sep;2(1):31-7

Nevada Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

Opioids affect motor and sensory function throughout the gastrointestinal tract, and are frequently associated with a number of gastrointestinal symptoms including constipation, which impairs the quality of life and may limit the dose of opioid or result in discontinuation altogether. Patients with opioid-induced constipation should be assessed by careful history and physical examination, and in some cases where the diagnosis is unclear with select diagnostic tests. Few clinical studies have been conducted to assess the efficacy of various treatments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajgsup.2014.7DOI Listing
September 2014
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The narcotic bowel syndrome: a recent update.

Am J Gastroenterol Suppl 2014 Sep;2(1):22-30

1] Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA [2] Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

Objectives: The paradoxical development of chronic abdominal pain is an underrecognized side effect of opioid use. Narcotic bowel syndrome (NBS), occurring in a small proportion of chronic opioid users, consists of chronic or intermittent abdominal pain, which often increases in severity despite continued or escalating dosages of opioids prescribed to relieve pain.

Methods: A PubMed search was conducted using terms such as "narcotic bowel syndrome" and "opioid hyperalgesia" through January 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajgsup.2014.6DOI Listing
September 2014
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Molecular physiology of enteric opioid receptors.

Am J Gastroenterol Suppl 2014 Sep;2(1):17-21

Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA.

Opioid drugs have powerful antidiarrheal effects and many patients taking these drugs for chronic pain relief experience chronic constipation that can progress to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. Three classes of opioid receptors are expressed by enteric neurons: μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, and KOR). MOR and DOR couple to inhibition of adenylate cylase and nerve terminal Ca(2+) channels and activation of K(+) channels. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/ajgsup20145
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajgsup.2014.5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4426191PMC
September 2014
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The use of opioid analgesics for chronic pain: minimizing the risk for harm.

Am J Gastroenterol Suppl 2014 Sep;2(1):3-8

Department of Anesthesiology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Chronic noncancer pain is common and consequential, affecting ∼100 million people in the United States alone and costing, when direct and indirect costs are combined, in excess of $635 billion. For certain individuals, opioids may be an effective option for the management of chronic pain; however, a series of critical decisions must be made before prescribing opioids to ensure that their potential benefits and possible risks are appropriately and realistically addressed. A thorough history, physical examination, and appropriate testing, including an assessment of risk for substance abuse, misuse, or addiction, should be conducted in patients who are being considered for opioid therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajgsup.2014.3DOI Listing
September 2014

Introduction: opioid-induced constipation.

Authors:
Anthony J Lembo

Am J Gastroenterol Suppl 2014 Sep;2(1)

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajgsup.2014.2DOI Listing
September 2014
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Continuing medical education: september 2014.

Authors:

Am J Gastroenterol Suppl 2014 Sep;2(1)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajgsup.2014.1DOI Listing
September 2014
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