1,741 results match your criteria American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis[Journal]


A Philosophical Approach to the Rehabilitation of the Patient with Persistent Pain.

Authors:
Philip R Appel

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Apr;62(4):330-343

MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital, Washington DC, USA.

The use of hypnosis to promote hypnoanalgesia has a long history and has been written about anecdotally as well as having been researched in the last several decades. Research has been both clinical in nature and, in the laboratory, trying to understand the brain physiology and processes involved. This article is not about a review of the research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1709152DOI Listing

The Rhythmic Finger Focus Hypnotic Technique: Multilevel Application of Ericksonian Utilization.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Apr;62(4):409-426

Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.

This paper presents a hypnotic technique that starts with a suggested focus on one's fingertips, and movement of the hands in a self-determined rhythm. The technique involves the use of the utilization principle of Milton Erickson in multiple ways. This includes utilizing psychomotor agitation characteristic of psychophysiological arousal, directing it toward movement that generates the sensations upon which to focus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1709150DOI Listing

Hypnotic Ego-strengthening: Where We've Been and the Road Ahead.

Authors:
Shirley McNeal

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Apr;62(4):392-408

Private Practice of Shirley McNeal, San Francisco, CA, USA.

The use of hypnotic ego-strengthening techniques in psychological and medical treatment has been widespread in the fields of psychotherapy, nursing, dentistry, medicine, psychiatry, and related fields. The term "ego-strengthening" became part of the clinical hypnosis literature with the publication of John Hartland's ego-strengthening script in the 1960's. Since then numerous clinicians have utilized and modified Hartland's script, and developed other ego-strengthening scripts as well. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1709151DOI Listing

Review of the International Literature.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Apr;62(4):429-432

Naropa University, Boulder, Colorado.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2020.1713631DOI Listing

Early Hypnotic Intervention After Traumatic Events in Children.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Apr;62(4):380-391

University of Paris 8, St Denis, France.

Post-traumatic stress disorder is a debilitating condition that can develop after exposure to any potentially traumatic event (natural disaster, physical assault, and car accident). This study focused on four pediatric patients presenting with an early stress response after a motor vehicle accident who were offered early therapeutic and a preventive management by hypnotherapy shortly after exposure to the traumatic event. All patients improved after one or several sessions of hypnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1659128DOI Listing

Toward a Relational Theory of Hypnosis.

Authors:
Douglas Flemons

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Apr;62(4):344-363

Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA.

Despite ongoing efforts by clinicians, researchers, and theorists to resolve fundamental disagreements about what hypnosis is and how it works, a diversity of theories and approaches remains. For example, experts still disagree about whether hypnosis constitutes a special or altered state, whether hypnotizability is best conceived of as a stable trait, and whether the clinical application of hypnosis is appropriately conceptualized as . Drawing on the ideas of Gregory Bateson, Daniel Siegel, and others, the author articulates a relational characterization of mind and self as a vantage from which to reexamine common assumptions about hypnosis and to reconsider several questions still animating the field. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1666700DOI Listing

Editorial.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Apr;62(4):327-329

Private Practice, Phoenix, AZ, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2020.1714336DOI Listing

The Effectiveness of Group-based Cognitive Hypnotherapy on the Psychological Well-being of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Apr;62(4):364-379

Islamic Azad University, Yasuj, Iran.

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system mainly affecting young adults. In addition to physical problems, the patients suffer from many psychological problems affecting their psychological well-being. The aim of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of group-based cognitive hypnotherapy on the psychological well-being of patients suffering from multiple sclerosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1709149DOI Listing

Hypnosis in Women with Breast Cancer: Its Effects on Cytokines.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jan;62(3):298-310

Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas, San Nicolas de los Garza, Mêxico.

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of hypnosis on the cytokine levels of women with breast cancer during chemotherapy. Patients with a recent breast cancer diagnosis were assigned to either a control group (n = 20) or to a hypnosis group (n = 20). The control group received standard medical care, while the hypnosis group received 24 sessions of hypnosis over 6 months as an adjuvant therapy to standard medical care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1611536DOI Listing
January 2020

Letter to the editor.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 01;62(3):171

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1677406DOI Listing
January 2020

Relying on Scripts versus not Relying on Scripts.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 01;62(3):172-177

Editor-in-Chief.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1677407DOI Listing
January 2020

Whispering Hypnosis: Phylogenetically Programmed Behavior and a Pluralistic Understanding of Hypnosis.

Authors:
Dan Short

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jan;62(3):178-197

Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine and Health Sciences, Tempe, AZ, USA.

Hypnosis is founded on a legacy of debate and zero-sum thinking as competing schools have argued for the value of one theoretical explanation at the expense of another. More recently, the discussion has turned to pluralistic modeling, with many researchers accepting four central constructs: imagination, suggestion, expectation, and trance experience. The aim of this paper is to introduce a fifth domain, instinct. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1640180DOI Listing
January 2020

Autonomic Cardiac Reactivity to Painful Procedures Under Hypnosis in Pediatric Emergencies: A Feasibility Study.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jan;62(3):267-281

RISSE Laboratory (EA4075), UFR SHE, University of La Réunion, Le Tampon, France.

Pain sensation is characterized by abrupt changes in central nervous system activity producing autonomic reactivity. While clinical hypnosis has demonstrated its benefits for children in pain management, it is not clear whether hypnosis modulated autonomic pain response in children in clinical conditions. Here, we studied autonomic responses under hypnosis to sutures in pediatric emergencies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1564013DOI Listing
January 2020

Attitudes Toward Hypnosis Based on Source of Information and Experience With Hypnosis.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jan;62(3):282-297

University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Attitudes and beliefs toward hypnosis are relevant in promoting hypnotic responses, in predicting the efficacy of interventions that include hypnosis, and in reducing iatrogenic effects in hypnotized individuals. The goal of the present study is to test the impact of previous knowledge about hypnosis and past experiences being hypnotized on attitudes and beliefs about hypnosis. A sample of 1,977 Portuguese students participated in the study; they responded to the Valencia Scale of Attitudes and Beliefs Toward Hypnosis-Client Version (VSABH-C) on two different occasions (test-retest method). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1584741DOI Listing
January 2020

Effects of Prehypnotic Instructions on Hypnotizability and Relationships Between Hypnotizability, Absorption, and Empathy.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jan;62(3):231-266

Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Although hypnotizability exhibits high across-time and across-test consistencies, it is not clear (a) how different preambles to a hypnotic procedure (metasuggestions) influence responsiveness to suggestions and the strength of the association between two hypnotizability scales and (b) how hypnotizability relates to absorption and empathy. In Experiment 1, nonclinical participants ( = 152 women) were administered the Modified Tellegen Absorption Scale (MODTAS), Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI), Hypnotic Induction Profile (HIP), and Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C). In Experiment 2, nonclinical participants ( = 188; 105 women and 83 men) were administered the MODTAS, IRI, and Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1586639DOI Listing
January 2020

Development and Validation of the Thought Impact Scale: A Measure of Subconscious Connectedness.

Authors:
Olafur S Palsson

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jan;62(3):198-230

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

The Thought Impact Scale (TIS) is a new questionnaire designed to measure the theorized psychological characteristic of subconscious connectedness, defined as the degree to which nonconscious mental functions spontaneously interact with, and are accessible to, conscious awareness in everyday life. A principal reason for developing the TIS was the expectation that subconscious connectedness influences hypnosis treatment responses and seeking of hypnosis treatment. Two studies involving 1,216 subjects were carried out to validate the questionnaire. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1561415DOI Listing
January 2020

Letter to the Editor.

Authors:
Bradly Bundrant

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jul - Oct;62(1-2):166-167

a Ballinger Memorial Hospital , Ballinger , Texas , USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1609844DOI Listing
January 2020
12 Reads

Review of the international hypnosis literature.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jul - Oct;62(1-2):159-165

b Naropa University, Boulder, Colorado.

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00029157.2019.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1609843DOI Listing
January 2020
6 Reads

Longing and Fear: The Ambivalence About Having a Relationship in Psychotherapy.

Authors:
Mary J Peebles

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jul - Oct;62(1-2):138-158

a Private Practice , Bethesda , Maryland , USA.

It is unquestioned that reaching the hypnotic state is helped along by relational factors and that, conversely, relational experiences can be deepened through hypnosis. It is also true that deepening the experience of being in a relationship with another person is neither comfortable nor indicated for every patient or therapist. Most humans feel ambivalent about closeness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1604312DOI Listing
January 2020
4 Reads

Relationship Factors in the Theater of the Imagination: Hypnosis With Children and Adolescents.

Authors:
Julie H Linden

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jul - Oct;62(1-2):60-73

a Private Practice, Oquossoc, ME.

This article examines the spatial and social nature of human relationships with children and adolescents in clinical hypnosis. Beginning with the unique way in which the phenomenon of rapport is intrinsic to the therapeutic uses of hypnosis and is distinct among other therapies, the stage is set for the importance of relational hypnosis. Through the use of case vignettes that illustrate developmental imperatives, relationship factors influencing the clinical interaction are demonstrated in practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1568961DOI Listing
January 2020
3 Reads

Letter to the Editor.

Authors:
Michael D Yapko

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jul - Oct;62(1-2):168-170

a Private Practice.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1609845DOI Listing
February 2020
2 Reads

It Takes More Than Two to Tango: Building Secure Attachment Through Hypnotic and Ego-State Relationships.

Authors:
Maggie Phillips

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jul - Oct;62(1-2):95-117

a Private Practice, Oakland , CA , USA.

This article explores how hypnotic strategies can be used within a polyvagal science framework to help create more secure attachment within the therapeutic relationship, as well as within the client in terms of ego-state relationships. Principles of safety and connection are emphasized, along with specific strategies to access the attachment circuits of the ventral vagal system, including the necessity of being present with the client without agenda. Uses of hypnosis related to safety and connection and methods to work with the center core self to facilitate empowerment, self-cohesion, and conflict-free experience are also reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1603099DOI Listing
January 2020
2 Reads

Dancing in the In-Between: Hypnosis, Transitional Space, and Therapeutic Action.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jul - Oct;62(1-2):31-59

b Independent Private Practice, Philadelphia , Pennsylvania , USA.

This article develops the idea that hypnosis is an interactive phenomenon occurring in a relational matrix. A tripartite model for explicating this relational matrix is presented, which includes a discussion of transference, contemporary relationship factors, and the interaction of these to produce a sense of therapeutic alliance. These relationship factors are central to the therapeutic action of hypnosis as a vehicle to potentiate change and growth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1585328DOI Listing
January 2020
2 Reads

Hypnosis and The Therapeutic Relationship: Relational Factors of Hypnosis in Psychotherapy.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jul - Oct;62(1-2):118-137

e Private Practice , Oakland , CA , USA.

Over the years, the field of hypnosis has often given more attention to the state and procedural factors of hypnosis than the relational ones. In an attempt to address this imbalance, the 60th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis (ASCH) had as its theme "Hypnosis and the Treatment Relationship." A centerpiece of this meeting was a collegial discussion among a panel of psychologists with expertise in relational hypnotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1599319DOI Listing
January 2020
2 Reads

In the Intersubjective Space: Hypnosis Through a Neuropsychological Lens.

Authors:
David S Alter

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jul - Oct;62(1-2):74-94

a Partners in Healing of Minneapolis , Minnetonka , Minnesota , USA.

This article explores five interwoven principles about relationship that impact on attentional focus as it relates to the practice of clinical hypnosis. It first reviews how relationship is an irreducible feature of life that greatly predates the arrival of human beings. Second, it describes brain structures that, from an evolutionary perspective, appeared relatively recently, and the neuropsychological abilities those structures confer on human relationships. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1581049DOI Listing
January 2020
3 Reads

The Generative Presence of Relatedness.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jul - Oct;62(1-2):1-11

b Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

In this guest editorial, the authors introduce a special issue of the that focuses on relational factors of hypnosis in psychotherapy. The authors have invited a number of esteemed colleagues to comment on aspects of the therapeutic relationship, and how it informs and influences the processes, techniques, and outcomes of hypnosis and therapy. In addition to summarizing each of these articles, this article analyzes the major relational themes that present across the articles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1609840DOI Listing
January 2020
3 Reads

Gazing Back, Playing Forward: Contemporary Psychoanalytic Musings on the Relational Essence of Hypnotherapeutic Action.

Am J Clin Hypn 2020 Jul - Oct;62(1-2):12-30

a Los Angeles Institute and Society for Psychoanalytic Studies, Los Angeles , California , USA.

To build bridges between hypnosis and contemporary psychoanalysis, this article addresses how hypnosis, when used in psychotherapy, facilitates curative action through its relational essence. The author's extensive experience with hypnosis, psychotherapy, and psychoanalysis orient the narrative toward the unconscious patient-therapist interaction, with particular attention paid to the ethics of the inherent hypnotic seduction. Whether used primarily in relief-oriented ways or geared toward more transformative therapeutic aims, powerful unconscious factors are in play for both patient and therapist and are explicated to illustrate the interactive and frequently unformulated, intersubjective factors that facilitate effective, psychotherapeutic hypnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1580558DOI Listing
January 2020
2 Reads

The Effectiveness of Hypnosis Intervention in Alleviating Postpartum Psychological Symptoms.

Am J Clin Hypn 2019 Apr;61(4):409-425

b University of Malaya , Kuala Lumpur , Malaysia.

Psychological symptoms, particularly postpartum depression, may impair women's well-being after childbirth. Mind-body treatments such as hypnosis are available to help prepare women to maintain or improve their well-being postpartum. The aims of the present study are to determine the effectiveness of a hypnosis intervention in alleviating psychological symptoms (stress, anxiety, and depression) and the symptoms of postpartum depression. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00029157.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1538870DOI Listing
April 2019
9 Reads

Integrating Clinical Hypnosis and Neurofeedback.

Am J Clin Hypn 2019 Apr;61(4):302-321

a University of Utah School of Medicine , Salt Lake City , Utah , USA.

Hypnosis and neurofeedback each provide unique therapeutic strengths and opportunities. This article provides an overview of some of the research on neurofeedback and hypnosis. The author's perspective and recommendations are provided on the relative clinical utility of using either neurofeedback or hypnosis as the initial treatment of choice with various clinical conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1501550DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Combining Hypnosis and Biofeedback in Primary Care Pediatrics.

Authors:
Linda Thomson

Am J Clin Hypn 2019 Apr;61(4):335-344

a Springfield Medical Care Systems , Springfield , Vermont , USA.

The incidence of stress-related, psychophysiological disorders in children is increasing. A goal of both parenting and pediatric health care is to teach children the skills of problem solving, affective and physical regulation, and techniques to better manage stress. In primary care pediatrics, both hypnotherapy and biofeedback can be used to teach psychophysiological self-regulation through relaxation and stress management affecting cognitive change and improving the child's self-image. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00029157.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1511409DOI Listing
April 2019
22 Reads

Review of the International Literature.

Am J Clin Hypn 2019 Apr;61(4):429-433

a Naropa University , Boulder , Colorado.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1583962DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Case Study: Cognitive Restructuring Hypnosis for Chronic Pain in a Quadriplegic Patient.

Am J Clin Hypn 2019 Apr;61(4):394-408

b University of Washington , Seattle , Washington , USA.

This case study reports on a 28-year-old male with spinal cord injury (SCI), quadriplegia, and chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics. The treatment had to be adapted to address the patient's needs, as he was on a respirator and paralyzed from the chin down. The intervention consisted of eight 90-minute sessions. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00029157.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1537973DOI Listing
April 2019
22 Reads

Editorial.

Authors:
Stephen Lankton

Am J Clin Hypn 2019 Apr;61(4):299-301

a Editor in Chief.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2019.1583960DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

The Most Beautiful Man: An Integration of Hypnosis and Biofeedback for Depression and Dissociation.

Authors:
Donald Moss

Am J Clin Hypn 2019 Apr;61(4):322-334

a Saybrook University , Oakland , CA.

Hypnosis and biofeedback techniques are evidence-based psychophysiological therapies that can be applied with a wide variety of medical and mental health disorders. Research shows efficacy for anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTDS), chronic pain, hypertension, fibromyalgia, and a host of other disorders. Hypnosis and biofeedback can also augment the effectiveness of psychotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1517082DOI Listing
April 2019
9 Reads

Strategies and Design of Hypnosis Intervention for Tobacco Cessation.

Authors:
Mary Herring

Am J Clin Hypn 2019 Apr;61(4):345-369

a Healing Interventions, PC.

The purpose of this article is to share approaches and program design to assist healthcare professionals trained in hypnosis help tobacco users become tobacco free. Helping tobacco users overcome their tobacco dependency is generally seen as challenging to healthcare professionals. Efforts to stop a tobacco habit have components which are both physical and emotional in nature and which produce periods of discomfort and high relapse rates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1491386DOI Listing
April 2019
30 Reads

The Evolution of Hypnosis in the Profession of Nursing: We've Come a Long Way, Baby, and Still Have a Long Way to Go.

Authors:
Linda Thomson

Am J Clin Hypn 2019 Apr;61(4):370-393

a Springfield Medical Care Systems , Springfield, Vermont , USA.

Registered nurses (RNs) are the largest, most diverse, and most respected of all healthcare professions in the United States, numbering over 3.5 million (Gallup poll, 2017). Nurses have evolved from being the handmaidens of physicians and bedpan handlers to highly trained and educated clinicians who have assumed an important, integral, and indispensable role in the healthcare system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1500879DOI Listing
April 2019
27 Reads

Clinical Hypnosis and Music In Breast Biopsy:A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Am J Clin Hypn 2019 Jan;61(3):244-257

b Universidad Santo Tomás.

A randomized clinical study was conducted to evaluate the effects on anxiety, depression, stress and optimism levels of an audio-recorded clinical hypnosis intervention and a music session and compare them with a control group in women scheduled for breast biopsy. We analyzed the data of 170 patients with an average age of 47 years, who were randomly assigned to each of the groups. The psychosocial variables were measured in three moments: baseline, which corresponds to the period before the intervention with hypnosis, music or waiting in the room before biopsy; a second measurement after the interventions and a third measurement after the breast biopsy procedure was finished. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00029157.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1489776DOI Listing
January 2019
36 Reads

Active-Alert Hypnosis: History, Research, and Applications.

Authors:
Éva I Bányai

Am J Clin Hypn 2018 Oct;61(2):88-107

a Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University , Budapest , Hungary.

After a brief review of the history of the idea of an activity-increasing hypnotic induction procedure with eyes open and pedaling a bicycle ergometer, the features of active-alert hypnotic induction are summarized. Results of research conducted on healthy volunteers revealed the behavioral, experiential, physiological, and interactional characteristics of the induced altered state of consciousness (ASC), showing both similarities and differences between traditional and active-alert hypnosis. A short description of the application of the method is followed by two brief case studies. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00029157.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1496318DOI Listing
October 2018
11 Reads

Valencia Model of Waking Hypnosis: Background, Research, and Clinical Applications.

Am J Clin Hypn 2018 Oct;61(2):108-124

b University of Valencia , Valencia , Spain.

The goal of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the historical background, methods, and clinical applications of the Valencia Model of Waking Hypnosis (VMWH). The active-alert-waking methods have been developed and used since the 19th century as an alternative when the suggestions for relaxation and drowsiness were not helpful for specific cases, or when the person needed to use hypnotic suggestions in situations that required them to be alert and with their eyes open (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1489773DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Alert Hypnosis With Tai Chi Movement for Trauma Resolution.

Am J Clin Hypn 2018 Oct;61(2):173-184

b University of Minnesota , Minneapolis , Minnesota, USA.

Alert hypnosis has a growing body of evidence to support its use in resolving trauma symptoms. There is also research to support the use of tai chi in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Integrating alert hypnosis with tai chi movements offers the potential to further the benefits of both approaches. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1489775DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Alert, Eyes-Open Sport Hypnosis.

Am J Clin Hypn 2018 Oct;61(2):159-172

a Örebro University , Sweden.

Sport hypnosis (SH) is a form of alert hypnosis defined by mental training procedures based on three techniques in combination: eyes-open hypnosis, traditional eyes-closed hypnosis, and self-hypnosis. The self-hypnotic state is operationally defined as the imagined "inner mental room" (IMR). The main purpose of SH is to produce the sport hypnotic state (SHS), or the flow state, a form of alert hypnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1491387DOI Listing
October 2018
11 Reads

Utilizing the Hypnotic Concomitants of Education: Suggestions to Enhance Teaching and Learning.

Authors:
John C Mohl

Am J Clin Hypn 2018 Oct;61(2):185-197

a Bucks County Community College , Newtown , Pennsylvania , USA.

Clinical hypnosis for improving learning has been advocated by scholars dating back to the late 19 century. Empirical research seeking to validate its use has been supported particularly for real life applications, though less so in laboratory memory experiments. Suggestions for the use of waking/alert hypnosis suggestion for both highly suggestible students who experience more advanced and compelling phenomena associated with hypnosis, and students in general are offered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1489774DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Looking at Alert, Conversational Hypnosis.

Am J Clin Hypn 2018 10;61(2):85-87

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1506636DOI Listing
October 2018
5 Reads

Conversational Hypnosis: Conceptual and Technical Differences Relative to Traditional Hypnosis.

Authors:
Dan Short

Am J Clin Hypn 2018 Oct;61(2):125-139

a Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine and Health Sciences , Tempe , Arizona , USA.

This article provides an overview of conversational hypnosis (CH) as distinct from traditional forms. The article includes a history of Ericksonian hypnosis followed by a conceptual model and operational definitions for CH. The analysis is built on three levels of comparison and contrast. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1441802DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Learning Clinical Hypnosis Wide Awake: Can We Teach Hypnosis Hypnotically?

Am J Clin Hypn 2018 Oct;61(2):140-158

d Augusta Psychological Associates , Fishersville , Virginia , USA.

Conversational hypnosis has been promoted as both more congruent with mechanisms of psychobiological change and more feasibly integrated into clinical care than the more dominant, ritualistic, hierarchical, induction-based Standards of Training in Clinical Hypnosis. Further, it has been argued that, in teaching the legacy standard, clinical hypnosis training lacks pedagogical integrity. This article builds on these premises by piloting a mixed-methods approach to studying the pedagogy and participant evaluations of two professional education events that focused on conversational hypnosis. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00029157.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1437710DOI Listing
October 2018
14 Reads

Hey Wait! I Just Thought of Something Else! Advaita and Clinical Hypnosis.

Am J Clin Hypn 2018 Jul;61(1):18-33

b University of Alberta, Edmonton , Alberta , Canada.

While much has been made of the value of Buddhist mindfulness in clinical treatment, little attention has been given over to its parallels, if not antecedents in Hindu philosophy. Buddhist traditions in the vipassana, ch'an and zen tradition, and the practices associated, find their roots in Advaita philosophy and practice. This article looks at the useful/effective nature of Advaita and its specific application in clinical hypnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1428894DOI Listing
July 2018
6 Reads

Mindful Self-Hypnosis for Self-Care: An Integrative Model and Illustrative Case Example.

Am J Clin Hypn 2018 Jul;61(1):45-56

a Baylor University , Waco , Texas, USA.

The combination of mindfulness and self-hypnosis could provide a tool that is easily implemented by individuals who want to care for their well-being in times of high stress. Each discipline has been shown to be effective in relieving stress, and integration could further facilitate change while creating a tool that is highly accessible. There are many similarities between the two practices, such as focusing of attention and the emphasis on mind-body connection. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00029157.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1456896DOI Listing
July 2018
11 Reads

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Mindfulness, and Hypnosis as Treatment Methods for Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

Authors:
Carolyn Daitch

Am J Clin Hypn 2018 Jul;61(1):57-69

a Center for the Treatment of Anxiety Disorders, Farmington Hills, Michigan, USA.

Individuals suffering from generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) experience a broad range of physical, emotional, and cognitive distress. A hallmark of GAD is anxiety around making decisions. Many clinicians notice improvements in patients through specific modalities, such as mindfulness, hypnosis, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT); however, these individual methods sometimes fall short. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00029157.2018.1458594DOI Listing
July 2018
7 Reads