4,500 results match your criteria American Psychologist[Journal]


Risk and resilience in family well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Am Psychol 2020 May 21. Epub 2020 May 21.

Centre for Mental Health Research and Treatment.

The COVID-19 pandemic poses an acute threat to the well-being of children and families due to challenges related to social disruption such as financial insecurity, caregiving burden, and confinement-related stress (e.g., crowding, changes to structure, and routine). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000660DOI Listing

Ethical considerations for psychologists in the time of COVID-19.

Am Psychol 2020 May 21. Epub 2020 May 21.

Department of Psychology, University of Maine.

Psychologists are in a position to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic through research, practice, education, and advocacy. However, concerns exist about the ethical implications associated with transitioning from face-to-face to online or virtual formats as necessitated by stay-at-home orders designed to enforce the social distancing required to flatten the curve of new COVID-19 cases. The purpose of this article is to review potential ethical issues and to provide guidance to psychologists for ethical conduct in the midst of the current crisis and its aftermath. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000661DOI Listing

Donald T. Stuss (1941-2019).

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):595

Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest.

Memorializes Donald T. Stuss (1941-2019). Through his early spiritual training in a monastery, Don developed an interest in the highest forms of human consciousness, ethics, and behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000601DOI Listing

Armand W. Loranger (1930-2019).

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):594

State University of New York at Binghamton.

Memorializes Armand W. Loranger (1930-2019). A preeminent authority on personality pathology, Loranger was known internationally as a scholar who transformed the diagnosis of personality disorders through the development of a systematic structured interview approach, moving the field away from decades of less reliable methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000606DOI Listing

Anne Marie Treisman (1937-2018).

Authors:
Barbara Tversky

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):592-593

Columbia Teachers College.

Memorializes Anne Marie Treisman (1937-2018). Her 1962 dissertation at Oxford University included a remarkable 14 experiments and yielded 11 publications. This impressive body of work convinced Donald Broadbent and others to accept Anne's revised theory of attention in which unattended information was attenuated but not blocked. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000605DOI Listing

Wilbert ("Bill") James McKeachie (1921-2019).

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):590-591

University of West Florida.

Memorializes Wilbert ("Bill") James McKeachie (1921-2019). A past American Psychological Association president, Bill's influence was not limited to the psychology community but extended to teachers of all disciplines who cared deeply about how their students could learn most effectively. A noted educational researcher and organizational leader, Bill's research interests were focused in the areas of (a) student motivation (particularly test anxiety); (b) how student motivation, cognition, instructional choices, and classroom characteristics interact; (c) the improvement of instruction; and (d) helping students to become self-regulated learners. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000595DOI Listing

Optimizing aging: A call for a new narrative.

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):577-589

Department of Psychology, College of St. Scholastica.

Decades of research have shown that biological and psychosocial aging are not as predetermined as had been thought for a long time. Yet, despite a large and growing evidence base, most individuals still hold negative views of aging that keep them from optimizing their chances for healthy and productive aging. Given this general background, this article has three major objectives: (a) to show that the 3 big misconceptions at the heart of the public's negative views of aging can be refuted based on scientific evidence; (b) to illustrate that changing individuals' views of aging calls for the development of a new narrative on aging, one that incorporates the increasing diversity of the aging population; and (c) to discuss how psychologists can contribute to creating this new narrative on aging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000598DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7213015PMC

Culture and well-being in late adulthood: Theory and evidence.

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):567-576

Department of Psychology, Michigan State University.

Aging happens to everyone everywhere. At present, however, little is known about whether life-span adult development-and particularly development in late adulthood-is pancultural or culture-bound. Here, we propose that in Western cultural contexts, individuals are encouraged to maintain the active, positive, and independent self. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000614DOI Listing

Rethinking social relationships in old age: Digitalization and the social lives of older adults.

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):554-566

Department of Psychology, University of Zurich.

Interactions with technology have been shaping human society since its beginning. Recently, digitalization has pervaded all aspects of our lives and provided us with new ways to communicate with our social contacts and develop new social ties. We address how these changes shape the social lives of older adults today. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000604DOI Listing

The positive plasticity of adult development: Potential for the 21st century.

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):540-553

Columbia University.

We are living longer than ever before in human history. But longer lives are at the same time a gift and a challenge for individuals and society alike. Longer lives highlight an extraordinary feature of the human species and, that is, the capacity to intentionally or unintentionally positively modify their own development and aging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000612DOI Listing

Adult development and aging in historical context.

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):525-539

Department of Human Development and Family Studies, The Pennsylvania State University.

Human functioning and development are shaped by sociocultural contexts and by the historical changes that occur in these contexts. Over the last century, sociocultural changes such as increases in early life education have profoundly reshaped normative developmental sequences. In this article, we first briefly review how history-graded changes have influenced levels of objective performance and subjective evaluations among older adults and conclude that old age in countries such as the United States and Germany is getting younger, both on behavioral measures and in people's own perception. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000596DOI Listing

Charting adult development through (historically changing) daily stress processes.

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):511-524

Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin.

This article views adult development through the lens of daily life experiences and recent historical changes in these experiences. In particular, it examines whether theories that postulate general linear increases in well-being throughout adulthood still hold during times of less prosperity and more uncertainty. Descriptive analyses of the National Study of Daily Experiences chart show how stress in the daily lives of Americans may have changed from the 1990s (N = 1,499) to the 2010s (N = 782). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000597DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7213066PMC

The bucket list effect: Why leisure goals are often deferred until retirement.

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):499-510

University of Zurich.

The central argument of this article is that historical changes in longevity in Western societies, globalization, and the weakening of social expectations regarding the timing of developmental goals lead to a compression of the time for pursuing highly demanding developmental goals related to work and family in late young and middle adulthood. The expectation of longevity might lead adults to construct a "bucket list," postponing important leisure and social goals to the postretirement phase. Jointly, the weakening of age-related social expectations and the long postretirement phase in Western societies might result in a stronger segregation of the life course: education in "emerging adulthood," work and family in later young and middle adulthood, leisure and social goals in later adulthood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000617DOI Listing

Work in the 21st century: New directions for aging and adult development.

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):486-498

School of Psychology, Georgia Institute of Technology.

The changing nature of work is having a profound impact on the human experience, particularly among older workers. Two integrative theoretical and empirical frameworks of adult development over the past 3 decades provide new insights into aging and work in the 21st century. The first framework focuses on adult intellect and the second on work motivation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000615DOI Listing

Midlife in the 2020s: Opportunities and challenges.

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):470-485

Department of Psychology, Brandeis University.

Development is a cumulative, lifelong process, but strikingly little is known about development in midlife. As a consequence, many misconceptions exist about the nature of midlife and the developmental milestones and challenges faced by middle-aged adults. We first review dominant views and empirical research that has debunked false narratives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000591DOI Listing

Sociohistorical context and adult social development: New directions for 21st century research.

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):457-469

Department of Psychology, University of Basel.

To date, most explanations of adult social development within the field of psychology assume universal age-related processes. The majority of these explanations, however, stem from studies on a limited number of cohorts that were socialized in specific social contexts. As a consequence, the current knowledge on adult social development confounds age-related and contextual influences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000611DOI Listing

Reproductive identity: An emerging concept.

Authors:
Aurélie M Athan

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):445-456

Teachers College, Columbia University.

Deciding whether or not to become a parent is a developmental milestone in the adult life course yet the specific term of reproductive identity is not commonplace. Significant demographic shifts in fertility and the social ideals of self-realization have impacted how reproduction is performed and families are structured, particularly for women and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex and Asexual (LGBTQIA) communities. Like gender and sexuality, reproduction is a healthy aspect of human expression to be openly explored, destigmatized, and self-authored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000623DOI Listing

Established adulthood: A new conception of ages 30 to 45.

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):431-444

Department of Family Life, Brigham Young University.

In developed countries, the years from Age 30 to 45 are, for many, the most intense, demanding, and rewarding years of adult life. During this period of the life span most adults must negotiate the intersecting demands of progressing in a chosen career, maintaining an intimate partnership, and caring for children. Successes or difficulties in meeting these simultaneous demands have the potential to profoundly influence the direction of a person's adult life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000600DOI Listing

Rethinking adult development: Introduction to the special issue.

Am Psychol 2020 May-Jun;75(4):425-430

Department of Psychology, Brandeis University.

This is the introduction for the special issue of American Psychologist titled "Rethinking Adult Development: New Ideas for New Times." It highlights the main themes of the special issue and discusses the implications of current trends for future directions. Entry to adult family and work roles now comes later than ever before. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000633DOI Listing

The neglected 95% revisited: Is American psychology becoming less American?

Am Psychol 2020 Apr 9. Epub 2020 Apr 9.

Department of Psychology, Clark University.

The field of psychology prides itself on being a data-driven science. In 2008, however, Arnett brought to light a major weakness in the evidence on which models, measures, and theories in psychology rest. He demonstrated that the most prominent journals in six subdisciplines of psychology focused almost exclusively (over 70% of samples and authors) on a cultural context, the United States, shared by only 5% of the world's population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000622DOI Listing

Charles S. Carver (1947-2019).

Am Psychol 2020 Apr;75(3):415

Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University.

Presents an obituary for Charles S. Carver (1947-2019). Carver was known for his pioneering theory and research on behavioral self-regulation as reflected in goal-directed action. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000576DOI Listing

Janet Rogers Matthews (1944-2019).

Am Psychol 2020 Apr;75(3):414

University of North Carolina Wilmington.

Presents an obituary for Janet Rogers Matthews (1944-2019). Janet was a tenured psychology faculty at Creighton University before joining the Department of Psychology of Loyola University New Orleans. She remained on their faculty for 30 years, until 2014, when she became professor emerita. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000529DOI Listing

Edward E. Sampson (1934-2019).

Am Psychol 2020 Apr;75(3):413

Pacific School of Religion and the Graduate Theological Union.

Presents an obituary for Edward E. Sampson (1934-2019). Sampson was a brilliant critical psychologist and social commentator. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000602DOI Listing

Susan L. Morrow (1942-2018).

Am Psychol 2020 Apr;75(3):412

University of Maryland.

Presents an obituary for Susan L. Morrow (1942-2018) Morrow was Professor Emerita in Counseling Psychology at the University of Utah, a licensed psychologist, an American Psychological Association (APA) fellow, a feminist and social justice activist, and a mentor, colleague, and friend. Born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on November 18, 1942, she received her Bachelor of Arts in elementary education from Concordia Teachers College before pursuing a master's degree in counseling and a doctoral degree in counseling psychology (1992) at Arizona State University. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000589DOI Listing

Edward Zigler (1930-2019).

Am Psychol 2020 Apr;75(3):410-411

Arizona State University.

Presents an obituary for Edward Zeigler (1930-2019). Yale University's Sterling Professor Emeritus of Psychology Edward Zigler often encouraged his students and junior colleagues with the refrain, "You are doing God's work," but warned them that they would have to be ready to "Lose, lose, lose" in the process. This dual-pronged exhortation reflected Ed's value that no cause is greater than that of improving the lives of children and their families who are vulnerable because of life circumstances. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000506DOI Listing

Olivia Juliette Hooker (1915-2018).

Authors:
Dolores Morris

Am Psychol 2020 Apr;75(3):408-409

Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, New York University.

Presents an obituary for Olivia Juliette Hooker (1915-2018). Olivia's capacity to overcome adversity began at age 6. During the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921, the community that provided her affirmation and stability was destroyed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000535DOI Listing

Debate around leadership in the Stanford Prison Experiment: Reply to Zimbardo and Haney (2020) and Chan et al. (2020).

Am Psychol 2020 04;75(3):406-407

School of Psychology, University of Queensland.

Access to the Stanford University archive has revealed new material that makes it possible to debate the precise nature and causes of events in the Stanford Prison Experiment. What the authors see as important is that these materials show the experimenters engaged in processes of identity leadership, which encouraged guard cruelty by presenting it as necessary for the achievement of noble collective goals. However, the authors encourage students, teachers, and researchers to engage with this new material themselves to explore alternative perspectives on what actually occurred in the study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000627DOI Listing

Identity leadership is manifested via integrative complexity: Comment on Haslam et al. (2019).

Am Psychol 2020 04;75(3):403-405

Department of Psychology, University of Montana.

Haslam, Reicher, and Van Bavel (2019) convincingly argued that experimenters in the Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE) influenced prisoners via identity-based communication. However, Haslam et al. focused on direct mechanisms of identity communication. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000618DOI Listing

Continuing to acknowledge the power of dehumanizing environments: Comment on Haslam et al. (2019) and Le Texier (2019).

Am Psychol 2020 04;75(3):400-402

Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz.

Decades after it was conducted, the Stanford Prison Experiment endures as a classic, dramatic demonstration of the potentially destructive psychological dynamics that can be created when one group of people is given nearly total power over a group of derogated others in a powerful, dehumanizing environment such as prison. The authors of the study value the intellectually engaged alternative perspectives that continue to be used to discuss its unsettling results but reject those that are ad hominem, misleading, inaccurate, and unscientific. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000593DOI Listing

How psychology can help limit climate change.

Am Psychol 2020 Mar 23. Epub 2020 Mar 23.

School of Psychology.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has encouraged psychologists to become part of the integrated scientific effort to support the achievement of climate change targets such as keeping within 1.5°C or 2°C of global warming. To date, the typical psychological approach has been to demonstrate that specific concepts and theories can predict behaviors that contribute to or mitigate climate change. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000624DOI Listing

In defense of the passive voice.

Am Psychol 2020 Mar 19. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Department of Psychology.

Writers of scientific articles are familiar with the advice to avoid using the passive voice. Prescriptivists argue that the passive leads to bloated, indirect, and even evasive writing, and they recommend that the active form be used instead. This article defends the passive voice against these charges and argues that this advice is misguided. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000620DOI Listing

Barriers to access, implementation, and utilization of parenting interventions: Considerations for research and clinical applications.

Am Psychol 2020 Mar 5. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Department of Psychology, Roanoke College.

In February 2019, the American Psychological Association approved a resolution on physical discipline of children by parents that recognized its negative impact on children; called for increased use of more effective, alternate forms of discipline; and highlighted the need for greater access to behavioral parenting intervention for underserved groups. Despite a wealth of empirical evidence supporting these statements and similar resolutions by other influential organizations (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000613DOI Listing

Implicit organizational bias: Mental health treatment culture and norms as barriers to engaging with diversity.

Am Psychol 2020 Mar 5. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Silver School of Social Work, New York University.

There are increased efforts to improve patient-provider relations and engagement within North American mental health systems. However, it is unclear how these innovations impact care for ethnic minorities, a group that continues to face social and health disparities. This study examined one such engagement innovation-person-centered care planning-to gain a better understanding of this overall process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000621DOI Listing

Reducing mental health disparities by increasing the personal relevance of interventions.

Am Psychol 2020 Mar 2. Epub 2020 Mar 2.

Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene.

One of the most persistent health disparities is the underutilization of mental health services by people of color. Neither evidence-based treatments (universal focus) nor culturally adapted treatments (group focus) have reduced these disparities. We propose the personal relevance of psychotherapy (PROP) model, which integrates universal, group, and individual dimensions to determine the personal relevance of interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000616DOI Listing

Weight stigma as a psychosocial contributor to obesity.

Am Psychol 2020 Feb-Mar;75(2):274-289

Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Weight stigma is a key aspect of the lived experience of individuals with obesity, and adversely affects health. This article provides an overview of recent evidence examining links between experiences of weight stigma and weight-related behaviors and health (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000538DOI Listing
February 2020

How psychological insights can inform food policies to address unhealthy eating habits.

Am Psychol 2020 Feb-Mar;75(2):265-273

Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

In this article, insights from psychology and behavioral economics are identified that help explain why it is hard to maintain healthy eating habits in modern food environments. Most eating decisions engage System 1, rather than System 2, processing, making it difficult for people to consistently make healthy choices in food environments that encourage overconsumption of unhealthy foods. The psychological vulnerabilities discussed include emotions and associations mattering more than reason, difficulty processing complex information, present-biased preferences and planning fallacy, status quo bias and defaults, and susceptibility to unhealthy foods that are in sight and, therefore, in mind. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000554DOI Listing
February 2020

A review of the psychosocial aspects of clinically severe obesity and bariatric surgery.

Am Psychol 2020 Feb-Mar;75(2):252-264

Department of Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine.

For the past 2 decades, clinically severe obesity (operationalized as a body mass index ≥40 kg/m2) has increased at a more pronounced rate that less severe obesity. As a result, the surgical treatment of obesity (bariatric surgery) has become a more widely accepted, yet still underutilized, treatment for persons with severe obesity and significant weight-related health problems. Psychologists play a central role on the multidisciplinary team involved in the preoperative assessment and postoperative management of patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000550DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7027921PMC
February 2021

Lifestyle modification approaches for the treatment of obesity in adults.

Am Psychol 2020 Feb-Mar;75(2):235-251

Department of Psychology, Drexel University.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has recommended that primary care clinicians screen all adults for obesity and provide those affected intensive multicomponent behavioral interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000517DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7027681PMC
February 2021

Cognitive dysfunction is a risk factor for overeating and obesity.

Am Psychol 2020 Feb-Mar;75(2):219-234

Department of Psychology, Oklahoma State University.

This article introduces the rapidly growing literature linking cognitive dysfunction to overeating and obesity. Though neural responses to food and food cues can predispose individuals to overeating, these processes are moderated by a series of cognitive factors. Deficits in attentional bias, delay discounting, and episodic memory have clear connections to overeating in both laboratory and real-world settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000585DOI Listing
February 2020

Randomized controlled trial testing the effectiveness of adaptive "SMART" stepped-care treatment for adults with binge-eating disorder comorbid with obesity.

Am Psychol 2020 Feb-Mar;75(2):204-218

Department of Biostatistics, Yale University School of Public Health.

This randomized controlled trial (RCT) tested effectiveness of adaptive SMART stepped-care treatment to "standard" behavioral weight loss (BWL [standard]) for patients with binge-eating disorder (BED) and obesity. One hundred ninety-one patients were randomly assigned to 6 months of BWL (standard; n = 39) or stepped care (n = 152). Within stepped care, patients started with BWL for 1 month; treatment responders continued BWL, whereas nonresponders switched to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and patients receiving stepped care were additionally randomized to weight-loss medication or placebo (double-blind) for the remaining 5 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000534DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7027689PMC
February 2021

A developmental framework of binge-eating disorder based on pediatric loss of control eating.

Am Psychol 2020 Feb-Mar;75(2):189-203

Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine.

Although binge-eating disorder may manifest in childhood, a significantly larger proportion of youth report episodes involving a loss of control while eating, the hallmark feature of binge eating that predicts excess weight gain and obesity. Adults with binge-eating disorder often report that symptoms emerged during childhood or adolescence, suggesting that a developmental perspective of binge eating may be warranted. Thus, loss of control eating may be a marker of prodromal binge-eating disorder among certain susceptible youth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000592DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7027731PMC
February 2021

Summary of the clinical practice guideline for multicomponent behavioral treatment of obesity and overweight in children and adolescents.

Authors:

Am Psychol 2020 Feb-Mar;75(2):178-188

The purpose of this clinical practice guideline developed by the American Psychological Association (APA) is to provide recommendations concerning multicomponent behavioral treatment of obesity and overweight in children and adolescents. Intended users of the guideline include psychologists, other health and mental health professionals, patients, families, and policymakers. The guideline development panel (GDP) used a systematic review conducted by the Kaiser Permanente Research Affiliates Evidence-Based Practice Center as its primary evidence base (O'Connor, Burda, Eder, Walsh, & Evans, 2016). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000530DOI Listing
February 2020

Examining childhood obesity through the lens of developmental psychopathology: Framing the issues to guide best practices in research and intervention.

Am Psychol 2020 Feb-Mar;75(2):163-177

Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan.

Rates of childhood overweight and obesity among youth in the United States remain historically high and can persist into adulthood, resulting in increased health care expenditures, comorbidities, and reduced quality of life. The purpose of this article is to illustrate how principles drawn from developmental psychopathology (DP) can be applied to enhance current conceptualizations of obesity risk during childhood and beyond. DP is a theoretical perspective that has reshaped the landscape of childhood mental health by using principles of developmental science to model complex processes leading to maladaptation or dysfunction with biological, psychological, and contextual roots. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000581DOI Listing
February 2020

Behavioral and social routines and biological rhythms in prevention and treatment of pediatric obesity.

Am Psychol 2020 Feb-Mar;75(2):152-162

Department of Nutrition, College of Education, Health and Human Sciences, University of Tennessee.

A growing body of research supports the potential importance of behavioral and social routines for children's health promotion and obesity risk reduction. Evidence in support of this comes from multiple lines of research, which suggest that specific behavioral routines, namely, eating and sleep routines, may be protective against excessive weight gain and development of pediatric obesity. Emerging work also supports the potential importance of the timing of these behavioral routines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000599DOI Listing
February 2020

Choice is relative: Reinforcing value of food and activity in obesity treatment.

Am Psychol 2020 Feb-Mar;75(2):139-151

Department of Pediatrics, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo.

Persons with obesity find high-energy-dense food and sedentary behaviors highly reinforcing. Diets and exercise programs deprive individuals of many favorite foods and activities, which can counterproductively heighten their value and lead to relapse. Since the value of reinforcers depend on the alternatives available, one approach to reducing food and sedentary activity reinforcement is to build healthy alternative reinforcers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000521DOI Listing
February 2020

Obesity: Psychosocial and behavioral aspects of a modern epidemic: Introduction to the special issue.

Am Psychol 2020 Feb-Mar;75(2):135-138

Department of Psychiatry, Yale University.

Approximately 70% of adults in the United States have obesity or are overweight and at risk of developing obesity over time. Obesity is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality; the economic impact of the health care costs associated with obesity is anticipated to have a profound, detrimental effect on the country's economy within the next several decades. A number of psychologists have dedicated their careers to understanding psychosocial and behavioral factors that contribute to weight gain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000610DOI Listing
February 2020

The right to silence and the permission to talk: Motivational interviewing and high-value detainees.

Am Psychol 2020 Jan 16. Epub 2020 Jan 16.

Centre for Critical and Major Incident Psychology.

Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based intervention that has proved effective across diverse clinical contexts with clients ambivalent about and resistant to behavioral change. This article argues that the principles of MI can be successfully applied to law enforcement (LE) interviews with high-value detainees (HVDs; i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000588DOI Listing
January 2020

Michael J. Kozak (1952-2019).

Authors:
Chris Molnar

Am Psychol 2020 Jan;75(1):123

Mindful Exposure Therapy for Anxiety (META) and Psychological Wellness Center.

Presents an obituary for Michael J. Kozak (1952-2019). He received his bachelor of arts in psychology in 1974 at the University of Pennsylvania. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000518DOI Listing
January 2020

Michael Joseph Chandler (1938-2019).

Am Psychol 2020 Jan;75(1):122

University of Victoria.

Presents an obituary for Michael Joseph Chandler (1938-2019). Michael was trained as a developmental psychologist (though he preferred "genetic epistemologist") at Grinnell College (1960), the University of California, Berkeley (1966), the University of Geneva (1967), and The Menninger Foundation (1967-1968). He was subsequently hired at the University of Rochester (1968-1977) and was eventually appointed Professor, and later Professor Emeritus, at The University of British Columbia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000563DOI Listing
January 2020