2,702 results match your criteria American Journal Of Psychology[Journal]


Obituary: BRUCE BRIDGEMAN (1944-2016).

Am J Psychol 2017 Spring;130(1):121-123

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March 2018
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History of Psychology Publish and Perish: Psychology's Most Prolific Authors Are Not Always the Ones We Remember.

Am J Psychol 2017 Spring;130(1):105-119

What is the relationship between being highly prolific in the realm of publication and being remembered as a great psychologist of the past? In this study, the PsycINFO database was used to identify the historical figures who wrote the most journal articles during the half-century from 1890 to 1939. Although a number of the 10 most prolific authors are widely remembered for their influence on the discipline today-E. L. Read More

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March 2018
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The Effect of Sleep Loss on Dual Time-Based Prospective Memory Tasks.

Am J Psychol 2017 Spring;130(1):93-103

The aim of the present study was to deepen knowledge about the effect of a lowered vigilance state on time-based prospective memory (TBPM) performance. For this purpose 2 TBPM tasks (primary and interpolated), which shared a portion of the retention interval, and 3 reasoning tasks, as ongoing activities, were administered after total sleep deprivation and in a regular sleep condition. The results showed a detrimental effect of sleep deprivation on prospective memory performance and a partial dissociation between clock-checking behavior and time estimation for prospective compliance. Read More

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March 2018
3 Reads

Alexithymia and Mood: Recognition of Emotion in Self and Others.

Am J Psychol 2017 Spring;130(1):83-92

The present study explored relationships between alexithymia-a trait characterized by difficulties identifying and describing feelings and an external thinking style-and negative moods, negative mood regulation expectancies, facial recognition of emotions, emotional empathy, and alcohol consumption. The sample consisted of 102 university (primarily psychology) students (13 men, 89 women) aged 18 to 50 years (M = 22.18 years). Read More

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March 2018
3 Reads

Visual Search Load Effects on Age-Related Cognitive Decline: Evidence From the Yakumo Longitudinal Study.

Am J Psychol 2017 Spring;130(1):73-82

The validity of Bucur and Madden's (2010) proposal that an age-related decline is particularly pronounced in executive function measures rather than in elementary perceptual speed measures was examined via the Yakumo Study longitudinal database. Their proposal suggests that cognitive load differentially affects cognitive abilities in older adults. To address their proposal, linear regression coefficients of 104 participants were calculated individually for the digit cancellation task 1 (D-CAT1), where participants search for a given single digit, and the D-CAT3, where they search for 3 digits simultaneously. Read More

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March 2018
3 Reads

Reading Aloud to Children: Benefits and Implications for Acquiring Literacy Before Schooling Begins.

Am J Psychol 2017 Spring;130(1):63-72

Extensive experience in written language might provide children the opportunity to learn to read in the same manner they learn spoken language. One potential type of written language immersion is reading aloud to children, which is additionally valuable because the vocabulary in picture books is richer and more extensive than that found in child-directed speech. This study continues a comparison between these 2 communication media by evaluating their relative linguistic and cognitive complexity. Read More

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Realistic Stimuli Reveal Selective Effects of Motor Expertise During a Mental Body Rotation Task.

Am J Psychol 2017 Spring;130(1):47-62

To investigate the effects of stimulus features on the implementation of motor expertise in body rotations during a mental body rotation task, 2 experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, we investigated the mental rotation abilities in 27 male participants: 14 experts in real body rotations (national level gymnasts) and 13 nonexperts (national handball players). The mental rotation task used left-right judgments and involved 3 types of stimuli: images of a stick figure person, images of line drawings of the human body, and photographs of real male persons. Read More

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March 2018
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Feature-to-Feature Inference Under Conditions of Cue Restriction and Dimensional Correlation.

Am J Psychol 2017 Spring;130(1):35-45

The present study explored feature-to-feature and label-to-feature inference in a category task for different category structures. In the correlated condition, each of the 4 dimensions comprising the category was positively correlated to each other and to the category label. In the uncorrelated condition, no correlation existed between the 4 dimensions comprising the category, although the dimension to category label correlation matched that of the correlated condition. Read More

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Perception of Scenes in Different Sensory Modalities: A Result of Modal Completion.

Am J Psychol 2017 Spring;130(1):23-34

Dynamic perception includes amodal and modal completion, along with apparent movement. It fills temporal gaps for single objects. In 2 experiments, using 6 stimulus presentation conditions involving 3 sensory modalities, participants experienced 8-10 sequential stimuli (200 ms each) with interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 0. Read More

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March 2018
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The Method of Negative Instruction: Herbert S. Langfeld's and Ludwig R. Geissler's 1910-1913 Insightful Studies.

Am J Psychol 2017 Spring;130(1):11-21

Herbert S. Langfeld and Ludwig R. Geissler published insightful articles during the period of 1910-1913 using what they called the Method of Negative Instruction, which anticipated much current research on action control and the role of instructions. Read More

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The Synthetic Experiment: E. B. Titchener's Cornell Psychological Laboratory and the Test of Introspective Analysis.

Authors:
Rand B Evans

Am J Psychol 2017 Spring;130(1):3-10

Beginning in 1 9a0, a major thread of research was added to E. B. Titchener's Cornell laboratory: the synthetic experiment. Read More

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March 2018
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Parallel Interactive Processing as a Way to Understand Complex Information Processing: The Conjunction Fallacy and Other Examples.

Authors:
Irwin D Nahinsky

Am J Psychol 2017 Summer;130(2):201-222

Parallel interactive processing (PIP) represents an approach in which specific context generates interactive relationships between general attributes. This article summarizes previous research that demonstrates how such relationships influence inference making in categorization. This is followed by evidence that the approach can be extended to other areas of cognition, including probability judgments. Read More

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Modern Speed-Reading Apps Do Not Foster Reading Comprehension.

Am J Psychol 2017 Summer;130(2):183-199

New computer apps are gaining popularity by suggesting that reading speeds can be drastically increased when eye movements that normally occur during reading are eliminated. This is done using rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), where words are presented 1 at a time, thus preventing natural eye movements such as saccades, fixations, and regressions from occurring. Al- though the companies producing these apps suggest that RSVP reading does not yield comprehension deficits, research investigating the role of eye movements in reading documents shows the necessity of natural eye movements for accurate comprehension. Read More

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March 2018
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Failures Due to Interruptions or Distractions: A Review and a New Framework.

Am J Psychol 2017 Summer;130(2):163-181

Interruptions of ongoing activities have spread since the development of and global increase in technology use and the general speeding in pace we all experience every day. Their negative effects are well known: decline in performance and emotional distress. However, the literature still needs to shed light on the exact cognitive mechanisms involved in the way users decide to reply to an interruption, on the effects of interruptions of different durations, and on factors influencing reactivation of task schemata and goals at resumption. Read More

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March 2018
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Edwin G. Boring: The Historian's Path in the Pages of The American Journal of Psychology.

Am J Psychol 2017 Summer;130(2):149-162

Although he is best known for his classic textbook, A History of Experimental Psychology, Edwin Garrigues Boring published dozens of articles in The American Journal of Psychology and used its various formats to guide the discipline in the early 20th century. This report reviews a small sample of his publications, including obituaries, notes, and experimental articles, and presents them in historical and biographical context. A central objective is to show how Boring shared the values of his structuralist training with the emerging American schools and how time allowed him to reconsider his approach to history and the legacy of his iconic mentor, Edward Bradford Titchener. Read More

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Margaret F. Washburn in The American Journal of Psychology: A Cognitive Precursor?

Authors:
Jose T Boyano

Am J Psychol 2017 Summer;130(2):133-148

In the early 20th century, Margaret F. Washburn (1871-1939) produced numerous studies on perception, affective value of stimulus, memory, emotions, and consciousness. This experimental work was published in The American Journal of Psychology. Read More

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Scientific Study of Magic: Binet's Pioneering Approach Based on Observations and Chronophotography.

Am J Psychol 2016 Sep;129:313-326

In 1894, French psychologist Alfred Binet (1857-1911) published an article titled "The Psychol- ogy of Prestidigitation" that reported the results of a study conducted in collaboration with two of the best magicians of that period. By using a new method and new observation techniques, Binet was able to reveal some of the psychological mechanisms involved in magic tricks. Our article begins by presenting Binet's method and the principal professional magicians who par- ticipated in his studies. Read More

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September 2016

Child and Ancient Man: How to Define Their Commonalities and Differences.

Am J Psychol 2016 Sep;129:295-312

Developmental psychology is not only a psychology of development from childhood to old age but a psychology of human development in world history. Eighty years of cross-cultural empirical research findings indicate that the adolescent stage of formal operations evolved late in history and is not a universal development of adult humans across cultures and history. Correspondingly, preoperational or concrete operational stages describe adult psychological stages in past or premodern cultures, as Jean Piaget and some of his followers have mentioned. Read More

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September 2016

Adolescent Aggression as Predicted from Parent-Child Relationships and Executive Functions.

Am J Psychol 2016 Sep;129:283-294

Previous research has emphasized the role of parent-child relationships (PCRs) in child and adolescent development. The present study extends the previous findings by examining the direct and mediated relationship between PCRs, executive functioning (EF), and adolescent aggression. Five hundred twelve adolescents of South Asian ethnic background, enrolled at the secondary and higher secondary levels (aged 13-19 years; 50% boys), participated in the study. Read More

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September 2016

The Effect of Collective Transitions on the Organization and Contents of Autobiographical Memory: A Transition Theory Perspective.

Am J Psychol 2016 Sep;129:259-282

In this article, we tirst outline a minimalist approach to the organization ot autobiographical memory called transition theory. This theory assumes that the content and organization of autobiographical memory mirror the structure of experience and reflect the operation of basic memory processes. Thus, this approach rests on an analysis of the environment that emphasizes repetition, co-occurrence, change, and distinctiveness. Read More

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September 2016
4 Reads

The Development and Validity of a Chinese Version of the Compound Remote Associates Test.

Am J Psychol 2016 Sep;129:245-258

Numerous recent studies have used neuroscientific methods such as event-related potentials and functional magnetic resonance imaging to demystify insight and creativity. To do so, 1 key prerequisite is the creation of a large enough number of homogeneous problems that can reliably produce insight-like experiences within a short time window. The Remote Associates Test (RAT) and its variant, the compound remote associate (CRA) problems developed by Bowden and Jung-Beeman (2003), are 2 of the most popular and important instruments for unraveling the behavioral and cognitive, especially electrophysiological and neural, mechanisms of creative thinking and insight. Read More

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September 2016
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The Reactivation of Motion influences Size Categorization in a Visuo-Haptic Illusion.

Am J Psychol 2016 Sep;129:235-243

People simulate themselves moving when they view a picture, read a sentence, or simulate a situation that involves motion. The simulation of motion has often been studied in conceptual tasks such as language comprehension. However, most of these studies investigated the direct influence of motion simulation on tasks inducing motion. Read More

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September 2016
2 Reads

The Cognitive and Perceptual Laws of the Inclined Plane.

Am J Psychol 2016 Sep;129:221-234

The study explored whether laypersons correctly tacitly know Galileo's law of the inclined plane and what the basis of such knowledge could be. Participants predicted the time a ball would take to roll down a slope with factorial combination of ball travel distance and slope angle. The resulting pattern of factorial curves relating the square of predicted time to travel distance for each slope angle was identical to that implied by Galileo's law, indicating a correct cognitive representation of this law. Read More

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September 2016

The Evolution of the American Journal of Psychology, 1904-1918: A Network Investigation.

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(2):185-96

In an earlier article, we used digital historical methods to examine the first 14 volumes (1887-1903) of The American Journal of Psychology (AJP) by creating networks of the vocabularies used in every substantive article the journal published in those years. These networks showed us the major research groups that had been gathered together by the journal's founder-editor, G. Stanley Hall, and how the intellectual composition of the journal (and the discipline) changed over that 17-year period. Read More

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Threatening Men's Mate Value Influences Aggression Toward an Intrasexual Rival: The Moderating Role of Narcissism.

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(2):169-83

Correlational research has linked low mate value (MV)--one's worth as a mating partner to members of the opposite sex--with aggression in men. In 2 experiments, we examined the effects of self-perceived MV on men's reported willingness to aggress directly toward a hypothetical mate poacher (Experiment 1, N = 60) and observable aggression toward a same-sex rival in a laboratory paradigm (Experiment 2, N = 54). In both experiments, the roles of narcissism in moderating the effect of MV condition on subsequent aggression were examined. Read More

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July 2016
3 Reads

Texting Dependence, iPod Dependence, and Delay Discounting.

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(2):161-8

We gave 127 undergraduates questionnaires about their iPod and texting dependence and 2 hypothetical delay discounting scenarios related to free downloaded songs and free texting for life. Using regression analyses we found that when iPod dependence was the dependent variable, Text2-excessive use, Text4-psychological and behavioral symptoms, iPod2-excessive use, and iPod3-relationship disruption were significant predictors of discounting. When texting dependence was the dependent variable, Text4-psychological and behavioral symptoms and iPod3-relationship disruption were significant predictors of discounting. Read More

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July 2016
3 Reads

Effects of Working Memory Capacity and Domain Knowledge on Recall for Grocery Prices.

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(2):149-60

Hambrick and Engle (2002) proposed 3 models of how domain knowledge and working memory capacity may work together to influence episodic memory: a "rich-get-richer" model, a "building blocks" model, and a "compensatory" model. Their results supported the rich-get-richer model, although later work by Hambrick and Oswald (2005) found support for a building blocks model. We investigated the effects of domain knowledge and working memory on recall of studied grocery prices. Read More

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July 2016
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Category Membership and Semantic Coding in the Cerebral Hemispheres.

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(2):135-48

Although a gradient of category membership seems to form the internal structure of semantic categories, it is unclear whether the 2 hemispheres of the brain differ in terms of this gradient. The 2 experiments reported here examined this empirical question and explored alternative theoretical interpretations. Participants viewed category names centrally and determined whether a closely related or distantly related word presented to either the left visual field/right hemisphere (LVF/RH) or the right visual field/left hemisphere (RVF/LH) was a member of the category. Read More

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July 2016
2 Reads

Effects of Music and Tonal Language Experience on Relative Pitch Performance.

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(2):125-34

We examined the interaction between music and tone language experience as related to relative pitch processing by having participants judge the direction and magnitude of pitch changes in a relative pitch task. Participants' performance on this relative pitch task was assessed using the Cochran-Weiss-Shanteau (CWS) index of expertise, based on a ratio of discrimination over consistency in participants' relative pitch judgments. Testing took place in 2 separate sessions on different days to assess the effects of practice on participants' performance. Read More

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July 2016
2 Reads

A New Law for Time Perception.

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(2):111-24

Effects of sex and handedness on the perception of temporal durations from 1 to 20 s were studied. A total of 80 male and 40 female participants were divided equally into left-handed and right-handed subgroups. Using an empty interval production procedure, each person estimated durations of 1, 3, 7, and 20 s, respectively, 50 times each. Read More

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Self-Objectification and the Use of Body Image Coping Strategies: The Role of Shame in Highly Physically Active Women.

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(1):81-90

We investigated the mediating role of body shame in the relationship between self-objectification and body image coping strategies in highly physically active university women. Bivariate correlations revealed body shame was positively related to self-objectification, appearance fixing, and avoidance coping but unrelated to positive rational acceptance. In addition, self-objectification was positively related to appearance fixing and avoidance coping but unrelated to positive rational acceptance. Read More

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Psychodynamic Emotional Regulation in View of Wolpe's Desensitization Model.

Authors:
Merav Rabinovich

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(1):65-79

The current research belongs to the stream of theoretical integration and establishes a theoretical platform for integrative psychotherapy in anxiety disorders. Qualitative metasynthesis procedures were applied to 40 peer-reviewed psychoanalytic articles involving emotional regulation. The concept of psychodynamic emotional regulation was found to be connected with the categories of desensitization, gradual exposure, containment, and transference. Read More

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Familiarity and Aptness in Metaphor Comprehension.

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(1):49-64

The career of metaphor hypothesis suggests that novel metaphors are understood through a search for shared features between the topic and vehicle, but with repeated exposure, the figurative meaning is understood directly as a new category is established. The categorization hypothesis argues that instead good or apt metaphors are understood through a categorization process, whether or not they are familiar. Only poor metaphors ever invoke a literal comparison. Read More

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April 2016
7 Reads

Word Frequency Effects for LEET Lettering in Word Recognition.

Authors:
Jeremy W Grabbe

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(1):37-47

Letter substitution has been shown to have a cost to word recognition performance, such as increased reaction time. The use of orthographically similar numbers or symbols as a substitute for letters is known as LEET. Perea, Duñabeitia, and Carreiras (2008) showed that word recognition was not affected when LEET substitutions were used as primes. Read More

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April 2016
2 Reads

The Face Inversion Effect: Roles of First- and Second-Order Configural Information.

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(1):23-35

The face inversion effect (FIE) is a reduction in recognition performance for inverted faces compared with upright faces. Several studies have proposed that a type of configural information, called second-order relational information, becomes more important with increasing expertise and gives rise to the FIE. However, recently it has been demonstrated that it is possible to obtain an FIE with facial features presented in isolation, showing that configural information is not necessary for this effect to occur. Read More

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April 2016
1 Read

Does Number of Perceptions or Cross-Modal Auditory Cueing Influence Audiovisual Processing Speed?

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(1):11-21

What factors contribute to redundant target processing speed besides statistical facilitation? One possibility is that multiple percepts may drive these effects. Another, although not mutually exclusive hypothesis, is that cross-channel cueing from one modality to another may influence response times. We implemented an auditory-visual detection task using the sound-induced flash illusion to examine whether one or both of these possibilities contributes to changes in processing speed; we did so by examining the data of individual participants. Read More

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April 2016
5 Reads

There Is Time for Calculation in Speed Chess, and Calculation Accuracy Increases With Expertise.

Am J Psychol 2016 ;129(1):1-9

The recognition-action theory of chess skill holds that expertise in chess is due primarily to the ability to recognize familiar patterns of pieces. Despite its widespread acclaim, empirical evidence for this theory is indirect. One source of indirect evidence is that there is a high correlation between speed chess and standard chess. Read More

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April 2016
3 Reads

Comparative Study of Personality Trait Characteristics and Reactivity in Schizophrenia Using a Film Clip Paradigm.

Am J Psychol 2015 ;128(4):515-26

The empirical examination of personality characteristics related to the experience of strong negative emotions and the associated physiological response may help account for idiosyncratic responses to life events in schizophrenia. The current study examines the relationship between levels of neuroticism and arousability and physiological and emotional reactivity during the viewing of film clips with differing emotional valance. Data were collected on emotional and cardiovascular and cortisol reactivity across experimental conditions for a sample of outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia and a comparison group of nonpsychiatric controls. Read More

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Do Psychological Sex Differences Reflect Evolutionary Bisexual Partitioning?

Authors:
Irina Trofimova

Am J Psychol 2015 ;128(4):485-514

This article analyzes sex differences in communicative and exploratory abilities and mental disabilities from the rarely discussed perspective of sex differences in the shape of phenotypic distributions. The article reviews the most consistent findings related to such differences and compares them with the evolutionary theory of sex (ETS). The ETS considers sexual dimorphism as a functional specialization of a species into 2 partitions: variational and conservational. Read More

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April 2016
2 Reads

Homogenization of Classification Functions Measurement (HOCFUN): A Method for Measuring the Salience of Emotional Arousal in Thinking.

Am J Psychol 2015 ;128(4):469-83

The problem of the measurement of emotion is a widely debated one. In this article we propose an instrument, the Homogenization of Classification Functions Measure (HOCFUN), designed for assessing the influence of emotional arousal on a rating task consisting of the evaluation of a sequence of images. The instrument defines an indicator (κ) that measures the degree of homogenization of the ratings given over 2 rating scales (pleasant-unpleasant and relevant-irrelevant). Read More

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April 2016
2 Reads

Need for Cognition and False Memory: Can One's Natural Processing Style Be Manipulated by External Factors?

Am J Psychol 2015 ;128(4):459-68

The purpose of this experiment was to provide an enhanced understanding of need for cognition (NFC) and its influence on one's memory accuracy. People who are high in NFC tend to put more cognitive effort into their mental processes than their low-NFC counterparts. To determine whether one's natural processing tendencies, as determined by NFC, can be influenced by external factors, manipulations to levels of processing were added. Read More

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April 2016
2 Reads

Effects of Memory Load and Test Position on Short-Duration Sustained Attention Tasks.

Am J Psychol 2015 ;128(4):445-58

The current study applies a dual-task working memory and vigilance task to examine sustained attention performance and perceived workload in a multi-instrument battery. In Experiment 1 we modified a task developed by Helton and Russell (2011) to examine declines in performance and to assess the effects of its position within a larger battery. Experiment 1 failed to reveal a sensitivity decrement, and test position revealed only spurious influence. Read More

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April 2016
1 Read

Reconsidering Food Reward, Brain Stimulation, and Dopamine: Incentives Act Forward.

Am J Psychol 2015 ;128(4):431-44

In operant conditioning, rats pressing levers and pigeons pecking keys depend on contingent food reinforcement. Food reward agrees with Skinner's behaviorism, undergraduate textbooks, and folk psychology. However, nearly a century of experimental evidence shows, instead, that food in an operant conditioning chamber acts forward to evoke species-specific feeding behavior rather than backward to reinforce experimenter-defined responses. Read More

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Action Memory and Encoding Time: Evidence for a Strategic View of Action Memory Processing.

Am J Psychol 2015 ;128(4):419-29

The enactment effect is the phenomenon whereby carrying out a simple action phrase results in superior memory compared with listening to the phrase or observing someone else carry out the action. Several early studies suggested that action memory processing is less effortful and strategic compared with traditional verbal processing, a perspective that is still argued today. In the current study, we reexamine a particularly compelling finding in support of this view (Cohen, 1985). Read More

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April 2016
46 Reads

A Way Forward Beyond Karl Popper's and Donald T. Campbell's Dead-End Evolutionary Epistemologies.

Authors:
John Wettersten

Am J Psychol 2016 Winter;129(4):461-477

Theories of natural thought processes have traditionally served as foundations for philosophies of science. The source of all knowledge is passively received observations; these are combined to produce certain knowledge. After David Hume showed that this was not possible, deductivist alternatives, that is, theories that find a source of knowledge in ideas not derived from observations, from Immanuel Kant to William Whewell in the mid-1 9th century, were introduced. Read More

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Hierarchical Mazes in Psychological Research.

Authors:
Tomasz R Pasek

Am J Psychol 2016 Winter;129(4):443-459

Hierarchical mazes have been used in psychology for more than 100 years. During this time many different maze tasks have been created and used to test.cognitive processes and distinguish personality traits. Read More

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April 2018
4 Reads

Modeling Impulsivity in Forensic Patients: A Three-Dimensional Model of Impulsivity.

Am J Psychol 2016 Winter;129(4):429-441

The current study investigated whether a multidimensional model could underlie impulsivity and its associations with various disorders in a forensic sample. Data were available from self-report and behavioral impulsivity instruments of 87 forensic patients. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to derive a dimensional impulsivity model, and the relationship between and possible predictive validity of impulsivity dimensions for psychopathology was investigated using product moment correlations and regression analysis. Read More

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April 2018
1 Read

Event-Based Prospective Memory Is Resistant but Not Immune to Proactive Interference.

Am J Psychol 2016 Winter;129(4):419-427

Recent evidence suggests that proactive interference (PI) does not hurt event-based prospective memory (ProM) the way it does retrospective memory (RetroM) (Oates, Peynircioglu, & Bates, 2015). We investigated this apparent resistance further. Introduction of a distractor task to ensure we were testing ProM rather than vigilance in Experiment 1 and tripling the number of lists to provide more opportunity for PI buildup in Experiment 2 still did not produce performance decrements. Read More

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April 2018
1 Read

Do Format Differences in the Presentation of Information Affect Susceptibility to Memory Distortions? The Three-Stage Misinformation Procedure Reconsidered.

Am J Psychol 2016 Winter;129(4):407-417

To date most studies within the misinformation paradigm have used the visual presentation of a to-be-remembered event that is later tested verbally or visually. However, the well-established encoding specificity hypothesis predicts that congruence between encoding and test phases should lead to fewer memory errors. In Study 1, we examined the susceptibility to misinformation after encoding original information in 1 of 4 different formats: as a film, slides, and as a written or auditory narrative. Read More

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Repetition Priming Magnitude Depends on Affirmative Prime Responses: A Test of Two Congruity Explanations.

Am J Psychol 2016 Winter;129(4):391-405

We conducted 2 experiments to evaluate the impact of positive prime responses on repetition priming effects while decoupling this impact from content congruity and specific evaluation operations. Our first experiment consisted of word-meaning comparison trials that required participants to evaluate synonyms or antonyms. A crossing of evaluation operation with semantic content allowed us to test the goal-content congruity hypothesis against the semantic congruity explanation for greater facilitation from positive response primes. Read More

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