344 results match your criteria American Sociological Review[Journal]


The Dynamics of Intimate Partner Violence and the Risk of Pregnancy during the Transition to Adulthood.

Am Sociol Rev 2018 Oct 7;83(5):1020-1047. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

University of Michigan.

Using a reproductive coercion framework, we investigate the role of intimate partner violence (IPV) in pregnancy during the transition to adulthood. We use two types of data from a population-based sample of 867 young women in a Michigan county: a 60-minute survey interview with 2.5 years of weekly follow-up surveys, and semi-structured interviews with a subsample of 40 pregnant women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122418795856DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6364682PMC
October 2018
1 Read

Cut to the Quick: The Consequences of Youth Violent Victimization for the Timing of Dating Debut and First Union Formation.

Am Sociol Rev 2017 Dec 12;82(6):1241-1271. Epub 2017 Oct 12.

Bowling Green State University.

Concentrated in adolescence, violent victimization is developmentally disruptive. It undermines physical, mental, and socioemotional well-being and compromises youths' transitions into and progression through key life course tasks. Youth violent victimization (YVV) has been linked to precocious exits from adolescence and premature entries into adulthood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122417734353DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6301030PMC
December 2017

Immigrants' Economic Assimilation: Evidence from Longitudinal Earnings Records.

Am Sociol Rev 2018 Aug 15;83(4):686-715. Epub 2018 Jun 15.

Office of Retirement Policy, US Social Security Administration.

We examine immigrants' earnings trajectories, and measure both the extent and speed with which they are able to reduce the earnings gap with natives, using a unique dataset that links respondents of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to their longitudinal earnings obtained from individual tax records. Our analysis addresses key debates regarding ethnoracial and cohort differences in immigrants' earnings trajectories. First, we find a racially-differentiated pattern of earnings assimilation whereby black and Hispanic immigrants are less able to catch up with native whites' earnings compared to white and Asian immigrants, but are able to almost reach earnings parity with natives of their same race and ethnicity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122418780366DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6290669PMC

Relative Education and the Advantage of a College Degree.

Am Sociol Rev 2018 9;83(4):771-801. Epub 2018 Jul 9.

University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

What is the worth of a college degree when higher education expands? The relative education hypothesis posits that when college degrees are rare, individuals with more education have less competition to enter highly-skilled occupations. When college degrees are more common, there may not be enough highly-skilled jobs to go around; some college-educated workers lose out to others and are pushed into less-skilled jobs. Using new measurements of occupation-level verbal, quantitative, and analytic skills, this study tests the changing effect of education on skill utilization across 70 years of birth cohorts from 1971 to 2010, net of all other age, period, and cohort trends. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122418785371DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6059650PMC

Difficult People: Who Is Perceived to Be Demanding in Personal Networks and Why Are They There?

Am Sociol Rev 2018 Feb 31;83(1):111-142. Epub 2017 Oct 31.

University of California, Berkeley.

Why do people maintain ties with individuals whom they find difficult? Standard network theories imply that such alters are avoided or dropped. Drawing on a survey of over 1,100 diverse respondents who described over 12,000 relationships, we examined which among those ties respondents nominated as a person whom they "sometimes find demanding or difficult." Those so listed composed about 15 percent of all alters in the network. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122417737951DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5937537PMC
February 2018
1 Read

Cultural Meanings and the Aggregation of Actions: The Case of Sex and Schooling in Malawi.

Authors:
Margaret Frye

Am Sociol Rev 2017 4;82(5):945-976. Epub 2017 Aug 4.

Assistant Professor of Sociology, Princeton University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122417720466DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5726532PMC

Grand Advantage: Family Wealth and Grandchildren's Educational Achievement in Sweden.

Am Sociol Rev 2017 Apr 7;82(2):328-360. Epub 2017 Mar 7.

Martin Hällsten, Stockholm University, Department of Sociology, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden

We study the role of family wealth for children's educational achievement using novel and unique Swedish register data. In particular, we focus on the relationship between grandparents' wealth and their grandchildren's educational achievement. Doing so allows us to reliably establish the independent role of wealth in contributing to long-term inequalities in opportunity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122417695791DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5703428PMC

Rising Intragenerational Occupational Mobility in the United States, 1969 to 2011.

Am Sociol Rev 2017 Jun 31;82(3):568-599. Epub 2017 May 31.

University of Chicago.

Despite the theoretical importance of intragenerational mobility and its connection to intergenerational mobility, no study since the 1970s has documented trends in intragenerational occupational mobility. The present article fills this intellectual gap by presenting evidence of an increasing trend in intragenerational mobility in the United States from 1969 to 2011. We decompose the trend using a nested occupational classification scheme that distinguishes between disaggregated micro-classes and progressively more aggregated meso-classes, macro-classes, and manual and nonmanual sectors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122417706391DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5621767PMC
June 2017
5 Reads

NEIGHBORHOOD ATTAINMENT OVER THE ADULT LIFE COURSE.

Am Sociol Rev 2016 12 27;81(6):1276-1304. Epub 2016 Oct 27.

Department of Sociology and Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, ,

This study uses data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, in conjunction with neighborhood-level data from the U.S. decennial census and American Community Survey, to examine the trajectory of individuals' neighborhood characteristics from initial household formation into mid-to-late adulthood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122416673029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5605188PMC
December 2016
25 Reads

Where "Old Heads" Prevail: Inmate Hierarchy in a Men's Prison Unit.

Am Sociol Rev 2017 2;82(4):685-718. Epub 2017 Jun 2.

Pennsylvania State University.

Research of inmate social order is a once-vibrant area that receded just as American incarceration rates climbed and the country's carceral contexts dramatically changed. This study reengages inmate society with an abductive mixed methods investigation of informal status within a contemporary men's prison unit. The authors collect narrative and social network data from 133 male inmates housed in a unit of a Pennsylvania medium-security prison. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122417710462DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5846690PMC

Manufacturing Gender Inequality in the New Economy: High School Training for Work in Blue-Collar Communities.

Am Sociol Rev 2016 08 28;81(4):720-748. Epub 2016 Jul 28.

The University of Texas at Austin.

Tensions between the demands of the knowledge-based economy and remaining, blue-collar jobs underlie renewed debates about whether schools should emphasize career and technical training or college-preparatory curricula. We add a gendered lens to this issue, given the male-dominated nature of blue-collar jobs and women's greater returns to college. Using the ELS:2002, this study exploits spatial variation in school curricula and jobs to investigate local dynamics that shape gender stratification. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122416648189DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5089810PMC

From Patrick to John F.: Ethnic Names and Occupational Success in the Last Era of Mass Migration.

Am Sociol Rev 2016 Feb 7;81(1):85-106. Epub 2016 Jan 7.

Hebrew University.

Taking advantage of historical census records that include full first and last names, we apply a new approach to measuring the effect of cultural assimilation on economic success for the children of the last great wave of immigrants to the United States. We created a quantitative index of ethnic distinctiveness of first names and show the consequences of ethnic-sounding names for the occupational achievement of the adult children of European migrants. We find a consistent tendency for the children of Irish, Italian, German, and Polish immigrants with more "American"-sounding names to have higher occupational achievement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122415621910DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5008868PMC
February 2016
1 Read

Nonmarital First Births, Marriage, and Income Inequality.

Am Sociol Rev 2016 08 14;81(4):749-770. Epub 2016 Jul 14.

Johns Hopkins University.

Many aggregate-level studies suggest a relationship between economic inequality and socio-demographic outcomes such as family formation, health, and mortality; but individual-level evidence is lacking. Nor is there satisfactory evidence on the mechanisms by which inequality may have an effect. We study the determinants of transitions to a nonmarital first birth as a single parent or as a cohabiting parent compared to transitions to marriage prior to a first birth among unmarried, childless young adults in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 cohort, from 1997 to 2011. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122416653112DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5699507PMC

Childhood Disadvantage and Health Problems in Middle and Later Life: Early Imprints on Physical Health?

Am Sociol Rev 2016 Feb 18;81(1):107-133. Epub 2015 Dec 18.

Baylor University.

Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, we examine the relationship between childhood disadvantage and health problems in adulthood. Using two waves of data from Midlife Development in the United States, we investigate whether childhood disadvantage is associated with adult disadvantage, including fewer social resources, and the effect of lifelong disadvantage on health problems measured at the baseline survey and a 10-year follow-up. Findings reveal that childhood socioeconomic disadvantage and frequent abuse by parents are generally associated with fewer adult social resources and more lifestyle risks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122415619617DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4950981PMC
February 2016
1 Read

Family Structure Transitions and Child Development: Instability, Selection, and Population Heterogeneity.

Am Sociol Rev 2015 Aug 30;80(4):738-763. Epub 2015 Jun 30.

Princeton University.

A growing literature documents the importance of family instability for child wellbeing. In this article, we use longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to examine the impacts of family instability on children's cognitive and socioemotional development in early and middle childhood. We extend existing research in several ways: (1) by distinguishing between the number and types of family structure changes; (2) by accounting for time-varying as well as time-constant confounding; and (3) by assessing racial/ethnic and gender differences in family instability effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122415592129DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4902167PMC
August 2015
1 Read

Lifetime Socioeconomic Status, Historical Context, and Genetic Inheritance in Shaping Body Mass in Middle and Late Adulthood.

Am Sociol Rev 2015 Aug;80(4):705-737

Department of Sociology, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Carolina Population Center, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

This study demonstrates body mass in middle and late adulthood as a consequence of the complex interplay among individuals' genes, lifetime socioeconomic experiences, and the historical context in which they live. Drawing on approximately 9,000 genetic samples from the Health and Retirement Study, we first investigate how socioeconomic status (SES) over the life course moderates the impact of 32 established obesity-related genetic variants on body mass index (BMI) in middle and late adulthood. Further, we consider differences across birth cohorts in the genetic influence on BMI and cohort variations in the moderating effects of life-course SES on the genetic influence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122415590627DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4878452PMC
August 2015
1 Read

Penalized or Protected? Gender and the Consequences of Nonstandard and Mismatched Employment Histories.

Authors:
David S Pedulla

Am Sociol Rev 2016 Apr 2;81(2):262-289. Epub 2016 Mar 2.

University of Texas at Austin.

Millions of workers are employed in positions that deviate from the full-time, standard employment relationship or work in jobs that are mismatched with their skills, education, or experience. Yet, little is known about how employers evaluate workers who have experienced these employment arrangements, limiting our knowledge about how part-time work, temporary agency employment, and skills underutilization affect workers' labor market opportunities. Drawing on original field and survey experiment data, I examine three questions: (1) What are the consequences of having a nonstandard or mismatched employment history for workers' labor market opportunities? (2) Are the effects of nonstandard or mismatched employment histories different for men and women? and (3) What are the mechanisms linking nonstandard or mismatched employment histories to labor market outcomes? The field experiment shows that skills underutilization is as scarring for workers as a year of unemployment, but that there are limited penalties for workers with histories of temporary agency employment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122416630982DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4864988PMC

Ideals as Anchors for Relationship Experiences.

Am Sociol Rev 2015 Jun 21;80(3):496-525. Epub 2015 Apr 21.

Pennsylvania State University.

Research on young-adult sexuality in sub-Saharan Africa typically conceptualizes sex as an individual-level risk behavior. We introduce a new approach that connects the conditions surrounding the initiation of sex with subsequent relationship well-being, examines relationships as sequences of interdependent events, and indexes relationship experiences to individually held ideals. New card-sort data from southern Malawi capture young women's relationship experiences and their ideals in a sequential framework. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122415581333DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4838189PMC
June 2015
6 Reads

Ancestry Matters: Patrilineage Growth and Extinction.

Am Sociol Rev 2015 Jun 31;80(3):574-602. Epub 2015 May 31.

The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

Patrilineality, the organization of kinship, inheritance, and other key social processes based on patrilineal male descent, has been a salient feature of social organization in China and many other societies for centuries. Because continuity or growth of the patrilineage was the central focus of reproductive strategies in such societies, we introduce the number of patrilineal male descendants generations later as a stratification outcome. By reconstructing and analyzing 20,000 patrilineages in two prospective, multi-generational population databases from 18 and 19 century China, we show that patrilineages founded by high status males had higher growth rates for the next 150 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122415576516DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4813328PMC
June 2015
31 Reads

Racial Inequality Trends and the Intergenerational Persistence of Income and Family Structure.

Authors:
Deirdre Bloome

Am Sociol Rev 2014 Dec;79(6):1196-1225

University of Michigan.

Racial disparity in family incomes remained remarkably stable over the past 40 years in the United States despite major legal and social reforms. Previous scholarship presents two primary explanations for persistent inequality through a period of progressive change. One highlights continuity: because socioeconomic status is transmitted from parents to children, disparities created through histories of discrimination and opportunity denial may dissipate slowly. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122414554947DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4598060PMC
December 2014
2 Reads

Can We Finish the Revolution? Gender, Work-Family Ideals, and Institutional Constraint.

Am Sociol Rev 2015 Feb;80(1):116-139

University of California, Santa Barbara.

Why has progress toward gender equality in the workplace and at home stalled in recent decades? A growing body of scholarship suggests that persistently gendered workplace norms and policies limit men's and women's ability to create gender egalitarian relationships at home. In this article, we build on and extend prior research by examining the extent to which institutional constraints, including workplace policies, affect young, unmarried men's and women's preferences for their future work-family arrangements. We also examine how these effects vary across levels of education. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122414564008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4564125PMC
February 2015

Neighborhood Foreclosures, Racial/Ethnic Transitions, and Residential Segregation.

Am Sociol Rev 2015 Jun;80(3):526-549

Georgia State University.

In this article, we use data on virtually all foreclosure events between 2005 and 2009 to calculate neighborhood foreclosure rates for nearly all block groups in the United States to assess the impact of housing foreclosures on neighborhood racial/ethnic change and on broader patterns of racial residential segregation. We find that the foreclosure crisis was patterned strongly along racial lines: black, Latino, and racially integrated neighborhoods had exceptionally high foreclosure rates. Multilevel models of racial/ethnic change reveal that foreclosure concentrations were linked to declining shares of whites and expanding shares of black and Latino residents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122415581334DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4479290PMC
June 2015
1 Read

Prenatal exposure to violence and birth weight in Mexico: Selectivity, exposure, and behavioral responses.

Am Sociol Rev 2014 Oct;79(5):966-992

Maryland Population Research Center, University of Maryland, College Park.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122414544733DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4437231PMC
October 2014

Ethnic Identification and its Consequences for Measuring Inequality in Mexico.

Am Sociol Rev 2014 Aug;79(4):775-806

University of Maryland, College Park.

This paper examines ethnic boundary crossing and its impact on estimates of ethnic disparities in children's outcomes in the specific context of Mexico, a country with the largest indigenous population in the Western hemisphere. The boundary that separates the indigenous and non-indigenous population is known to be extremely fluid as it is based on characteristics that can easily change within a generation such as language use, cultural practices and a subjective sense of belonging. Using data from the Mexican census I examine the ethnic classification of children of indigenous parents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122414541960DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4437246PMC

Network Ecology and Adolescent Social Structure.

Am Sociol Rev 2014 Dec;79(6):1088-1121

University of New Mexico.

Adolescent societies-whether arising from weak, short-term classroom friendships or from close, long-term friendships-exhibit various levels of network clustering, segregation, and hierarchy. Some are rank-ordered caste systems and others are flat, cliquish worlds. Explaining the source of such structural variation remains a challenge, however, because global network features are generally treated as the agglomeration of micro-level tie-formation mechanisms, namely balance, homophily, and dominance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122414554001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4271807PMC
December 2014
8 Reads

The Reversal of the Gender Gap in Education and Trends in Marital Dissolution.

Am Sociol Rev 2014 Aug;79(4):605-629

Northwestern University.

The reversal of the gender gap in education has potentially far-reaching consequences for marriage markets, family formation, and relationship outcomes. One possible consequence of this is the growing number of marriages in which wives have more education than their husbands. Previous studies have found this type of union to be at higher risk of dissolution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122414539682DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4212646PMC
August 2014
11 Reads

Changing Work and Work-Family Conflict: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network*

Am Sociol Rev 2014 Jun;79(3):485-516

University of Southern California.

Schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life are work resources that may help employees manage the work-family interface. However, existing data and designs have made it difficult to conclusively identify the effects of these work resources. This analysis utilizes a group-randomized trial in which some units in an information technology workplace were randomly assigned to participate in an initiative, called STAR, that targeted work practices, interactions, and expectations by (a) training supervisors on the value of demonstrating support for employees' personal lives and (b) prompting employees to reconsider when and where they work. Read More

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http://asr.sagepub.com/content/79/3/485.full.pdf+html
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http://asr.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/0003122414531435
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122414531435DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4208075PMC
June 2014
8 Reads

Citizenship and Punishment: The Salience of National Membership in U.S. Criminal Courts.

Am Sociol Rev 2014 Oct 30;79(5):825-847. Epub 2014 Sep 30.

The Ohio State University.

When compared to research on the association between immigration and crime, far less attention has been given to the relationship between immigration, citizenship, and criminal punishment. As such, several fundamental questions about how noncitizens are sanctioned and whether citizenship is a marker of stratification in U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122414543659DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6234017PMC
October 2014

The Genomic Revolution and Beliefs about Essential Racial Differences: A Backdoor to Eugenics?

Am Sociol Rev 2013 Apr;78(2):167-191

Columbia University.

Could the explosion of genetic research in recent decades affect our conceptions of race? In Duster argues that reports of specific racial differences in genetic bases of disease, in part because they are presented as objective facts whose social implications are not readily apparent, may heighten public belief in more pervasive racial differences. We tested this hypothesis with a multi-method study. A content analysis showed that news articles discussing racial differences in genetic bases of disease increased significantly between 1985 and 2008 and were significantly less likely than non-health-related articles about race and genetics to discuss social implications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122413476034DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4026366PMC
April 2013
2 Reads

Racial Variation in the Effect of Incarceration on Neighborhood Attainment.

Am Sociol Rev 2013 Feb;78(1)

Pennsylvania State University.

Each year, more than 700,000 convicted offenders are released from prison and reenter neighborhoods across the country. Prior studies have found that minority ex-inmates tend to reside in more disadvantaged neighborhoods than do white ex-inmates. However, because these studies do not control for pre-prison neighborhood conditions, we do not know how much (if any) of this racial variation is due to arrest and incarceration, or if these observed findings simply reflect existing racial residential inequality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122412471669DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3870004PMC
February 2013
1 Read

Racial Discrimination, Ethnic-Racial Socialization, and Crime: A Micro-sociological Model of Risk and Resilience.

Am Sociol Rev 2012 Aug;77(4):648-677

Arizona State University.

Dominant theoretical explanations of racial disparities in criminal offending overlook a key risk factor associated with race: interpersonal racial discrimination. Building on recent studies that analyze race and crime at the micro-level, we specify a social psychological model linking personal experiences with racial discrimination to an increased risk of offending. We add to this model a consideration of an adaptive facet of African American culture: ethnic-racial socialization, and explore whether two forms-cultural socialization and preparation for bias-provide resilience to the criminogenic effects of interpersonal racial discrimination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122412448648DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3777442PMC
August 2012
3 Reads

Does Specialization Explain Marriage Penalties and Premiums?

Am Sociol Rev 2013 Jun;78(3):477-502

Harvard University.

Married men's wage premium is often attributed to within-household specialization: men can devote more effort to wage-earning when their wives assume responsibility for household labor. We provide a comprehensive evaluation of the specialization hypothesis, arguing that, if specialization causes the male marriage premium, married women should experience wage losses. Furthermore, specialization by married parents should augment the motherhood penalty and the fatherhood premium for married as compared to unmarried parents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122413484151DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3769138PMC

The Effect of Parents' Attitudes on Sons' Marriage Timing.

Am Sociol Rev 2012 Dec 22;77(6):923-945. Epub 2012 Oct 22.

University of Michigan.

Theories of family stability and change, demographic processes, and social psychological influences on behavior all posit that parental attitudes and beliefs are a key influence on their children's behavior. Though we have evidence of these effects in Western populations, there is little information regarding this social mechanism in non-Western contexts. Furthermore, comparisons of mothers' and fathers' independent roles in these crucial intergenerational mechanisms are rare. Read More

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http://search.proquest.com/openview/6d67a1d5de2a18e80cf3ebc7
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3590910PMC
December 2012
2 Reads

Egalitarianism, Housework, and Sexual Frequency in Marriage.

Am Sociol Rev 2013 Feb;78(1):26-50

University of Washington.

Changes in the nature of marriage have spurred a debate about the consequences of shifts to more egalitarian relationships, and media interest in the debate has crystallized around claims that men who participate in housework get more sex. However, little systematic or representative research supports the claim that women, in essence, exchange sex for men's participation in housework. Although research and theory support the expectation that egalitarian marriages are higher quality, other studies underscore the ongoing importance of traditional gender behavior and gender display in marriage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122412472340DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4273893PMC
February 2013
1 Read

Gender and Time for Sleep among U.S. Adults.

Am Sociol Rev 2013 Feb;78(1):51-69

University of Southern California.

Do women really sleep more than men? Biomedical and social scientific studies show longer sleep durations for women, a surprising finding given sociological research showing women have more unpaid work and less high-quality leisure time compared to men. We assess explanations for gender differences in time for sleep, including compositional differences in levels of engagement in paid and unpaid labor, gendered responses to work and family responsibilities, and differences in napping, bedtimes, and interrupted sleep for caregiving. We examine the overall gender gap in time for sleep as well as gaps within family life-course stages based on age, partnership, and parenthood statuses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122412472048DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4164903PMC
February 2013
16 Reads

SEXUAL HARASSMENT, WORKPLACE AUTHORITY, AND THE PARADOX OF POWER.

Am Sociol Rev 2012 Aug 2;77(4):625-647. Epub 2012 Jul 2.

University of Minnesota.

Power is at the core of feminist theories of sexual harassment, though it has rarely been measured directly in terms of workplace authority. While popular characterizations portray male supervisors harassing female subordinates, power-threat theories suggest that women in authority may be more frequent targets. This article analyzes longitudinal survey data and qualitative interviews from the Youth Development Study (YDS) to test this idea and to delineate why and how supervisory authority, gender non-conformity, and workplace sex ratios affect harassment. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0003122412451728
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122412451728DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3544188PMC
August 2012
78 Reads

Variance Function Regression in Hierarchical Age-Period-Cohort Models: Applications to the Study of Self-Reported Health.

Am Sociol Rev 2011 Dec;76(6):955-983

The Ohio State University.

Two long-standing research problems of interest to sociologists are sources of variations in social inequalities and differential contributions of the temporal dimensions of age, time period, and cohort to variations in social phenomena. Recently, scholars have introduced a model called Variance Function Regression for the study of the former problem, and a model called Hierarchical Age-Period-Cohort regression has been developed for the study of the latter. This article presents an integration of these two models as a means to study the evolution of social inequalities along distinct temporal dimensions. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0003122411430940
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122411430940DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3419541PMC
December 2011
1 Read

Neighborhood Effects in Temporal Perspective.

Am Sociol Rev 2011 Oct 20;76(5):713-736. Epub 2011 Sep 20.

University of Michigan.

Theory suggests that neighborhood effects depend not only on where individuals live today, but also on where they lived in the past. Previous research, however, usually measured neighborhood context only once and did not account for length of residence, thereby understating the detrimental effects of long-term neighborhood disadvantage. This study investigates the effects of duration of exposure to disadvantaged neighborhoods on high school graduation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122411420816DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3413291PMC
October 2011
7 Reads

Educational Differences in U.S. Adult Mortality: A Cohort Perspective.

Am Sociol Rev 2012 Aug;77(4):548-572

The University of Texas at Austin.

We use hierarchical cross-classified random-effects models to simultaneously measure age, period, and cohort patterns of mortality risk between 1986 and 2006 for non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black men and women with less than a high school education, a high school education, and more than a high school education. We examine all-cause mortality risk and mortality risk from heart disease, lung cancer, and unpreventable cancers. Findings reveal that temporal reductions in black and white men's and women's mortality rates were driven entirely by cohort changes in mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122412451019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4208076PMC
August 2012
1 Read

Neighborhood Diversity, Metropolitan Constraints, and Household Migration.

Am Sociol Rev 2012 Jun;77(3):325-353

University of Washington.

Focusing on micro-level processes of residential segregation, this analysis combines data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics with contextual information from three censuses and several other sources to examine patterns of residential mobility between neighborhoods populated by different combinations of racial and ethnic groups. We find that despite the emergence of multiethnic neighborhoods, stratified mobility dynamics continue to dominate, with relatively few black or white households moving into neighborhoods that could be considered multiethnic. However, we also find that the tendency for white and black households to move between neighborhoods dominated by their own group varies significantly across metropolitan areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122412441791DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384993PMC
June 2012
1 Read

Segregation and Poverty Concentration: The Role of Three Segregations.

Authors:
Lincoln Quillian

Am Sociol Rev 2012 Jun;77(3):354-379

Northwestern University.

A key argument of Massey and Denton's (1993) is that racial residential segregation and non-white group poverty rates combine interactively to produce spatially concentrated poverty. Despite a compelling theoretical rationale, the empirical tests of this proposition have been negative or mixed. This paper develops a formal decomposition model that expands the Massey model of how segregation, group poverty rates, and other spatial conditions combine to form concentrated poverty. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122412447793DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3956000PMC
June 2012
2 Reads

Uncertainty and Fertility in a Generalized AIDS Epidemic.

Am Sociol Rev 2011 Dec;76(6):935-954

The Pennsylvania State University.

Sociologists widely acknowledge that uncertainty matters for decision making, but they rarely measure it directly. In this article, we demonstrate the importance of theorizing about, measuring, and analyzing uncertainty as experienced by individuals. We adapt a novel probabilistic solicitation technique to measure personal uncertainty about HIV status in a high HIV prevalence area of southern Malawi. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122411427672DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3334314PMC
December 2011
1 Read

Social Environmental Variation, Plasticity Genes, and Aggression: Evidence for the Differential Susceptibility Hypothesis.

Am Sociol Rev 2011 Dec;76(6):833-912

University of Georgia.

Although G×E studies are typically based on the assumption that some individuals possess genetic variants that enhance their vulnerability to environmental adversity, the differential susceptibility perspective posits that these individuals are simply more susceptible to environmental influence than others. An important implication of this model is that those persons most vulnerable to adverse social environments are the same ones who reap the most benefit from environmental support. The present study tested several implications of this proposition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122411427580DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3244082PMC
December 2011
5 Reads

Nonmarital Childbearing, Union History, and Women's Health at Midlife.

Am Sociol Rev 2011 Jun;76(3):465-486

The Ohio State University.

Despite high rates of nonmarital childbearing in the U.S., little is known about the health of women who have nonmarital births. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122411409705DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3244024PMC
June 2011
2 Reads

The Enduring Association between Education and Mortality: The Role of Widening and Narrowing Disparities.

Am Sociol Rev 2011 Dec 7;76(6):913-934. Epub 2011 Jul 7.

University of Colorado Boulder.

This paper examines how educational disparities in mortality emerge, grow, decline, and disappear across causes of death in the United States and how these change contribute to the enduring association of education and mortality over time. Focusing on adults age 40-64, we first examine the extent to which disparities in all-cause mortality by education persisted from 1989-2007. We then test the "fundamental cause" prediction that mortality disparities persist, in part, by shifting to new health outcomes over time, most importantly for those causes of death that have increasing mortality rates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122411411276DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4771063PMC
December 2011

DANGEROUS LIAISONS? DATING AND DRINKING DIFFUSION IN ADOLESCENT PEER NETWORKS.

Am Sociol Rev 2011 Oct;76(5):737-763

Ohio State University.

The onset and escalation of alcohol consumption and romantic relationships are hallmarks of adolescence, yet only recently have these domains jointly been the focus of sociological inquiry. We extend this literature by connecting alcohol use, dating and peers to understand the diffusion of drinking behavior in school-based friendship networks. Drawing on Granovetter's classic concept of weak ties, we argue that adolescent romantic partners are likely to be network bridges, or liaisons, connecting daters to new peer contexts which, in turn, promote changes in individual drinking behaviors and allow these behaviors to spread across peer networks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122411416934DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4198171PMC
October 2011
23 Reads

Bringing the Polluters Back In: Environmental Inequality and the Organization of Chemical Production.

Am Sociol Rev 2010 Aug;75(4):479-504

University of Arizona.

Environmental justice scholars have suggested that because chemical plants and other hazardous facilities emit more pollutants where they face the least resistance, disadvantaged communities face a special health risk. In trying to determine whether race or income has the bigger impact on a neighborhood's exposure to pollution, however, scholars tend to overlook the facilities themselves and the effect of their characteristics on emissions. In particular, how do the characteristics of facilities and their surrounding communities jointly shape pollution outcomes? We propose a new line of environmental justice research that focuses on facilities and how their features combine with communities' features to create dangerous emissions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122410374822DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3172053PMC
August 2010
1 Read