14,619 results match your criteria American journal of epidemiology[Journal]


Racial Capitalism within Public Health: How Occupational Settings Drive COVID-19 Disparities.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jul 3. Epub 2020 Jul 3.

Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Epidemiology of the U.S. COVID-19 outbreak focuses on individuals' biology and behaviors, despite centrality of occupational environments in the viral spread. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa126DOI Listing

Field Study of the Possible Effect of Parental Irradiation on the Germline of Children Born to Cleanup Workers and Evacuees of the Chornobyl Accident.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jul 2. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Although transgenerational effects of ionizing radiation exposure have long been a concern, human research to date has been confined to studies of disease phenotype in groups exposed to high dose and high dose rates, such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Transgenerational effects of parental irradiation can be addressed using powerful new genomic technologies. In collaboration with the National Research Center for Radiation Medicine (NRCRM) Ukraine, the US National Cancer Institute, in 2014-2018, conducted a genomic alterations study among children born in selected regions in Ukraine post Chornobyl accident to cleanup workers and/or evacuees exposed to low dose rate radiation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa095DOI Listing

Methodological Issues in Population-Based Studies of Multigenerational Associations.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jul 1. Epub 2020 Jul 1.

Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Laboratory-based animal research has revealed a number of exposures with multigenerational effects-ones that affect the children and grandchildren of those directly exposed. An important task for epidemiology is to investigate these relationships in human populations. Without the relative control achieved in laboratory settings, however, population-based studies of multigenerational associations have had to use a broader range of study designs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa125DOI Listing

2019 Articles of the Year, Reviewers of the Year, and Figure of the Year.

Authors:

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jul 1. Epub 2020 Jul 1.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa094DOI Listing

Beyond Diversity: Focusing on and enhancing inclusion in the Society for Epidemiologic Research (SER).

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Division of Epidemiology & Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Increasing diversity and inclusion among organizational membership has become a focus for many professional societies, including the Society for Epidemiologic Research (SER). The accompanying article by DeVilbiss et al. assessed dimensions of diversity and inclusion within SER to provide baseline data for future evaluations of Society initiatives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa111DOI Listing

Recommendations for the Society for Epidemiologic Research to Further Promote Diversity and Inclusion at the Annual Meeting and Beyond.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

Increasing diverse engagement in the Society of Epidemiologic Research (SER) will positively impact the field of epidemiology. SER has long been a pioneer in promoting diversity and inclusion as the largest and longest running epidemiologic society in North America. A recent survey of SER members, however, showed there is still room for improving diversity, inclusion, representation, and participation in the Society. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa110DOI Listing

Diversity and Inclusion in the Epidemiology Workforce, a Response to DeVilbiss et al.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Boston University, Slone Epidemiology Center, Boston, MA.

Increasing participation by promoting diversity and inclusion in professional society membership has become an important topic for many scientific fields. In a recent issue of AJE, DeVilbiss et al reported results from a survey conducted by the SER Diversity and Inclusion Committee in which they measured several aspects of participation by sociodemographic and cultural variables among its members, Here, we summarize the major findings of their survey, put their results within the greater context of the epidemiology workforce, and provide suggestions on how the committee could expand its influence by considering measuring variables related to career outcomes and trajectories. This suggestion is based on an attempt to link the interventions being facilitated by SER, the participation indices it is trying to improve, and the greater mission of the SER to build sustainable career trajectories that produce the best science that will improve the health of human populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa105DOI Listing

Re: "Assessing Representation and Perceived Inclusion among Members in the Society for Epidemiologic Research".

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Molecular and Translational Sciences, Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso, El Paso, Texas, 5001 El Paso Drive, Texas 79905, United States.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa114DOI Listing

Response to SER Diversity and Inclusion Survey Commentaries.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Epidemiology Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6710B Rockledge Dr., MSC 7004, Bethesda, MD 20892, United States.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa103DOI Listing

Diversity and political leaning: Considerations for epidemiology.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Department of Population Health, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York, NY.

The positive effects of increased diversity and inclusion in scientific research and practice are well documented. In this issue, Devilbiss and colleagues (Am J Epidemiol. 2020) present findings from a survey that sought to characterize diversity among epidemiologists and perceptions of inclusion in the epidemiologic profession. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa102DOI Listing

A Diverse and Inclusive Academic Membership for All.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Barry Commoner Center for Health and the Environment, Queens College, City University of New York, Flushing, New York.

With the growing recognition that diversity and inclusion are essential for the improvement of science and innovation, this commentary provides some perspectives on three findings in the DeVilbiss et al. (2020)'s article and provide points of discussion on factors and strategies to consider when drafting diversity and inclusion programs for the Society for Epidemiologic Research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa112DOI Listing

In pursuit of consequential epidemiology: where is diversity and inclusion?

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington; Seattle, WA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa116DOI Listing

The Society for Epidemiologic Research (SER) and the Future of Diversity and Inclusion in Epidemiology1.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Boston College William F. Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts.

The mission of the Diversity and Inclusion Committee (D&I) in the Society for Epidemiologic Research is to foster the diversity of our membership and work towards the engagement of all members, from diverse backgrounds at all stages of their careers, in the Society's activities, with the intent of enhancing discovery in public health. As a foundational step in implementing our mission, the D&I committee conducted a survey of SER membership. In our commentary, we report on the efforts we have undertaken to expand the diversity and inclusiveness of our Society and our aspirations for future efforts in support of D&I. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa109DOI Listing

Letter to editor: challenges in evaluating diversity and inclusion in scientific communities.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Mid-Atlantic Permanente Research Institute, Rockville, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa115DOI Listing

You're From... Where, Again? A Critical Assessment of Institutional Diversity in the Society for Epidemiologic Research.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

School of Public Health, Oregon Health & Science University-Portland State University.

The Society for Epidemiologic Research (SER) has recently taken laudable steps towards increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion within the society, including participation in the Annual Meeting. In this essay, we argue that there is one critical piece of the diversity and inclusion equation that is, however, overlooked: institution. At the 2019 Annual Meeting, a mere 8 institutions accounted for a disproportionate number of both oral concurrent sessions and symposium speakers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa106DOI Listing

A Smorgasbord of Opportunities Exist to Improve Diversity, Inclusion, Representation, and Participation in Epidemiology: More Informed Action is Necessary Since Current Approaches are Insufficient.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina; Intramural Program, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland.

The authors of the DeVilbiss et al. manuscript have taken on the noble and worthy cause to improve diversity, inclusion, representation, and participation across the Society for Epidemiologic Research (SER) membership - a reflection/microcosm of society. The objective of this commentary is to underscore the importance of diversity and to offer initiative ideas, which should be centered around inequity stemming from the widespread historical and contemporary maldistribution of power (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa104DOI Listing

Diversity, (Equity) and inclusion: Easily ignored issues in academia.

Authors:
Nnaemeka U Odo

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Health Sciences Practice Exponent, Inc. 475 14th Street, Ste. 400, Oakland, California, CA 94612.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa113DOI Listing

"Epidemiologists Count": The Role of Diversity and Inclusion in the Field of Epidemiology.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Department of Population Health and Disease Prevention, UCI Program in Public Health, Irvine, California.

We present interpretations of the idea that "epidemiologists count" in response to the current status of membership and diversity and inclusion efforts within the Society for Epidemiological Research (SER). We review who epidemiologists count to describe the (mis)representation of SER membership and how categorizations of people reflect social constructions of identity and biases that exist in broader society. We argue that what epidemiologists count - how diversity and inclusion are operationalized - has real-world implications on institutional norms and how inclusive/non-inclusive environments are. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa108DOI Listing

Improving Diversity and Promoting Inclusion in the Society for Epidemiologic Research Through Choice of Conference Location.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

Scientific conferences provide attendees opportunities to network, share research, learn new skills and ideas, and initiate collaborations. Conference attendance is especially important for students and early career researchers who are establishing their research careers or looking for jobs. However, attending conferences can be expensive, and the high cost of conference attendance may hit students and early career researchers the hardest. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa107DOI Listing

When Is a Complete Case Approach to Missing Data Valid? The Importance of Effect Measure Modification.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

When estimating causal effects, careful handling of missing data is needed to avoid bias. Complete case analysis is commonly used in epidemiologic analyses. Previous work has shown that covariate-stratified effect estimates from complete case analysis are unbiased when missingness is independent of the outcome conditional on the exposure and covariates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa124DOI Listing

Assessing Epidemic Trend in Real Time with a Simple Ratio Plot.

Authors:
Xinhua Yu

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 29. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Division of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Environmental Health. School of Public Health, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa123DOI Listing

On the causal interpretation of rate-change methods: the prior event rate ratio and rate difference.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 29. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Center for Evidence Synthesis in Health, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.

A growing number of studies use data before and after treatment initiation in groups exposed to different treatment strategies to estimate "causal effects" using a ratio measure called the prior event rate ratio (PERR). Here, we offer a causal interpretation for PERR and its additive scale analog, the prior event rate difference (PERD). We show that causal interpretation of these measures requires untestable rate-change assumptions about the relationship between (1) the change of the counterfactual ratebefore and after treatment initiation in the treated group under hypothetical intervention to implement the control treatment; and (2) the change of the factual rate before and after treatment initiation in the control group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa122DOI Listing

Methods for Estimating the Effect of Minimum Wages on Health Should Target Policy-Relevant Parameters.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 23. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, and Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa117DOI Listing

Response to Methods for Estimating the Effect of Minimum Wages on Health Should Target Policy-Relevant Parameters.

Authors:
J Paul Leigh

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 23. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis One Shields Ave UC Davis, Davis, California. 95616 Office phone: 530 754 8605.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa118DOI Listing

Re: "Invited Commentary: The Disillusionment of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Epidemiology".

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 22. Epub 2020 Jun 22.

King's College London, Department of Women and Children's Health Sciences Centre London, London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa100DOI Listing

Reply to Inskip et al.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 22. Epub 2020 Jun 22.

Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa101DOI Listing

Causal Effects of Air Pollution on Mortality in Massachusetts.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 19. Epub 2020 Jun 19.

Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Air pollution epidemiology studies have primarily investigated long- and short-term exposures separately, have used multiplicative models, and have been associational studies. Implementing a generalized propensity score adjustment approach with 3.8 billion person-days of follow-up, we simultaneously assessed causal associations of long- (one-year moving average) and short-term (two-day moving average) PM2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa098DOI Listing

Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Uterine Leiomyomata: A Prospective Ultrasound Study.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 17. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Uterine leiomyomata (UL) are associated with severe reproductive morbidity and are the primary indication for hysterectomy in the United States. A recent prospective cohort study of Black women reported positive associations between intakes of marine-sourced omega-3 fatty acids and UL risk. We examined whether intakes of dietary fat were associated with UL incidence in a 5-year prospective study of premenopausal Black women living in Detroit who underwent serial ultrasound. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa097DOI Listing

Models to Assess the Association of a Semi-Quantitative Exposure With Outcomes.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 18. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

The Biostatistics Center, Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Rockville, MD.

A semi-quantitative risk factor has two components: any exposure (yes/no) and the quantitative amount of exposure (if exposed). We describe the statistical properties of alternate analyses with such a risk factor using linear, logistic or Cox proportional hazards models. Often analyses employ the amount exposed as a single quantitative covariate, including the non-exposed with value zero. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa071DOI Listing

Male Use of Pain Medication and Fecundability.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 3. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pain reliever use has been associated with both lower and higher risks of adverse reproductive outcomes in animals. The sole investigation of male pain reliever use and fertility in humans reported a 35% reduction in fecundability among men with urinary acetaminophen concentrations in the highest (>73.5 ng/ml) vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa096DOI Listing

Biomarkers for mortality among individuals with a history of out-of-home care: Implications for study design and conceptualizations of risk.

Authors:
Hilary K Brown

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 1. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Interdisciplinary Centre for Health & Society, University of Toronto Scarborough; 1265 Military Trail; Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Out-of-home care in childhood and adolescence has been shown to be associated with elevated risk for all-cause mortality in adulthood, with adverse socioeconomic, psychosocial, and health-related trajectories hypothesized to mediate this relationship. In the research letter by Batty and Hamer (Am J Epidemiol. XXXX;XXX(XX):XXXX-XXXX), the authors used data from the 1970 British birth cohort (n=8,581) to examine risk of biomarkers for mortality in adults with a history of out-of-home care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa077DOI Listing

Public care during childhood and biomedical risk factors in middle-age: the 1970 birth cohort study.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 Jun 1. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Institute of Sport, Exercise & Health, Division of Surgery & Interventional Science, University College London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa079DOI Listing

A Prospective Cohort Study to Evaluate the Impact of Diet, Exercise, and Lifestyle on Fertility (IDEAL): Design and Baseline Characteristics.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 30. Epub 2020 May 30.

The Emmes Company LLC, Rockville, Maryland.

Diet, lifestyle, and psychosocial factors may influence fertility for men and women, though evidence is mixed, and couple-based approaches are needed for assessing associations with reproductive outcomes. The Impact of Diet, Exercise, and Lifestyle on Fertility (IDEAL) study is a prospective cohort with contemporaneous detailed follow-up of female partners of men enrolled in the Folic Acid and Zinc Supplementation Trial studying couples seeking infertility treatment (2016-2019). Follow-up of men continued for 6 months, while female partners were followed for 9 months while attempting pregnancy and throughout any resulting pregnancy (up to 18 months). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa073DOI Listing

Using cure models to estimate the serial interval of tuberculosis with limited follow-up.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 27. Epub 2020 May 27.

Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Defined as the time between symptom onset of an infector and infectee pair, serial interval (SI) is commonly used to understand infectious diseases transmission. Slow progression to active disease, as well as the small percentage of individuals who will eventually develop active disease, complicate the estimation of the serial interval for tuberculosis (TB). In this paper, we showed via simulation studies that when there is credible information on the percentage of those who will develop TB disease following infection, a cure model, first introduced by Boag in 1949, should be used to estimate the SI for TB. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa090DOI Listing

Longitudinal mediation analysis using natural effect models.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 27. Epub 2020 May 27.

Department of Applied Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics, Gent University, Krijslaan 281, Gent , Belgium, and Department of Medical Statistics, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

Mediation analysis is concerned with the decomposition of the total effect of an exposure on an outcome into the indirect effect through a given mediator, and the remaining direct effect. This is ideally done using longitudinal measurements of the mediator, as these capture the mediator process more finely. However, longitudinal measurements pose challenges for mediation analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa092DOI Listing

Early Outpatient Treatment of Symptomatic, High-Risk Covid-19 Patients that Should be Ramped-Up Immediately as Key to the Pandemic Crisis.

Authors:
Harvey A Risch

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 27. Epub 2020 May 27.

Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut.

More than 1.6 million Americans have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 and >10 times that number carry antibodies to it. High-risk patients presenting with progressing symptomatic disease have only hospitalization treatment with its high mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa093DOI Listing

Acculturation, Cognitive Performance and Decline, and Incident Dementia/CIND: The Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 22. Epub 2020 May 22.

Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

US Latinos, a growing, aging population, are disproportionately burdened by cognitive decline and dementia. Modifiable risk factors are needed for interventions aimed at reducing risk. Broad sociocultural context may illuminate complex etiology among culturally diverse Latinos. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa088DOI Listing
May 2020
5.230 Impact Factor

Occupational noise exposure and vestibular schwannoma: A case-control study in Sweden.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 22. Epub 2020 May 22.

National Institute of Occupational Health, Department of Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology, Oslo, Norway.

It has been suggested that the association between self-reported occupational noise exposure and vestibular schwannoma (VS) found in several studies, represents recall bias. Therefore, we aim to study the relation in a large case-control study using occupational noise measurements. We performed a case-control study from Sweden of 1913 VS cases diagnosed in 1961-2009 and 9566 age- and sex-matched population controls. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa091DOI Listing

Evaluating A Key Instrumental Variable Assumption Using Randomization Tests.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 20. Epub 2020 May 20.

Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Instrumental variable (IV) analyses are becoming common in health services research and epidemiology. Most IV analyses use naturally occurring instruments, such as distance to a hospital. In these analyses, investigators must assume the instrument is as-if randomly assigned. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa089DOI Listing

The peril of power: a tutorial on using simulation to better understand when and how we can estimate mediating effects.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 16. Epub 2020 May 16.

Departments of Mental Health, Biostatistics, and Health Policy and Management, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa083DOI Listing

Reply to VanderWeele.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 16. Epub 2020 May 16.

Departments of Mental Health, Biostatistics, and Health Policy and Management, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa082DOI Listing

Temporal Confounding in the Test Negative Design.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 16. Epub 2020 May 16.

Department of Biostatistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

In the test negative design, routine testing at healthcare facilities is leveraged to estimate the effectiveness of an intervention such as a vaccine. The odds of vaccination for individuals who test positive for a target pathogen is compared to the odds of vaccination for individuals who test negative for that pathogen, adjusting for key confounders. The design is rapidly growing in popularity, but many open questions remain about its properties. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa084DOI Listing

Frontiers of Power Assessment in Mediation Analysis.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 16. Epub 2020 May 16.

Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Harvard University.

The development of tools for power and sample size calculations for mediation analysis has lagged far behind the development of methods. The paper by Rudolph et al. (1) is a helpful contribution in using simulations as a tool for power calculations for more complex methods and settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa081DOI Listing

Hidden Imputations and the Kaplan-Meier Estimator.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 15. Epub 2020 May 15.

Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa086DOI Listing

Multiple Types of Perceived Job Discrimination and Sleep Health among Working Women: Findings from the Sister Study.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 14. Epub 2020 May 14.

Intramural Program, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Job discrimination, a social stressor, may lead to sleep health disparities among workers; yet, limited research has examined this relationship and specific sources of job discrimination. We used a US sample of working women (n=26,085), participants of the Sister Study (2008-2016), to examine the associations of perceived job discrimination due to sex, race, age, health conditions, and/or sexual orientation with sleep health. Cross-sectionally, linear or logistic regression models revealed that each source of job discrimination was independently associated with different sleep problems after controlling for other sources of job discrimination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa075DOI Listing

Associations Between Community Social Capital and Preservation of Functional Capacity in the Aftermath of a Major Disaster.

Am J Epidemiol 2020 May 14. Epub 2020 May 14.

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

The strength of social connections in the community ("social capital") is hypothesized to be a crucial ingredient in disaster resilience. We examined whether community-level social capital is correlated with the ability to maintain functional capacity among older residents who experienced the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. The baseline of our cohort (mean age 74 years) was established in 2010, seven months before the disaster in Iwanuma, a Japanese city located 80-km from the epicenter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa085DOI Listing