4 results match your criteria American Speech[Journal]

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"Everybody sounds the same": Otherwise Overlooked Ideology in Perceptual Dialectolgy.

Authors:
Betsy E Evans

Am Speech 2013;88(1):63-80

University of Washington.

When analyzing dialectology survey data, researchers usually exclude respondents who do not complete the survey as directed. It is argued here that such "unusable" responses can be considered "outlier" data and analyzed rather than be excluded, allowing otherwise overlooked language ideologies to emerge. Responses to a perceptual dialectology map survey in which 31 of the 229 respondents wrote comments on a map of Washington state, without drawing lines around perceived dialect areas as instructed, are described to illustrate this point. Read More

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Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4387571PMC
January 2013
1 Read

Vowel Duration in Three American English Dialects.

Am Speech 2007 ;82(4):367-385

Ohio State University.

The article reports on an acoustic investigation into the duration of five American English vowels, those found in hid, head, had, hayed, and hide. We compare duration across three major dialect areas: the Inland North, Midlands, and South. The results show systematic differences across all vowels studied, with the longest durations in the South and the shortest in the Inland North, with the Midlands in an intermediate but distinct position. Read More

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Source
https://read.dukeupress.edu/american-speech/article/82/4/367
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1215/00031283-2007-024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2829779PMC
January 2007
3 Reads

The language of bodybuilding.

Authors:
T E Murray

Am Speech 1984 ;59(3):195-206

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December 1985

Tripping out from San Francisco.

Authors:
P Tamony

Am Speech 1981 ;56(2):98-103

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January 1985
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