422 results match your criteria American journal of disaster medicine[Journal]


Preparation and response to a targeted automobile ramming mass casualty (TARMAC) attack: An analysis of the 2017 Charlottesville, Virginia TARMAC attack.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Summer;14(3):219-223

Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia.

Targeted automobile ramming mass casualty (TARMAC) attacks have recently become a common modality for those wishing to inflict mass harm. Intentional vehicular ramming is a unique wounding mechanism and deserves special consideration. An emergency response case analysis of the 2017 TARMAC attack in Charlottesville was conducted to review preparedness and identify shortcomings at the University of Virginia Health System University Hospital. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0333DOI Listing

Blood transfusion preparedness for mass casualty incidents: Are we truly ready?

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Summer;14(3):201-218

Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma, UT Health, San Antonio, Texas.

Mass casualty incidents (MCI) are high profile contributors to the number of annual trauma-related deaths in the United States. A critical aspect of MCI care is the ability to provide blood components in sufficient types and quantities to prevent deaths due to hemorrhage. For transfusions to play an optimal role in the prevention of trauma-related hemorrhagic death, including MCI, there appears to be a very tight time window after injury to initiate transfusion therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0332DOI Listing

An integrative review of the limited evidence on international travel bans as an emerging infectious disease disaster control measure.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Summer;14(3):193-200

Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

In our increasingly interconnected world, the potential for emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) to spread globally is of paramount concern. Travel bans-herein defined as the complete restriction of travel from at least one geographic region to at least one other international geographic region-are a potential policy solution to control the global spread of disease. The social, economic, and health-related consequences of travel bans, as well as the available evidence on the effectiveness of travel restrictions in preventing the global spread of influenza, have been previously described. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0331DOI Listing

Hospital preparedness for disaster and mass casualty management in Pakistan: A cross-sectional evaluation study.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Summer;14(3):181-192

Team Leader, Country Emergency Preparedness and IHR WHO Health Emergency Program WHO Headquarter, Geneva, Switzerland.

Background: World Health Organization has advocated preemptive readiness of health systems to manage disas-trous events. Pakistan is known to be highly susceptible to disasters on the one hand and significantly lacking in coping ability on the other. Preparedness of health facilities in such locales is especially important, despite which there is little published evidence regarding hospitals' response capacity in Pakistan. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0330DOI Listing

Wound patterns in survivors of modern firearm related civilian Mass Casualty Incidents.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Summer;14(3):175-180

Director of Trauma Services, Broward Health Medical Center, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Background: Civilian mass shooting events (CMSE) are occurring with increased frequency. Unfortunately, our knowledge of how to respond to these events is largely based on military experience and medical examiner data. While this translational knowledge has improved our basic response to such events, it is critical that we have a better under-standing of the wound patterns observed and the resources utilized in civilian mass shootings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0329DOI Listing

The long-term consequences of 35 years of terror attacks against civilians in Israel: Medical and nonmedical costs, disability.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Summer;14(3):167-173

Office of Medical Affairs, National Insurance Institute of Israel (NII), Jerusalem, Israel.

Background: Terrorism is a major threat, which requires operative preparedness, principally for the emergency struc-tures. Similarly, its rising impact on the healthcare system should interest the researchers in health affairs and policy. The number and the nature of disabilities due to terror is insufficiently addressed in the civilian population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0328DOI Listing

Providing protection to patients with chronic respiratory diseases in a toxic industrial compound scenario.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Summer;14(3):157-165

Israel Defense Force Medical Corps Headquarters, Tel Hashomer, Ramat-Gan, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medi-cine, Geha Mental Health Center, Petach-Tikva, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel.

Background: In case of dispersion of toxic industrial compounds (TICs), patients with chronic respiratory diseases would be highly endangered, as they would be unable to use the standard-issue Chemical-Biological-Radio-Nuclear (CBRN) mask. Therefore, we defined guidelines to deliver the appropriate respiratory protection devices to this sub-population of patients.

Methods: We used the Israel Ministry of Health Registry to analyze and define chronic respiratory disease patients, both hospitalized and at home, according to their ventilatory and supportive needs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0327DOI Listing

Politicization of medical decision making.

Authors:
Matt Mihelic

Am J Disaster Med 2019 ;14(3):155

Department of Family Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0326DOI Listing

A review of CBRN topics related to military and civilian patient exposure and decontamination.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Spring;14(2):137-149

Colonel, Assistant Professor, Department of Systems Engineering and Management, Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio.

Chemical and biological (CB) warfare have long been practiced, and although these types of warfare are not acceptable in modern times, this does not prevent them from occurring. This makes it important for societies to be able to appropriately respond to these events, including the best way to decontaminate victims to keep them and emergency responders safe. Decontamination methods such as chemical, physical, wet, and dry methods are discussed, as well as their downsides. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0324DOI Listing
November 2019

Reaching vulnerable populations in the disaster-prone US Gulf Coast: Communicating across the crisis lifecycle.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Spring;14(2):121-136

Research Programmer, Research Programming Group, RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California.

Delivering risk and crisis communication to US Gulf Coast residents poses a unique challenge to individual and organizational responders. The region has endured several natural and man-made disasters, spanning Hurricane Katrina, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and more recently Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. In the future, the US Gulf Coast is expected to remain susceptible to a range of disasters. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0323DOI Listing
November 2019
1 Read

The effect of training and experience on mass casualty incident triage performance: Evidence from emergency personnel in a high complexity university hospital.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Spring;14(2):113-119

Emergency Physician, Universidad del Rosario, Fundación Santa fe de Bogotá, Bogota, Colombia.

Mass casualty incident (MCI) can occur at any time and place and health care institutions must be prepared to deal with these incidents. Emergency department staff rarely learn how to triage MCI patients during their medical or nurse degrees, or through on-the-job training. This study aims to evaluate the effect of training and experience on the MCI triage performance of emergency personnel. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0322DOI Listing
November 2019

Survey of medical center employees' willingness and availability to donate blood in support of a civilian warm fresh whole blood program.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Spring;14(2):101-111

Department of Trauma, Critical Care, and General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

Objectives: In military settings, utilizing warm fresh whole blood (WFWB) was associated with reduced mortality; however, there are multiple challenges for administering WFWB to civilians. The authors aimed to determine barriers to hospital employees emergently donating to civilian WFWB programs.

Methods: We surveyed hospital employee willingness to donate emergently, familiarity with blood donation, and queried baseline demographics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0321DOI Listing
November 2019

Using mind mapping technology for personal preparedness planning.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Spring;14(2):96-100

Faculty, Department of Emergency Medicine; Associate Director, Office of Critical Event Preparedness and Response (CEPAR), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

Objective: Organizing key information for personal disaster preparedness in an efficient and accessible format is critical to ensure practical utility. The authors examine the use of mind mapping technology to organize personal disaster preparedness information and explore the potential of mind mapping software as a tool to create individual and family preparedness resources.

Design: The general features of mind maps are considered and a sample family preparedness plan was created using TheBrain, a mind mapping software. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0320DOI Listing
November 2019

Real-time geotracking and cataloging of mass casualty incident markers in a search and rescue training simulation: Pilot study.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Spring;14(2):89-95

Department of Surgery, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, Missouri.

Objective: Search and rescue after mass casualty incidents relies on robust data infrastructure. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA's) Task Force 1 (TF1) trains its volunteers to locate and virtually tag scene incidents using a global positioning satellite (GPS) device programmed with markers for each incident (Iron Sights). The authors performed a pilot study comparing Iron Sights™ to a Wi-Fi-based real-time incident geolocation and virtual tagging dashboard (Panacea™) in creating a dynamic common operating picture. Read More

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http://www.wmpllc.org/ojs/index.php/ajdm/article/view/2642
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0319DOI Listing
November 2019
2 Reads

A tabletop school bus rollover: Connecticut-wide drills to build pediatric disaster preparedness and promote a novel hospital disaster readiness checklist.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Spring;14(2):75-87

Manager, Injury Prevention, Community Outreach, and Research, Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut.

Objective: To assess emergency medical services (EMS) and hospital disaster plans and communication and promote an integrated pediatric disaster response in the state of Connecticut, using tabletop exercises to promote education, collaboration, and planning among healthcare entities.

Design: Using hospital-specific and national guidelines, a disaster preparedness plan consisting of pediatric guidelines and a hospital checklist was created by The Connecticut Coalition for Pediatric Disaster Preparedness.

Setting: Five school bus rollover tabletop exercises were conducted, one in each of Connecticut's five EMS regions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0318DOI Listing
November 2019

The medical costs of terror: A review of the literature.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Winter;14(1):65-70

Office of Medical Affairs, National Insurance Institute of Israel, Jerusalem, Israel.

Context: The threat of terrorism is intensifying with a recent rise in the number of death and injuries. Nevertheless, few articles deal with the short and long-term medical costs of treating and assisting the civilian victims of terror. The objective of this article is to review the literature and describe the medical costs of supporting victims of terrorism. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0316DOI Listing
September 2019

Researching natural disaster preparedness through health behavioral change models.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Winter;14(1):51-63

Candidate, Institute for Social Science Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia.

There have been an increasing number of studies conducted on community preparedness, particularly on changing individual health behaviors in ways that minimizes individual risk to cope with the stress of a natural disaster. A variety of behavioral change theories and models used by disaster academics scrutinize the manner in which individual behavior is sought and transformed into disaster preparedness. This reflects the lack of knowledge about how these models identify certain behaviors regarding natural disaster preparation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0315DOI Listing
September 2019
3 Reads

A framework for integrating information resources for chemical emergency management and response.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Winter;14(1):33-49

Associate Director of Science, Division of Field Studies and Engineering, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Effective emergency management and response require appropriate utilization of various resources as an incident evolves. This manuscript describes the information resources used in chemical emergency management and operations and how their utility evolves from the initial response phase to recovery to event close out. The authors address chemical hazard guidance in the context of four different phases of emergency response: preparedness, emergency response (both initial and ongoing), recovery, and mitigation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0314DOI Listing
September 2019
7 Reads

Hospital Safety Index analysis in Fars Province hospitals, Iran, 2015-2016.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Winter;14(1):25-32

Associate Professor of Surgery, Senior University Lecturer in Surgery/Disaster Medicine, Unit of Security and Preparedness, Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Background And Objectives: Hospitals are the vital part of disaster management and their functionality should be maintained and secured. However, it can be the target of natural and man-made disasters. In Iran, Fars Province is prone to major incidents and disasters in its hospitals at any time during the course of a year. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0313DOI Listing
September 2019
1 Read

The effects of QuikClot Combat Gauze and Celox Rapid on hemorrhage control.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Winter;14(1):17-23

Nurse Anesthetist, Major, US Army Graduate Program in Anesthesia Nursing, US Army Nurse Corp, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas.

Objective: Compare QuikClot Combat Gauze (QCG) and Celox Rapid (CR) for initial hemostasis and over a 1-hour period.

Design: Experimental study.

Setting: Approved animal laboratory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0312DOI Listing
September 2019

Medical record keeping during a mass casualty incident: Development of a disaster medical record.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Winter;14(1):9-15

Department of Surgery, Major Incident Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Objective: Improve documentation during a mass casualty incident (MCI).

Design: This is a retrospective chart review.

Setting: This chart review was done in the Major Incident Hospital (MIH). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0311DOI Listing
September 2019
1 Read

The evolution of healthcare disaster preparedness and response training at the FEMA Center for Domestic Preparedness.

Am J Disaster Med 2019 Winter;14(1):5-8

Department of Emergency Management, Jacksonville State University, Jacksonville, Alabama.

The Center for Domestic Preparedness (CDP) in partnership with the US Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response is using a multiagency/organization, targeted, collaborative approach to adjust existing courses and develop responsive new courses to provide best practices education and experiential learning techniques in healthcare facility emergency resilience, preparedness, response, and recovery applicable to all first receivers. The CDP in Anniston, AL, is a Federal Emergency Management Agency training facility for the Nation's state, local, tribal, and territorial first responders and healthcare professionals. The Center's role has rapidly evolved to provide healthcare emergency preparedness, response, and management training. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2019.0310DOI Listing
September 2019
1 Read

Dentists: Critical aspects of their own and their community's disaster preparedness plan.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Fall;13(4):289-296

Morton Amsterdam Dean, Department of Preventative and Restorative Services, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The weather-related disasters in 2017 in Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico, the 2017-2018 wildfire seasons in California and Hurricanes Florence and Michael in 2018 have challenged all healthcare professionals, to have plans in place to protect their facility, patients, and staff from all possible hazards. These were "slowly developing" events, with enormous media coverage, and yet the results were still horrific. The need to have both a good evacuation plan and a good shelter-in-place plan has previously been dramatically demonstrated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0308DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

What and how are EM residents being taught to respond to the next disaster?

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Fall;13(4):279-287

Attending Physician, Department of Emergency Medicine, Madigan Army Medical Center; Adjunct Assistant Professor, Military and Emergency Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences; Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Washington Tacoma, Washington.

Objective: Disasters, both natural and man-made, have become commonplace and emergency physicians serve on the front line. Residency may be the only time that emergency physicians are exposed to a disaster, through training, until one happens in their department; therefore, it is critical to provide residents with appropriate and timely disaster education. The goal of this study was to assess the current status of disaster education in emergency medicine (EM) residencies in the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0307DOI Listing
April 2019
14 Reads

Associations of biological stress markers in hurricane survivors: Heartrate variability, Interleukin-2 and Interleukin-6 in depression and PTSD.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Fall;13(4):267-278

Fellow in Addictions Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts.

Objective: Inflammatory and immunologic cytokines and vagal activity have important roles in health and mental health, and may influence each other. The authors assessed relationships of representative biomarkers linked to disaster exposure-heart rate variability (HRV) with Interleukin-2 (IL-2, cell-medicated immunity) and Interleukin-6 (IL-6, pro-inflammatory and pro-immunologic), stratified by psychiatric diagnosis.

Design: Participants were assessed for psychiatric diagnosis, IL-2, IL-6, HRV, and HR reactivity to trauma reminders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0306DOI Listing
April 2019
25 Reads

Disaster medicine and response: Optimizing life-saving potential.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Fall;13(4):253-264

Nephrology Section, Department of Internal Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.

Background: Natural and technological mass disasters strike densely populated areas on a regular basis, causing ever growing numbers of deaths and injured, economical losses, social problems, and damage to the environment.

Objective Of The Review: This review aims to provide a comprehensive idea about the spectrum of main problems, essentially presenting a number of basic principles to save as many lives as possible after natural and man-made mega disasters.

Discussion: Medical problems following disasters may be acute, acute-on-chronic, or chronic; they appear from the disaster period up till long thereafter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0305DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Have you "CORED" lately? A comprehensive operating room evacuation drill.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Fall;13(4):239-252

Division of Acute Care Surgery, Trauma, and Surgical Critical Care, Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Introduction: Crises in the operating room (OR) are uncommon events that require an expeditious response from all providers to minimize morbidity and mortality to both patients and staff. Evacuation during a surgical procedure presents a unique challenge. There is a paucity of data on the ideal response, ideal times, and training needs for hospital staff. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0304DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Health protection planning for extreme weather events and natural disasters.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Fall;13(4):227-236

Associate Professor, Department of Public Health, Environments and Society, Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

Objective: There is a need to develop cost-effective methods to support public health policy makers plan ahead and make robust decisions on protective measures to safeguard against severe impacts of extreme weather events and natural disasters in the future, given competing demands on the social and healthcare resources, large uncertainty associated with extreme events and their impacts, and the opportunity costs associated with making ineffective decisions.

Design: The authors combine a physics-based method known as nonextensive statistical mechanics for modeling the probability distribution of systems or processes exhibiting extreme behavior, with a decision-analytical method known as partitioned multiobjective risk method to determine the optimal decision option when planning for potential extreme events.

Results: The method is illustrated using a simple hypothetical example. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0303DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Planning considerations for persons with access and functional needs in a disaster-Part 3: Medical CMIST and recommendations.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Summer;13(3):207-220

Professor of Emergency Medicine, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama.

Although disasters can affect anyone in a given community or region, those with access and functional needs have the highest rates of morbidity and mortality during an emergency or disaster. There are many unique and complex issues that should be considered when dealing with these individuals in a disaster situation. Who are these individuals, what specific issues should be addressed when considering these members of the population, and what recommendations can be made in order to address their unique needs? How can we include them as part of the all-hazard, comprehensive approach to disaster management? The first part of this three-part series identifies who is included in this population and what are the legal considerations that arise in caring for not only this unique group but also all of the members of the community in a disaster. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0301DOI Listing
May 2019
29 Reads

Planning considerations for persons with access and functional needs in a disaster-Part 2: Evacuation and sheltering.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Summer;13(3):195-206

Professor of Emergency Medicine, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama.

Although disasters can affect anyone in a given community or region, those with access and functional needs have the highest rates of morbidity and mortality during an emergency or disaster. There are many unique and complex issues that should be considered when dealing with these individuals in a disaster situation. Who are these individuals, what specific issues should be addressed, and what recommendations can be made in order to address their unique needs? How can we include them as part of the all-hazard, comprehensive approach to disaster management? The first part of this three-part series identifies who is included in this population and what are the legal considerations that arise in caring for not only this unique group but also all of the members of the community in a disaster. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0300DOI Listing
May 2019
20 Reads

The interagency strategic plan for research and development of blood products and related technologies for trauma care and emergency preparedness 2015-2020.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Summer;13(3):181-194

Director, Division of Blood Diseases and Resources, National Institute of Health (NHLBI), Bethesda, Maryland.

Intensive blood use is expected to occur at levels, which will overwhelm blood supplies as they exist with current capabilities and technologies, both in civilian mass casualty events and military battlefield trauma. New technologies are needed for trauma care, and specifically to provide safer, more effective, and more logistically supportable blood products to treat patients with, or at risk of developing, acquired bleeding disorders resulting from trauma, acute radiation exposure, or other causes. Three of the primary agencies with major research and development programs related to blood products, the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), the Department of Defense (DoD), and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute are uniquely positioned to partner in addressing these issues, which have significant implications for each respective agency, as well as for the US population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0299DOI Listing
May 2019
9 Reads

The medical response to burn disasters in Europe: A scoping review.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Summer;13(3):169-179

Leader of Disaster Medicine Research (GIMC), Departamento de Ciências Biomédicas e Medicina (DCBM), Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, Faro, Portugal.

Introduction: A burn disaster is defined by a mass casualty involving a large number of severely burned victims. Several countries have been confronted with these mass casualties and have developed national burn practice guidelines. This study presents a comprehensive review of the literature related to the benefits and conditions required for the introduction of a burn plan and identify successful strategies in Europe to apply in Portugal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0298DOI Listing
May 2019
7 Reads

Push-to-talk apps for disaster communications: Hurricane season brings technology adaptation.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Summer;13(3):161-167

Faculty, Department of Emergency Medicine; Associate Director, Office of Critical Event Preparedness and Response (CEPAR), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

Effective communication during disasters is essential for emergency management, responders, and impacted populations. Recent hurricanes have drawn attention to the potential utility of push-to-talk (PTT) applications with some such as Zello, garnering over 6 million downloads during the week prior to Hurricane Irma. PTT technology integrates a two-way radio system to transmit and receive messages via point-to-point communication lines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0297DOI Listing
May 2019
14 Reads

National survey of institutional pediatric disaster preparedness.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Summer;13(3):153-160

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Emergency Medicine, The University of Chicago, Comer Children's Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

Objective: Describe institutional disaster preparations focusing upon the strategies to address pediatric patients in disaster preparedness.

Design: Descriptive study using survey methodology.

Setting: Hospitals that provide emergency care to pediatric patients throughout the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0296DOI Listing
May 2019
15 Reads

One-month recovery experience of a disaster relief team functioning as an outpatient clinic following Super Typhoon Haiyan: Changes in distribution of trauma patients and required medical components.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Summer;13(3):147-152

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan, Republic of Korea.

As the distribution of trauma and non-trauma patients changes with time following a large-scale disaster, the required medical resources change commensurately. An understanding of these changes is necessary to provide effective medical support. Super Typhoon Yolanda, one of the strongest recorded tropical cyclones, struck the central area of the Republic of the Philippines on November 8, 2013. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0295DOI Listing
May 2019
6 Reads

No one left behind: Postevent experiences of differently abled individuals in Denmark.

Am J Disaster Med Spring 2018;13(2):129-141

Department of Psychology, Danish National Centre for Psychotraumatology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Purpose: This descriptive study explored barriers and difficulties faced by individuals with a physical disability (IPD) in Denmark in situations of disaster and in everyday problems.

Methods: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 12 IPD who had experienced a possible traumatic event. Due to a lack of participants who experienced a traumatic event, the authors expanded their recruitment strategy to include IPD, who had experienced other critical situations (eg, accidents and personal crises). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0293DOI Listing
December 2018
5 Reads

A scoping review of evaluation methods for health emergency preparedness exercises.

Am J Disaster Med Spring 2018;13(2):107-127

Leader, Behavioural Science Team, Emergency Response Department Science & Technology, Public Health England (PHE), Porton Down, UK.

Objective: To review and analyze evaluation methods currently utilized in health emergency preparedness exercises (HEPE).

Design: This study, part of a larger scoping review that systematically collected and reviewed published evidence related to the benefits of HEPE, provides a further analysis of the evaluation methods utilized in such exercises. We separately analyzed discussion-based and operation-based exercises according to their purpose. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0292DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads

Humerus intraosseous administration of epinephrine in normovolemic and hypovolemic porcine model.

Am J Disaster Med Spring 2018;13(2):97-106

US Air Force Reserve Retired; Professor, Northeastern University; Director of Research, United States Army Graduate Program in Anesthesia Nursing, JBSA-Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Geneva Foundation, Tacoma, Washington.

Objective: Compare the maximum concentration (Cmax), time to maximum concentration (Tmax), mean concentration, rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), time to ROSC, and odds of ROSC when epinephrine is administered by humerus intraosseous (HIO) compared to intravenous (IV) routes in both a hypovolemic and normovolemic cardiac arrest model.

Design: Prospective, between subjects, randomized experimental study.

Setting: TriService Facility. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0291DOI Listing
December 2018
15 Reads

Parents' awareness of disaster plans in children's early learning settings.

Am J Disaster Med Spring 2018;13(2):85-95

Division of Academic General Pediatrics and Primary Care, Department of Pediatrics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois; Mary Ann & J. Milburn Smith Child Health Research, Outreach and Advocacy Center, Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois; Department of Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois; Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois; Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

Objective: Children in early learning settings are vulnerable to site-specific emergencies because of physical and developmental limitations. We examined parents' knowledge of disaster plans in their child's early learning settings.

Methods: In May 2015, we conducted a nationally representative online household survey, including parents of children ages 0-5 years in child care settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0290DOI Listing
December 2018
44 Reads

Planning considerations for persons with access and functional needs in a disaster-Part 1: Overview and legal.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 Spring;13(2):69-83

Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama.

Although disasters can affect anyone in a given community or region, those with access and functional needs have the highest rates of morbidity and mortality during an emergency or disaster. There are many unique and complex issues that should be considered when planning and caring for these individuals in a disaster situation. Who are these individuals, what specific issues should be addressed when considering these members of the population, and what recommendations can be made to address their unique needs? How can we include them as part of the all-hazard, comprehensive approach to disaster management? The first part of this three-part series identifies who is included in this population and what are the legal considerations that arise in caring for, not only this unique group but also all the members of the community in a disaster. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0289DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads

The Canadian Paediatric Triage and Acuity Scale algorithm for interfacility transport.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 ;13(1):57-63

Division of Pediatric Intensive Care, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Objective: Determining pediatric severity of illness in referring centers may be useful for establishing appropriate patient disposition and interfacility transport. For this retrospective review, the authors evaluated the Canadian Paediatric Triage and Acuity Scale (PaedCTAS) tool in regards to individual patient disposition and outcomes.

Methods: A disposition score using the PaedCTAS algorithm was retrospectively calculated from referring center data at the time our transport team was consulted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0282DOI Listing
August 2018
9 Reads

Responding to a medical crisis: Lessons from the Halifax disaster 100 years ago.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 ;13(1):45-56

Associate Anesthesiologist-in-Chief, Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Boston Childrenߣs Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Professor of Anaesthesia, Department of Anaesthesia, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

One hundred years ago, a massive explosion occurred in the harbor of Halifax, Nova Scotia, destroying the city and killing more than 2,000 and injuring more than 9,000. It was the worst manmade explosion the world had ever seen, not exceeded until the atomic bomb blast over Hiroshima in 1945. An urgent appeal for assistance came from the survivors, and many volunteers responded. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0287DOI Listing
August 2018
7 Reads

Tourniquet use in the prehospital setting: Are they being used appropriately?

Am J Disaster Med 2018 ;13(1):37-43

Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine, Quinnipiac University, North Haven, Connecticut; MidHudson Regional Hospital, Westchester Medical Center, Poughkeepsie, New York.

Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate tourniquet use in the Hartford prehospital setting during a 34-month period after the Hartford Consensus was published, which encouraged increasing tourniquet use in light of military research.

Design: This was a retrospective review of patients with bleeding from a serious extremity injury to determine appropriateness of tourniquet use or omission.

Setting: Level II trauma center between April 2014 and January 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0286DOI Listing
August 2018
13 Reads

Post-traumatic stress symptoms following sniper attacks: Effects of television viewing and identification with victims.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 ;13(1):29-36

Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland.

Objective: A series of sniper attacks in the Washington, DC, area left 10 people dead and three wounded. The authors examined the relationship of sniper-related television (TV) viewing, identification with victims, and peritraumatic dissociation to post-traumatic stress symptoms.

Methods: Participants were 1,238 DC residents (ages 18-90, M = 41. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0285DOI Listing
August 2018
10 Reads

Validation of a novel irritant gas syndrome triage algorithm.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 ;13(1):13-26

College of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina.

Objective: Our objective was to validate a novel irritant gas syndrome agent (IGSA) triage algorithm for use in an emergency department (ED). We assessed efficiency, accuracy, and precision of our IGSA triage algorithm based on signs/symptoms of actual patients.

Design: After characterizing the signs/symptoms of an actual IGSA exposure event, we developed and validated the IGSA triage algorithm using a simulated computer exercise to compare the IGSA triage algorithm to the preferred hospital triage algorithm, the Emergency Severity Index (ESI). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0284DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6783806PMC
August 2018
43 Reads

Performance of a novel, manually operated intraosseous device in adult human cadavers.

Am J Disaster Med 2018 ;13(1):5-12

School of International Biodesign, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

Aim: Intraosseous (IO) access in adults is preferred using semi-automatic devices as it is difficult to penetrate the thick cortical layer of long bones using manual needles. The authors have developed an IO device which generates both rotational and axial thrust using a manual driver. This drilling mechanism addresses certain pain-points of current IO devices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2018.0283DOI Listing
August 2018
16 Reads

Emergency operations program is an excellent platform to deal with in-hospital operation disaster.

Am J Disaster Med 2017 ;12(4):267-273

Lancaster General Health/Penn Medicine, Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

Described herein is the utilization of the hospital's Emergency Operations Plan and incident command structure to mitigate damage caused by the sudden loss of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system within the entire operating room suite. The ability to ameliorate a devastating situation that occurred during working hours at a busy Level II trauma center can be ascribed to the dedication of the leadership and clinical teams working seamlessly together. Their concerted efforts were augmented by adherence to an established protocol that had been thoroughly substantiated and practiced during numerous training simulations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2017.0280DOI Listing
April 2018
10 Reads

Acceptability and perceived utility of drone technology among emergency medical service responders and incident commanders for mass casualty incident management.

Am J Disaster Med 2017 ;12(4):261-265

Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, North Worcester, Massachusetts.

Objective: This study seeks to understand the acceptability and perceived utility of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology to Mass Casualty Incidents (MCI) scene management.

Design: Qualitative questionnaires regarding the ease of operation, perceived usefulness, and training time to operate UAVs were administered to Emergency Medical Technicians (n = 15).

Setting: A Single Urban New England Academic Tertiary Care Medical Center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2017.0279DOI Listing
April 2018
17 Reads

Terrorism reports: The tip of the iceberg.

Am J Disaster Med 2017 ;12(4):257-260

Chief Medical Officer, Bureau of Medical Affairs, National Insurance Institute of Israel, Jerusalem, Israel.

Importance: Medical impact of terror is a public health issue as the threat is growing all over the world.

Objective: Our objective was to compare the number of injured and incidents in the three different databases and reports [Global Terrorism Database (GTD), Israeli Security Agency (ISA) and National Insurance Institute (NII)] in Israel.

Design: Retrospective study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2017.0278DOI Listing
April 2018
17 Reads

Deployment of field hospitals to disaster regions: Insights from ten medical relief operations spanning three decades.

Am J Disaster Med 2017 ;12(4):243-256

Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps Field Hospital, Trauma unit, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel (affiliated with the Hebrew University).

Objective: The Israeli Defense Force (IDF) Medical Corps developed a model of airborne field hospital. This model was structured to deal with disaster settings, requiring self-sufficiency, innovation and flexible operative mode in the setup of large margins of uncertainty regarding the disaster environment. The current study is aimed to critically analyze the experience, gathered in ten such missions worldwide. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2017.0277DOI Listing
April 2018
10 Reads