4,311 results match your criteria American Psychologist[Journal]


Police lineups of the future?

Am Psychol 2019 Apr 18. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

School of Psychology.

Problems associated with eyewitness identification decisions have long been highlighted by memory researchers (e.g., Loftus, 1979), with overwhelming evidence that witnesses can err, sometimes with disastrous consequences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000465DOI Listing

Racialized violence in the lives of Black people: Illustrations from Haiti (Ayiti) and the United States.

Am Psychol 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Counseling/Counselor Education.

Notwithstanding the cessation of the transatlantic slave trade in the 19th century and the end of "classical" colonization in African and Caribbean nations in the last century, racialized violence persists and continues to adversely impact the lives of African-descended people throughout the world. In this article, racialized violence involving Black people refers to physical acts and structural processes that prove injurious or deadly to Black people Black people. The structural manifestations of racialized violence include unjust laws and normative practices that constrain the fulfillment of Black people's basic needs (like safety) and diminish their pursuit of liberation from persistent oppression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000453DOI Listing

Bridging psychology and engineering to make technology work for people.

Am Psychol 2019 Apr;74(3):394-406

Human Systems Engineering.

Engineering grand challenges and big ideas not only demand innovative engineering solutions, but also typically involve and affect human thought, behavior, and quality of life. To solve these types of complex problems, multidisciplinary teams must bring together experts in engineering and psychological science, yet fusing these distinct areas can be difficult. This article describes how Human Systems Engineering (HSE) researchers have confronted such challenges at the interface of humans and technological systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000444DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

The workplace health group: A case study of 20 years of multidisciplinary research.

Am Psychol 2019 Apr;74(3):380-393

Owens Institute of Behavioral Research.

The Workplace Health Group (WHG) was established in 1998 to conduct research on worker health and safety and organizational effectiveness. This multidisciplinary team includes researchers with backgrounds in psychology, health promotion and behavior, and intervention design, implementation, and evaluation. The article begins with a brief history of the team, its guiding principles, and stages of team formation and development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000445DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450412PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Answering questions about electronic cigarettes using a multidisciplinary model.

Am Psychol 2019 Apr;74(3):368-379

Center for the Study of Tobacco Products.

Electronic cigarettes (ECIGs) are a relatively new class of tobacco products and a subject of much debate for scientists and policymakers worldwide. Objective data that address the ECIG risk-benefit ratio for individual and public health are needed, and addressing this need requires a multidisciplinary approach that spans several areas of psychology as well as chemistry, toxicant inhalation, and physiology. This multidisciplinary approach would benefit from methods that are reliable, valid, and swift. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000426DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450402PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Impacting development in infants with tuberous sclerosis complex: Multidisciplinary research collaboration.

Am Psychol 2019 Apr;74(3):356-367

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

The Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Autism Center of Excellence Network (TACERN) is a 6-site collaborative conducting longitudinal research on infants with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), focused on identifying early biomarkers for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A multidisciplinary research team that includes the specialties of psychology, neurology, pediatrics, medical genetics, and speech-language pathology, its members work together to conduct studies on neurological status, brain structure and function, neurodevelopmental phenotype, and behavioral challenges in this population. This article provides insights into the roles of the multidisciplinary multisite team and lessons learned from the collaboration, in terms of research as well as training of future researchers and clinicians. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000436DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Transforming prenatal care: Multidisciplinary team science improves a broad range of maternal-child outcomes.

Am Psychol 2019 Apr;74(3):343-355

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences.

Every 8 seconds a baby is born in the United States. Maternal and newborn care are the nation's most expensive clinical services, and despite spending more per capita on health services, the United States experiences worse perinatal outcomes than most other developed countries, and even worse than many developing countries when it comes to maternal and infant mortality, preterm birth, and other comorbid conditions. We established a transdisciplinary clinical research team nearly 2 decades ago to improve maternal and child health through an innovative approach to maternal care delivery: group prenatal care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000435DOI Listing

Multidisciplinary partnership: Targeting aggression and mental health problems of adolescents in detention.

Am Psychol 2019 Apr;74(3):329-342

Department of Psychology.

Justice-involved adolescents meet diagnostic criteria for mental health disorders at much higher rates than their counterparts, and this increased risk persists into young adulthood (Abram et al., 2015; Teplin, Abram, McClelland, Dulcan, & Mericle, 2002). Despite growing recognition of this problem, there remains a dearth of adequate therapeutic services in juvenile detention and marked variation in the quality and availability of community-based services (Kretschmar, Butcher, Flannery, & Singer, 2016). Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/amp0000439
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000439DOI Listing
April 2019
7 Reads

The Missouri Prevention Center: A multidisciplinary approach to reducing the societal prevalence and burden of youth mental health problems.

Am Psychol 2019 Apr;74(3):315-328

Department of Psychological Sciences.

The challenges presented by the growing prevalence, burden, and unmet service needs of youth mental health problems are formidable. During the past decade, scholars and other stakeholders of the Missouri Prevention Center (MPC) have been using a prevention and implementation science approach to develop, implement, evaluate, and disseminate recommended practices in promoting youth mental health in real world contexts. The purpose of this article is to describe the multidisciplinary contributions of MPC to improve the social, emotional, and behavioral health of youth, locally and nationally. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000433DOI Listing

A multidisciplinary understanding of polarization.

Am Psychol 2019 Apr;74(3):301-314

Department of Philosophy.

This article aims to describe the last 10 years of the collaborative scientific endeavors on polarization in particular and collective problem-solving in general by our multidisciplinary research team. We describe the team's disciplinary composition-social psychology, political science, social philosophy/epistemology, and complex systems science-highlighting the shared and unique skill sets of our group members and how each discipline contributes to studying polarization and collective problem-solving. With an eye to the literature on team dynamics, we describe team logistics and processes that we believe make our multidisciplinary team persistent and productive. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/amp0000450
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000450DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

From discipline-centered rivalries to solution-centered science: Producing better probability estimates for policy makers.

Am Psychol 2019 Apr;74(3):290-300

Department of Psychology and Department of Management.

From 2011 to 2015, the U.S. intelligence community sponsored a series of forecasting tournaments that challenged university-based researchers to invent measurably better methods of forecasting political events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000429DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Teams of psychologists helping teams: The evolution of the science of team training.

Am Psychol 2019 Apr;74(3):278-289

Department of Psychological Sciences.

Team training contributes to improved performance, reduced errors, and even saving lives-and it exists today because psychologists collaborated across domains to contribute their expertise. Our objective was to highlight the salient role of multidisciplinary collaboration in the success of team training, an area driven by psychologists responding to real-world problems. In this article, we deliver (a) a historical account of team training research, acknowledging critical turning points that shaped the science; (b) a synthesis of major contributions from subdisciplines of psychology; and (c) a collection of lessons learned in the science and practice of team training. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000419DOI Listing

How psychologists help solve real-world problems in multidisciplinary research teams: Introduction to the special issue.

Am Psychol 2019 Apr;74(3):271-277

Department of Psychology.

Real-world problems are not confined to a single discipline. Multidisciplinary team research combines the methods and theories from different disciplines to achieve a common goal. It fosters collaboration among researchers with different expertise, which can lead to novel solutions and new discoveries that could not be achieved otherwise. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000458DOI Listing

Synergistic dependencies in partner and elder abuse.

Am Psychol 2019 Mar 4. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Adelphi University.

Although dependency in its various forms has been widely studied, most investigations examine manifestations of dependency within individuals. Scrutiny of the literature reveals that synergistic dependencies-situations wherein both members of a dyad manifest excessive dependency of one form or another-play a role in some forms of partner and elder abuse. High levels of interpersonal or economic dependency in a woman coupled with high levels of interpersonal dependency in her male partner increase the likelihood of partner abuse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000456DOI Listing

What is it to discipline a child: What should it be? A reanalysis of time-out from the perspective of child mental health, attachment, and trauma.

Am Psychol 2019 Feb 25. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

School of Psychology.

Parental discipline strategies are a necessary and critical aspect of positive child development. Their qualities confer risk versus protection for the development of mental health problems. Time-out from positive reinforcement is now one of the most common and well-researched discipline procedures across the world, with overwhelming evidence to support its efficacy and acceptability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000449DOI Listing
February 2019

Who watches an ISIS beheading-and why.

Am Psychol 2019 Feb 25. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Department of Psychological Science.

In the wake of collective traumas and acts of terrorism, media bring real graphic images and videos to TV, computer, and smartphone screens. Many people consume this coverage, but who they are and why they do so is poorly understood. Using a mixed-methods design, we examined predictors of and motivations for viewing graphic media among individuals who watched a beheading video created by the terrorist group Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000438DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Carole A. Rayburn (1938-2017).

Authors:
Andy J Johnson

Am Psychol 2019 Feb-Mar;74(2):259

Bethel University.

Presents an obituary for Carole A. Rayburn (1938-2017). A feminist, activist, therapist, and researcher, Rayburn authored or coauthored several copyrighted psychological inventories and dozens of book chapters and journal articles and wrote or edited at least nine books. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000381DOI Listing
February 2019

Yvonne M. Agazarian (1929-2017).

Authors:
Susan P Gantt

Am Psychol 2019 Feb-Mar;74(2):259

Emory University School of Medicine.

Presents an obituary for Yvonne M. Agazarian (1929-2017). Agazarian was a brilliant theoretician, clinician, and teacher who devoted her life to the development of a theory of living human systems (TLHS) and its systems-centered therapy and training (SCT). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000332DOI Listing
February 2019

Nancy M. Petry (1968-2018).

Authors:
John Roll

Am Psychol 2019 Feb-Mar;74(2):258

Washington State University.

Presents an obituary for Nancy M. Petry (1968-2018). Until the time of her death, she was the editor of Psychology of Addictive Behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000441DOI Listing
February 2019

Jeremy David Safran (1952-2018).

Am Psychol 2019 Feb-Mar;74(2):257

Adelphi University.

Present an obituary for Jeremy David Safran (1952-2018). In 1993, Safran became full professor and director of clinical training at the New School for Social Research. At the New School, he developed the program with an affiliation to Beth Israel Medical Center, where he was a principal consultant on a psychotherapy research program founded by Arnold Winston and directed by me. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000373DOI Listing
February 2019

Andrea Farkas Patenaude (1946-2018).

Am Psychol 2019 Feb-Mar;74(2):256

Dana Farber Cancer Institute.

Presents an obituary for Andrea Farkas Patenaude (1946-2018). Patenaude was a pioneer in pediatric and adult psycho-oncology. Researcher, clinician, administrator, educator, mentor, and ardent patient advocate, she was a brilliant scientist-practitioner. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000345DOI Listing
February 2019

Sharon Stephens Brehm (1945-2018).

Authors:
Rex A Wright

Am Psychol 2019 Feb-Mar;74(2):254-255

University of North Texas.

Presents an obituary for Sharon Stephens Brehm (1945-2018). Brehm was president of the American Psychological Association in 2007. Her presidential address was titled "Looking Ahead: The Future of Psychology and APA" (see the July-August 2008 issue of , Vol. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000346DOI Listing
February 2019

Why wasn't sport included? Comment on the special issue on the science of teamwork (2018).

Am Psychol 2019 Feb-Mar;74(2):252-253

Department of Psychology, Springfield College.

The special issue of the American Psychologist (May-June 2018) is devoted to the science of teamwork, with 20 articles addressing the history and foundation of teamwork research and highlighting the importance of teamwork in aviation, military, business, space exploration, academic, and health care settings. Articles that address factors influencing team performance and evaluation of interventions with teams are also included. The editors of the special issue direct attention to key areas in teamwork research that would benefit from further inquiry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000409DOI Listing
February 2019

Advocating alternatives to mandatory reporting of college sexual assault: Reply to Newins (2018).

Am Psychol 2019 Feb-Mar;74(2):250-251

Department of Psychology, University of Oregon.

Our recent article "Compelled Disclosure of College Sexual Assault" examines college and university policies requiring most, if not all, employees to report student disclosures of sexual assault to university authorities, with or without student consent. We provided evidence that these mandatory reporting policies have become ubiquitous in American higher education, despite limited evidence of their safety or efficacy. Commenting on our article, Newins offers helpful advice for psychologists navigating the role of "responsible employee," such as seeking out information about their campus policy for reporting sexual assault disclosures and informing students of reporting mandates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000415DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Ethical considerations of compelled disclosure of sexual assault among college students: Comment on Holland, Cortina, and Freyd (2018).

Authors:
Amie R Newins

Am Psychol 2019 Feb-Mar;74(2):248-249

University of Central Florida.

The recent article "Compelled Disclosure of College Sexual Assault" (Holland, Cortina, & Freyd, 2018) documents the variability in how campuses define responsible employees, reviews the assumptions underlying compelled disclosure, and offers alternatives to compelled disclosure. Compelled disclosure conflicts with several of the general principles of the American Psychological Association's (2016) ethics code and, as a result, is likely to conflict with the values of many psychologists. In this response, the ethical conflicts are identified and recommendations to psychologists to address these conflicts are offered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000363DOI Listing
February 2019

But what do participants want? Comment on the "Data Sharing in Psychology" special section (2018).

Am Psychol 2019 Feb-Mar;74(2):245-247

Seattle Children's Hospital.

This commentary addresses a recent special section on data sharing (i.e., open data) in the February-March 2018 . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000408DOI Listing
February 2019

APA Multicultural Guidelines executive summary: Ecological approach to context, identity, and intersectionality.

Am Psychol 2019 Feb-Mar;74(2):232-244

Department of Counseling, Developmental & Educational Psychology, Boston College.

The initial version of the Multicultural Guidelines, titled Guidelines on Multicultural Education, Training, Research, Practice, and Organizational Change for Psychologists, was published in 2002. Since then, there has been significant growth in research and theory regarding multicultural contexts. The revised Multicultural Guidelines are conceptualized to reconsider diversity and multicultural practice within professional psychology at this period in time, with intersectionality as its primary purview. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000382DOI Listing
February 2019

"Forward flow": A new measure to quantify free thought and predict creativity.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Department of Sociology, University of California-San Diego.

When the human mind is free to roam, its subjective experience is characterized by a continuously evolving stream of thought. Although there is a technique that captures people's streams of free thought-free association-its utility for scientific research is undermined by two open questions: (a) How can streams of thought be quantified? (b) Do such streams predict psychological phenomena? We resolve the first issue-quantification-by presenting a new metric, "forward flow," that uses latent semantic analysis to capture the semantic evolution of thoughts over time (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000391DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Transdisciplinary team science for global health: Case study of the JUS Media? Programme.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Caribbean Child Development Centre, University of the West Indies Open Campus.

The world's most pressing health problems, such as the childhood obesity pandemic, demand creative new solutions. In this article it is argued that psychological theories, concepts, and methods are ripe for integration with those of other disciplines to synthesize innovative transdisciplinary global health solutions. As a model, the process of blending developmental and cross-cultural psychology with health and media sciences to develop a transdisciplinary intervention for youth and families in Jamaica-the J(amaican and) U(nited) S(tates) Media? Programme-is described. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/amp0000383
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000383DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

Racial trauma, microaggressions, and becoming racially innocuous: The role of acculturation and White supremacist ideology.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan;74(1):143-155

Department of Psychological and Quantitative Foundations, The University of Iowa.

Acculturation theories often describe how individuals in the United States adopt and incorporate dominant cultural values, beliefs, and behaviors such as individualism and self-reliance. Theorists tend to perceive dominant cultural values as "accessible to everyone," even though some dominant cultural values, such as preserving White racial status, are reserved for White people. In this article, the authors posit that White supremacist ideology is suffused within dominant cultural values, connecting the array of cultural values into a coherent whole and bearing with it an explicit status for White people and people of color. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/amp0000368
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000368DOI Listing
January 2019
26 Reads

Disarming racial microaggressions: Microintervention strategies for targets, White allies, and bystanders.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan;74(1):128-142

Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University.

Given the immense harm inflicted on individuals and groups of color via prejudice and discrimination, it becomes imperative for our nation to begin the process of disrupting, dismantling, and disarming the constant onslaught of micro- and macroaggressions. For too long, acceptance, silence, passivity, and inaction have been the predominant, albeit ineffective, strategies for coping with microaggressions. Inaction does nothing but support and proliferate biased perpetrator behaviors which occur at individual, institutional and societal levels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000296DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Racial discrimination and racial identity: Daily moderation among Black youth.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan;74(1):117-127

T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University.

The present study examined daily ethnic/racial identity as a moderator for racial discrimination. The idiographic approach was used to understand when Black youth are at risk for negative outcomes in the context of racial discrimination. The current study assessed if within-person changes in racial centrality, private regard, and public regard moderated the daily relation between racial discrimination and depressive symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000367DOI Listing
January 2019

Posttraumatic stress disorder in African American and Latinx adults: Clinical course and the role of racial and ethnic discrimination.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan;74(1):101-116

Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

Research has suggested that African American and Latinx adults may develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at higher rates than White adults, and that the clinical course of PTSD in these minority groups is poor. Factors that may contribute to higher prevalence and poorer outcome in these groups are sociocultural factors and racial stressors, such as experiences with discrimination. To date, however, no research has explored the relationship between experiences with discrimination and risk for PTSD, and very little research has examined the course of illness for PTSD in African American and Latinx samples. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/amp0000339
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000339DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6338337PMC
January 2019
26 Reads

Understanding the link between racial trauma and substance use among American Indians.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan;74(1):88-100

Department of Psychology, Washington State University.

Historians and scholars from various disciplines have documented the pervasive influence of racism on American society and culture, including effects on the health and well-being of American Indian (AI) people. Among the many health problems affected by racial discrimination and oppression, both historical and current, are substance use disorders. Epidemiological studies have documented greater drug and alcohol-related morbidity and mortality among AI/AN Alaska Natives compared to other ethnic groups, and culturally appropriate, effective interventions are sorely needed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000331DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6338088PMC
January 2019

A model of cumulative racial-ethnic trauma among Americans of Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) descent.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan;74(1):76-87

Department of Psychology, The American University in Cairo.

Americans of Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) descent in the United States have been historically understudied, in part due to limitations of racial classification systems that typically include MENA under the broad umbrella of White. As a result, enormous gaps in knowledge about health and mental health disparities exist, with broad public health significance. In particular, there is an urgent need to attend more specifically to MENA Americans' experiences of cumulative racial-ethnic trauma, which occurs at every level of their social ecologies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000344DOI Listing
January 2019

RECASTing racial stress and trauma: Theorizing the healing potential of racial socialization in families.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan;74(1):63-75

Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania.

For youth and adults of color, prolonged exposure to racial discrimination may result in debilitating psychological, behavioral, and health outcomes. Research has suggested that race-based traumatic stress can manifest from direct and vicarious discriminatory racial encounters (DREs) that impact individuals during and after an event. To help their children prepare for and prevent the deleterious consequences of DREs, many parents of color utilize racial socialization (RS), or communication about racialized experiences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000392DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

Healing ethno-racial trauma in Latinx immigrant communities: Cultivating hope, resistance, and action.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan;74(1):49-62

Department of Counseling Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Latinx immigrants living in the United States often experience the negative effects of systemic oppression, which may lead to psychological distress, including ethno-racial trauma. We define ethno-racial trauma as the individual and/or collective psychological distress and fear of danger that results from experiencing or witnessing discrimination, threats of harm, violence, and intimidation directed at ethno-racial minority groups. This form of trauma stems from a legacy of oppressive laws, policies, and practices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000289DOI Listing
January 2019

The Japanese American wartime incarceration: Examining the scope of racial trauma.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan;74(1):36-48

Department of Psychology, University of Michigan.

Ten weeks after the 1941 Japanese military attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, the U.S. government authorized the removal of more than 110,000 Japanese American men, women, and children from their homes in Western portions of the country to incarceration camps in desolate areas of the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000303DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354763PMC
January 2019

The impact of historical trauma on health outcomes for indigenous populations in the USA and Canada: A systematic review.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan;74(1):20-35

Department of Psychology, University of Michigan.

Beginning in the mid-1990s, the construct of historical trauma was introduced into the clinical and health science literatures to contextualize, describe, and explain disproportionately high rates of psychological distress and health disparities among Indigenous populations. As a conceptual precursor to racial trauma, Indigenous historical trauma (IHT) is distinguished by its emphasis on ancestral adversity that is intergenerationally transmitted in ways that compromise descendent well-being. In this systematic review of the health impacts of IHT, 32 empirical articles were identified that statistically analyzed the relationship between a measure of IHT and a health outcome for Indigenous samples from the United States and Canada. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000338DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

American Indian historical trauma: Anticolonial prescriptions for healing, resilience, and survivance.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan;74(1):6-19

University of Michigan.

The American Indian historical trauma (HT) concept is an important precursor to racial trauma (RT) theory that reflects the distinct interests of sovereign Indigenous nations but shares much of the same promise and challenge. Here, that promise and challenge is explored by tracing HT's theoretical development in terms of its anticolonial ambitions and organizing ideas. Three predominant modes of engaging HT were distilled form the literature (HT as a clinical condition, life stressor, and critical discourse), each informing a research program pursuing a different anticolonial ambition (healing trauma, promoting resilience, practicing survivance) organized by distinct ideas about colonization, wellness, and Indigeneity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000326DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6338218PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Racial trauma: Theory, research, and healing: Introduction to the special issue.

Am Psychol 2019 Jan;74(1):1-5

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Racial trauma, a form of race-based stress, refers to People of Color and Indigenous individuals' (POCI) reactions to dangerous events and real or perceived experiences of racial discrimination. Such experiences may include threats of harm and injury, humiliating and shaming events, and witnessing racial discrimination toward other POCI. Although similar to posttraumatic stress disorder, racial trauma is unique in that it involves ongoing individual and collective injuries due to exposure and reexposure to race-based stress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000442DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Mapping 24 emotions conveyed by brief human vocalization.

Am Psychol 2018 Dec 20. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Department of Psychology.

Emotional vocalizations are central to human social life. Recent studies have documented that people recognize at least 13 emotions in brief vocalizations. This capacity emerges early in development, is preserved in some form across cultures, and informs how people respond emotionally to music. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/amp0000399
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000399DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

The socioecological psychology of upward social mobility.

Am Psychol 2018 Dec 17. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Department of Psychology, University of Virginia.

Intergenerational upward economic mobility-the opportunity for children from poorer households to pull themselves up the economic ladder in adulthood-is a hallmark of a just society. In the United States, there are large regional differences in upward social mobility. The present research examined why it is easier to get ahead in some cities and harder in others. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000422DOI Listing
December 2018

Relationship between the Implicit Association Test and intergroup behavior: A meta-analysis.

Am Psychol 2018 Dec 13. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Department of Psychology.

Using data from 217 research reports (N = 36,071, compared to 3,471 and 5,433 in previous meta-analyses), this meta-analysis investigated the conceptual and methodological conditions under which Implicit Association Tests (IATs) measuring attitudes, stereotypes, and identity correlate with criterion measures of intergroup behavior. We found significant implicit-criterion correlations (ICCs) and explicit-criterion correlations (ECCs), with unique contributions of implicit (β = .14) and explicit measures (β = . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000364DOI Listing
December 2018

International Humanitarian Award: Guerda Nicolas.

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Am Psychol 2018 Dec;73(9):1283-1284

The International Humanitarian Award recognizes extraordinary humanitarian services and activism by psychologists, including professional and volunteer work conducted primarily in the field with underserved populations. The 2018 award winner is Guerda Nicolas, a pioneer in improving mental health care systems and policy in Haiti and access to care for Haitians in the United States. Her research and international humanitarian work demonstrate her effectiveness in transforming and empowering communities despite traumatic adversities like the devastating 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000416DOI Listing
December 2018

International Humanitarian Award.

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Am Psychol 2018 Dec;73(9):1282

The International Humanitarian Award recognizes extraordinary humanitarian services and activism by psychologists, including professional and volunteer work conducted primarily in the field with underserved populations. Award recipients are psychologists who, by their extraordinary service at a difficult time, improve the lives and contribute to the well-being of people in a large or small geographic area anywhere in the world. The 2018 recipient of the APA International Humanitarian Award was selected by the 2017 Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0101622DOI Listing
December 2018

Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology: Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus.

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Am Psychol 2018 Dec;73(9):1279-1281

The Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology is given to individuals who have made sustained and enduring contributions to international cooperation and the advancement of knowledge in psychology. The 2018 award winner is Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, "for her tremendous global contributions and impressive achievements in the area of prevention science." Her award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000375DOI Listing
December 2018

Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology.

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Am Psychol 2018 Dec;73(9):1278

This award is given to individuals who have made sustained and enduring contributions to international cooperation and the advancement of knowledge in psychology. The 2018 recipient of the APA Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology was selected by the 2017 Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0101621DOI Listing
December 2018

APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology: Victoria M. O'Keefe.

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Am Psychol 2018 Dec;73(9):1272-1274

The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded annually by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. The 2018 award winner is Victoria M. O'Keefe, "for her meaningful contributions as a Graduate Student. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000410DOI Listing
December 2018