2,800 results match your criteria American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education [Journal]


Council of Deans Chair Report, July 2018.

Authors:
Anne Y Lin

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):7568

Immediate Past Chair, Council of Deans, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7568DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448518PMC

Development of Guiding Principles for a New Era in Graduate Education.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):7422

University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, Lexington, Kentucky.

Many external drivers may be influencing a paradigm shift in graduate education. Workforce dynamics are driving a re-examination of what is instructed in graduate programs as well as how curricula are delivered. Most graduate programs have made incremental changes in their philosophical approaches, but new and more dramatic paradigms may be needed to sufficiently address the future needs of employers and students alike. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7422DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448524PMC

Impact, Growth, Capacity-building of Mixed Methods Research in the Health Sciences.

Authors:
Sophia L Johnson

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):7403

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, Maryland.

The use of mixed methods research (MMR) by health scientists has expanded in recent years. The growth of MMR reflects the complexity of health-related research questions including the need to understand stakeholder perspectives. MMR is further incentivized by the release of the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) first version of "Best Practices for Mixed Methods Research in the Health Sciences" in 2011 and their revised version which was released in early 2018, and the increase in federal funding awarded to MMR projects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7403DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448508PMC
March 2019
5 Reads

The Conscience of a Pharmacist.

Authors:
Brian L Erstad

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):7301

University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, Tucson, Arizona.

The purpose of this commentary is to attempt to provide some insight into conscience-clause cases from the perspective of a pharmacist and an academician. Health professionals, including pharmacists, have a social contract with the patients we serve in which the patients give us a level of status not given to non-professionals, and, in return, we agree to put the interests of our patients above our own. Therefore, any discussion of a right-to-refuse service needs to begin with a discussion of the duties and responsibilities of the health professional to the patient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7301DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448519PMC

Developing Critical Thinking Skills in Pharmacy Students.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):7033

College of Pharmacy, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas.

To review the importance of and barriers to critical thinking and provide evidence-based recommendations to encourage development of these skills in pharmacy students. Critical thinking (CT) is one of the most desired skills of a pharmacy graduate but there are many challenges to students thinking critically including their own perceptions, poor metacognitive skills, a fixed mindset, a non-automated skillset, heuristics, biases and the fact that thinking is effortful. Though difficult, developing CT skills is not impossible. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448513PMC
March 2019
1 Read

A Study of the Relationship Between the PCOA and NAPLEX Using a Multi-institutional Sample.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):6867

University of Florida College of Pharmacy, Gainesville, Florida.

To examine the relationship between the Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (PCOA) and the North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination (NAPLEX) using a large, multi-institutional sample of student scores. A matched dataset was obtained from the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) consisting of examination scores for the 1,460 students who completed both the PCOA and the NAPLEX between 2012 and 2015 at six schools/colleges of pharmacy (S/COPs). Bivariate correlations were estimated for total and content area scores on both examinations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6867DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448509PMC
March 2019
1.188 Impact Factor

Employment Trends for Doctor of Pharmacy Graduates of Research-Intensive Institutions, 2013-2017.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):6864

University of Nebraska College of Pharmacy, Omaha, Nebraska.

To determine the current state of employment for doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) graduates based on 5-year trends among graduates of research-intensive institutions and the Pharmacist Demand Index. Data from a cross-sectional survey of PharmD graduates from 10 research-intensive colleges of pharmacy conducted over a 5-year period were used to generate an overview of graduating students' experiences and the outcomes of their job searches. The average response rate of graduates of programs over the 5 years was 75. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6864DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448520PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Pass-Fail Decisions for Borderline Performers After a Summative Objective Structured Clinical Examination.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):6849

College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.

To determine what expert assessors value when making pass-fail decisions regarding pharmacy students based on summative data from objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE), and to determine the reliability of these judgments between multiple assessors. All assessment data from 10 exit-from-degree OSCE stations for seven borderline pharmacy students (determined by standard setting methods) and one control was given to three of eight assessors for review. Assessors determined an overall pass-fail decision based on their perception of graduate competency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6849DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448521PMC

Curricular and Co-curricular Coverage of Leadership Competencies and the Influence of Extracurricular Engagement on Leadership Development.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):6535

Northeastern University School of Pharmacy, Boston, Massachusetts.

To evaluate coverage of leadership-related competencies in a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum and the impact of co-curricular and extracurricular experiences on students' leadership perceptions and self-efficacy. Course syllabi were used to comprehensively map the PharmD curriculum to 11 competencies related to the Leadership CAPE outcome. A survey was developed and administered to all first year through fourth year pharmacy (P1-P4) students to evaluate their leadership experience and engagement, and to assess their attitudes and self-efficacy in 11 leadership competencies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6535DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448516PMC

A Qualitative Approach to Improving Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences in an ACPE International Certified Program.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):6528

College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

To explore the opinions and recommendations of university and health care professional experts regarding the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE) curriculum at the King Saud University College of Pharmacy. Forty-eight health care professionals of different backgrounds participated in a roundtable discussion during a 1-day meeting. The discussion revolved around three predefined themes: the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program learning outcomes, regulations and responsibilities and APPE activities and syllabi, non-clinical rotations, and assessment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6528DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448512PMC

Implementation of a Renal Replacement Therapy Simulation to Strengthen Essential Pharmacist Skills.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):6519

College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida.

To assess third-year pharmacy students' knowledge and application of renal pharmacotherapy using a renal replacement therapy (RRT) simulation. A simulation was developed that involved three stations related to RRT: peritoneal dialysis, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), and hemodialysis. Stations involved demonstration of each modality, literature searches for drug information questions related to renal dosing with written recommendations, and utilization of an electronic medical record (EMR) to develop a verbal Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation (SBAR) for a patient with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6519DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448515PMC

Exploratory Analysis of Entrustable Professional Activities as a Performance Measure During Early Pharmacy Practice Experiences.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):6517

UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

To examine entrustable professional activities (EPAs) as an assessment tool for student pharmacists completing early practice experiences. Students completed a 2-month practice experience upon conclusion of their first year. Student performance on EPAs was assessed by preceptors and students at the midpoint and conclusion of the experience using a scale that ranged from dependent (1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6517DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448523PMC

Examination of Factors Relating to Student Performance on the Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):6516

University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Pharmacy, Memphis, Tennessee.

To examine relationships between students' demographic and academic performance factors and their scores on the Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (PCOA). Students' PCOA scores and demographics (eg, age, race/ethnicity, sex), preadmission data [eg, cumulative and science grade point average (GPA), Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT)], and academic performance variables (eg, pharmacy GPA, academic standing) were analyzed for one class of third-year pharmacy students (N=159). Independent -tests and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used to compare scores by demographic variables. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6516DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448514PMC

Critical Care PGY-2 Graduate Perceptions and Practices Regarding Residency Project Publication.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):6515

Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts.

To characterize the practices and perceptions of recent post-graduate year 2 (PGY2) critical care pharmacy (CCP) residents surrounding the completion and publication of their primary research project. Potential factors and perceptions influencing primary research project publication success were identified and incorporated in a validated electronic survey distributed to 2011 and 2012 PGY2 CCP residency program graduates. Among the 94/124 (76%) respondents, 26% had published their research project (67% were first authors; 50% were successful on first submission), while 36% still planned to pursue publication, and 38% had no plans for their manuscript. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6515DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448510PMC

Publication Records and Bibliometric Indices of Pharmacy School Deans.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):6513

To characterize the publication records and bibliometric indices of current CEO deans at pharmacy schools and colleges in the United States. Using the Web of Science database, the publication records of all CEO pharmacy deans in the US were collected. Bibliometric indices calculated included: lifetime publications, publications/year, h-index, m-quotient, lifetime citations, citations/year, average citations/paper, productivity, and creativity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6513DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448522PMC

Health Informatics Competencies for Pharmacists in Training.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):6512

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Arlington, Virginia.

To gather feedback from focus groups regarding health informatics competencies that should be taught in a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) curricula and to revise the competencies based on this feedback. The pharmacy informatics task force of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) used 11 sources to create a list of pharmacy informatics competencies. Subsequently, faculty feedback about the competency list was obtained via two synchronous online focus groups in August 2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6512DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448511PMC

Using a Novel Student-centered Teaching Method to Improve Pharmacy Student Learning.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Mar;83(2):6505

School of Pharmacy, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, Harbin, China.

To improve students' learning and develop their learning skills in pharmacy education. A novel teaching method composed of Self-study, Test, Question and Discussion (STQD) sessions uses self-, peer-, co-learning, active learning, inductive teaching, and formative assessment to promote student-centered teaching in pharmacy education. STQD has been implemented within courses focusing on instrumental analysis and analytical chemistry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6505DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448517PMC

Curiosity and Knowledge are Vital Components of Curricular Reform.

Authors:
Daniel R Malcom

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):7503

Sullivan University College of Pharmacy, Louisville, Kentucky.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7503DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418844PMC
February 2019

Response: We Need to Be Smarter Than Our Smartphones.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):7477

Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy, Downers Grove, Illinois.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7477DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418839PMC
February 2019

We Need to Be Smarter Than Our Smartphones.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):7350

Director, Faculty Development, UPMC St. Margaret Family Medicine Residency, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7350DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418841PMC
February 2019

Faculty Applicants' Attempt to Inflate CVs Using Predatory Journals.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):7210

Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee.

Recently, scientific publishing has experienced an expansion of journals and publishers whose primary goal is profit and whose peer review process is virtually non-existent. These "predatory" or "opportunistic" journals pose a threat to the credibility and integrity of legitimate scientific literature, and quality science. Unfortunately, many scientists choose to publish in these journals and/or serve on their editorial boards, either due to ease of rapid publication or naivety. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7210DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418842PMC
February 2019

Trends in the Pharmacist Workforce and Pharmacy Education.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):7051

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, Maryland.

This commentary is an observation of longitudinal trends in national data on the pharmacist workforce and pharmacy education. Data indicate seismic shifts in supply and demand, from critical shortage to imminent oversupply. The change in the profession to employing more patient-care focused jobs has been observed as slow and minimal, although academia has focused on the clinical training and rapidly increased enrollments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7051DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418852PMC
February 2019

Identifying Components of Success Within Health Sciences-Focused Mentoring Programs Through a Review of the Literature.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6976

School of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.

To identify programmatic components and structural features associated with success of mentoring programs within the health sciences. Thirty-eight manuscripts representing 34 individual programs were reviewed. Of the institutions represented, 68% were public. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6976DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418850PMC
February 2019

Pharmacy Schools Should Be Involved in Disaster Preparedness Planning at the Local and State Levels.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6968

University of Charleston School of Pharmacy, Charleston, West Virginia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6968DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418855PMC
February 2019

Pre-Class Learning Methods for Flipped Classrooms.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6922

University of Michigan College of Pharmacy, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

To review the types of pre-class learning modalities used in flipped classrooms (FC) and team-based learning (TBL) and determine best practices. Forty-eight articles were included. Reading materials or video lectures were used most often as the primary modality to deliver the pre-class learning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6922DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418854PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Descriptive Analysis of Pharmacy Students' Impressions on Virtual Interactive Case Software.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6821

Department of Pharmacy, University Health Network, and Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

To assess students' impressions on whether Virtual Interactive Cases (VICs) contribute to their learning experience. Ten fourth- year pharmacy students each independently completed the same four VICs followed by a semi-structured interview conducted by VIC project team members. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes using qualitative research methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6821DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418849PMC
February 2019

Spirituality and Religiosity of Pharmacy Students.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6795

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Pharmacy, Little Rock, Arkansas.

To characterize the religiosity and spirituality of final year pharmacy students and examine the impact on performance in pharmacy school and future practice. An electronic survey was sent to 308 students in their final year of pharmacy school at four universities (two private and two public institutions). There were 141 respondents to the survey for a response rate of 46%. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6795DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418838PMC
February 2019

Relationships Between Myers-Briggs Type Indicators and NAPLEX Performances.

Authors:
Kenric B Ware

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6787

South University School of Pharmacy, Columbia, South Carolina.

To examine the relationships between pharmacy students' Myers-Briggs Type Indicators (MBTIs) and their first-attempt NAPLEX scores within an accelerated, dual campus curriculum. Data from the MBTIs and NAPLEX findings were retrieved from a single cohort of the Columbia, SC and Savannah, GA campuses of South University School of Pharmacy. A multiple linear regression technique was performed to assess the degree of variability in first-attempt NAPLEX scores that could be accounted for by MBTIs, campus of enrollment, and gender. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6787DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418840PMC
February 2019

Lessons Learned from Evaluating a Process for Systematic Curriculum Review.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6783

Northeastern University School of Pharmacy, Boston, Massachusetts.

To describe an evaluation of and improvements made to a process of systematic curriculum review. The systematic curriculum review process was developed with the goal of continuous curriculum assessment and improvement. Information on impact and feedback on the processes were collected from curriculum committee experience and an anonymous web-based survey sent to instructors of courses offered by the pharmacy school, and current and past curriculum committee members. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6783DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418851PMC
February 2019

A Longitudinal Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum and Its Impact on the Attitudes and Perceptions of Student Pharmacists.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6510

Western University of Health Sciences College of Pharmacy, Pomona, California.

To describe a longitudinal evidence-based medicine (EBM) curriculum and to evaluate its impact on the attitudes and perceptions of student pharmacists toward EBM. Western University of Health Sciences has had a structured, longitudinal, EBM curriculum for more than 10 years, spanning the first to third years, including the introductory experiential experiences. A survey was administered prior to the main EBM course and at the completion of the course at three time periods to assess student pharmacists' attitudes and perceptions of EBM and interactive pedagogical methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6510DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418856PMC
February 2019
1.188 Impact Factor

An Integrated Dyspepsia Module for First-year Pharmacy Students.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6508

School of Pharmacy, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.

To design an integrated dyspepsia module for first year pharmacy students that combines clinical and professional practice with fundamental sciences in five different science subject areas. The approaches used in designing this module are described with emphasis on strategies adopted to integrate science and practice, and the new ways of working adopted by the design team. Students' views and experiences of the module and its integration were explored using questionnaires. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6508DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418847PMC
February 2019

Teaching History of Pharmacy in U.S. Pharmacy Schools.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6500

Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia.

To determine how the standards for teaching pharmacy history were met by U.S. pharmacy schools, whether schools wanted to expand their commitment to pharmacy history, what pedagogical assistance, if any, was desired, and whether elective courses were offered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6500DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418848PMC
February 2019

Impact of Students' Strengths, Critical Thinking Skills and Disposition on Academic Success in the First Year of a PharmD Program.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6499

North Carolina Association of Pharmacists, Durham, North Carolina.

To determine the critical thinking skills, critical thinking disposition, and personal strengths that contribute to student success and excellence in the first year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Student pharmacists from three cohorts completed the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT) to assess their critical thinking skills, the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) to assess their critical thinking disposition, and the StrengthsFinder 2.0 assessment to determine their top five Signature Themes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6499DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418843PMC
February 2019
13 Reads

Association Between Prerequisites and Academic Success at a Canadian University's Pharmacy Program.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6491

College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.

To identify pharmacy prerequisites associated with academic success in the current Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (BSP) program and anticipated success in the planned Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program at the University of Saskatchewan. Statistical analysis was conducted on retrospective data of the grades of 1,236 pharmacy students admitted from 2002 to 2015. BSP success was calculated using a weighted average of all required courses within the BSP program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6491DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418846PMC
February 2019

A Thematic Analysis of Pharmacy Students' Experiences of the Undergraduate Pharmacy Degree in Ireland and the Role of Mindfulness.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6457

School of Pharmacy, University College, Cork, Ireland.

To determine pharmacy students' experiences of stress as part of the current pharmacy degree, and to explore the potential of incorporating the principles of mindfulness into course work in the undergraduate degree. Undergraduate pharmacy students from the five pharmacy schools in Ireland were invited to participate in focus groups between February and November 2016. Recruitment occurred via emails sent by a school's academic or administrative member. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6457DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418845PMC
February 2019

Impact of Diabetes Simulation on Empathy in Pharmacy Students.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 Feb;83(1):6432

University of Findlay College of Pharmacy, Findlay, Ohio.

To assess the impact of a diabetes simulation activity on empathy in pharmacy students. Students enrolled in an elective diabetes course were required to complete a 3-day diabetes simulation. Pre- and post-activity survey questions were administered to assess the effect of the simulation activity on empathy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6432DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418853PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Share All Your Stories.

Authors:
Gayle A Brazeau

Am J Pharm Educ 2018 Dec;82(10):7434

Marshall University School of Pharmacy, Huntington, West Virginia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7434DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325452PMC
December 2018
10 Reads

Teaching Innovation and Creativity, or Teaching to the Test?

Am J Pharm Educ 2018 Dec;82(10):7423

Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy, Downers Grove, Illinois.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7423DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325465PMC
December 2018
9 Reads

Empathy and the Development of Affective Skills.

Authors:
Anna Ratka

Am J Pharm Educ 2018 Dec;82(10):7192

Wegmans School of Pharmacy, St. John Fisher College, Rochester, New York.

Empathy, the most important human attribute that matters in every aspect of life, is essential in health care. Provision of patient-centered care requires empathic health care practitioners. The correlation between empathy of health care providers and improved patient adherence, satisfaction, and treatment outcomes is well-established. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7192DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325458PMC
December 2018
7 Reads

Building a Theoretically Grounded Curricular Framework for Successful Interprofessional Education.

Am J Pharm Educ 2018 Dec;82(10):7075

University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, Washington.

Experts in the field of interprofessional education (IPE) have called for the use of theory in curriculum design to produce better results with measurable outcomes. While evidence of this practice is growing in the IPE literature, publications about using theoretical approaches to inform curricular design in pharmacy education is nonexistent. This paper describes the process used at the University of Washington for developing a theoretically grounded framework to anchor and guide curriculum design. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7075DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325461PMC
December 2018
7 Reads

Best Practices on Examination Construction, Administration, and Feedback.

Am J Pharm Educ 2018 Dec;82(10):7066

Northeastern University School of Pharmacy, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts.

Examinations are typically used in higher education to objectively assess student learning, and they are also used as a frequent assessment tool in the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum. This paper describes best practices and provides examples for faculty to build reliable and valid examinations, ensure examination security and deter academic misconduct, and enhance student learning and achievement of course objectives. Colleges and schools of pharmacy can incorporate these concepts into comprehensive examination policies and focus faculty development efforts on improving the examination purpose, design, and experience for both faculty and students. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7066DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325455PMC
December 2018
7 Reads
1.188 Impact Factor

Successful Strategies to Spotlight Achievement and Recognize Excellence.

Authors:
Cynthia J Boyle

Am J Pharm Educ 2018 Dec;82(10):7041

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7041DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325459PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Identifying Core Content for Electrocardiogram Instruction in Doctor of Pharmacy Curricula.

Am J Pharm Educ 2018 Dec;82(10):7009

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy, Richmond, Virginia.

Minimum competencies for diagnostic tools, such as the electrocardiogram, are not well-defined in current standards or publications. The electrocardiogram has significant pharmacotherapeutic implications that pharmacists should have an adequate understanding of. This commentary highlights the importance of pharmacists' understanding of key elements of the electrocardiogram and drafts a set of recommended minimum competencies for graduating pharmacy students. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325467PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Comparing Pharmacotherapy Instruction to the 2009 and 2016 ACCP Toolkit Recommendations.

Am J Pharm Educ 2018 Dec;82(10):6771

University at Buffalo, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Buffalo, New York.

To compare pharmacotherapy instruction in Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) programs with the 2009 and 2016 American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) pharmacotherapy toolkits. A survey was sent to representatives at US schools and colleges with PharmD programs. The survey consisted of questions pertaining to pharmacotherapy credit-hours, contact time spent for each therapeutic subject area, and pedagogical methods used. Read More

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http://www.ajpe.org/doi/10.5688/ajpe6771
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6771DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325454PMC
December 2018
15 Reads

Retention of Students' Ability to Incorporate a Computer into Simulated Patient Encounters.

Am J Pharm Educ 2018 Dec;82(10):6748

Concordia University Wisconsin School of Pharmacy, Mequon, Wisconsin.

To assess pharmacy students' ability to incorporate laptop computers into simulated patient encounters (SPEs) in the second professional year (P2) and assess their ability to retain these skills into the next professional year. Students' awareness and confidence in using computers was also assessed. P2 students were surveyed about their awareness of and confidence in incorporating a computer into an SPE. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6748DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325466PMC
December 2018
11 Reads

Stakeholders' Perspectives on Quality Assurance of Pharmacy Education in the Eastern Mediterranean Region.

Am J Pharm Educ 2018 Dec;82(10):6482

The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

To explore pharmacy stakeholders' perspectives in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) on pharmacy education and quality assurance. Thirty-two interviews were conducted with professionals from 15 EMR countries, exploring pharmacy education in the region. Themes were mapped to the five pillars of the International Pharmaceutical Federation's Global Framework on Quality Assurance of Pharmacy Education. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6482DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325457PMC
December 2018
11 Reads

Student Self-Analysis of Their Nonsterile Preparations and its Effect on Compounding Confidence.

Am J Pharm Educ 2018 Dec;82(10):6473

Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

To determine if students who self-analyzed their own nonsterile preparations had increased confidence in their compounding skill. Self-efficacy surveys were given to P1 and P3 students at the beginning and conclusion of a semester in which they completed their regularly scheduled compounding course. The survey assessed their confidence in general compounding skills and their perception if an additional self-analytical component to determine the potency of their nonsterile preparations would improve their confidence level score. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6473DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325456PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Implementation and Assessment of a Novel APPE Intersession Course to Assess Near-Terminal Student Competence.

Am J Pharm Educ 2018 Dec;82(10):6460

University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado.

To provide a novel culminating experience that assesses student competence and achievement of five curricular outcomes during the P4 year. This two-week Intersession course provided faculty assessment of student competence after completing five of seven Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs). Students completed written pre-work assignments generated from real-world experiences from APPEs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6460DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325460PMC
December 2018
8 Reads

Pharmacy Preceptor Judgments of Student Performance and Behavior During Experiential Training.

Am J Pharm Educ 2018 Dec;82(10):6451

College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.

To report the findings of how Canadian preceptors perceive and subsequently evaluate diverse levels of trainees during pharmacy clerkships. Using modified Delphi technique, 17 Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) preceptors from across Canada categorized 16 student narrative descriptions pertaining to their perception of described student performance: exceeds, meets, or falls below their expectations. Twelve (75%) student narratives profiles were categorized unanimously in the final round, six of which were below expectations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6451DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325462PMC
December 2018
1 Read