25,445 results match your criteria American Journal Of Psychiatry[Journal]


Infant Visual Brain Development and Inherited Genetic Liability in Autism.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 May 26:appiajp21101002. Epub 2022 May 26.

Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities (Girault, Forsen, Shen, Hazlett, Piven), Department of Psychiatry (Girault, Shen, Kim, Hazlett, Styner, Piven), Department of Biostatistics (Donovan, Truong), and ; Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences (Hawks) and Department of Psychiatry (Talovic, Nishino, Davis, Botteron, Todorov, Pruett, Constantino), Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis; Institute of Child Development (Elison) and Department of Psychology, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Tex. (Swanson); Department of Radiology, Washington University in St. Louis (Snyder, McKinstry); Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Washington, Seattle (Estes, St. John); Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle (Dager); Tandon School of Engineering, New York University, New York (Gerig); Center for Autism Research, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia (Pandey, Schultz); Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada (Zwaigenbaum).

Objective: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is heritable, and younger siblings of ASD probands are at higher likelihood of developing ASD themselves. Prospective MRI studies of siblings report that atypical brain development precedes ASD diagnosis, although the link between brain maturation and genetic factors is unclear. Given that familial recurrence of ASD is predicted by higher levels of ASD traits in the proband, the authors investigated associations between proband ASD traits and brain development among younger siblings. Read More

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Evaluation of Antipsychotic Reduction Efforts in Patients With Dementia in Veterans Health Administration Nursing Homes.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 May 26:appiajp21060591. Epub 2022 May 26.

Department of Psychiatry and Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Gerlach, Maust, Zivin); Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor (Maust, Chang, Kim, Zivin); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, UC Davis Health, Sacramento (Kales); Center for Statistical Consulting and Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Kim); Office of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (Wiechers); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California San Francisco (Wiechers); Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn. (Wiechers).

Objective: The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) each created initiatives to reduce off-label use of antipsychotics in patients with dementia in nursing homes. Although CMS has reported antipsychotic reductions, the impact on prescribing of antipsychotic and other CNS-active medications in the VHA remains unclear. The authors evaluated national trends in antipsychotic and other CNS-active medication prescribing for nursing home patients with dementia in the VHA. Read More

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The Intergenerational Impact of Structural Racism and Cumulative Trauma on Depression.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 Jun;179(6):434-440

Department of Psychiatry (Hankerson, Yehuda) and Department of Population Health Sciences and Policy (Hankerson), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York; Department of Medicine (Moise, Wilson) and Department of Psychiatry (Waller, Duarte, Lugo-Candelas, Wainberg), Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York; City University of New York (Wilson); New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York (Waller, Duarte, Lugo-Candelas, Wainberg, Weissman); Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Perelman School of Medicine and Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (Arnold); Department of Psychiatry, Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York (Weissman); James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, N.Y. (Yehuda); Department of Psychiatry, University of California, Davis (Shim).

Depression among individuals who have been racially and ethnically minoritized in the United States can be vastly different from that of non-Hispanic White Americans. For example, African American adults who have depression rate their symptoms as more severe, have a longer course of illness, and experience more depression-associated disability. The purpose of this review was to conceptualize how structural racism and cumulative trauma can be fundamental drivers of the intergenerational transmission of depression. Read More

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Structural Racism and the Imperative to Eliminate Mental Health Disparities.

Authors:
Ned H Kalin

Am J Psychiatry 2022 Jun;179(6):395

Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison.

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Innovative Directions to Advance Mental Health Disparities Research.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 Jun;179(6):397-401

Office for Disparities Research and Workforce Diversity, NIMH, Bethesda, Md. (Barksdale); National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, NIH, Bethesda, Md. (Barksdale, Pérez-Stable); NIMH, Bethesda, Md. (Gordon).

Disparities in mental health have persisted or worsened despite our awareness of their existence, increased understanding of their causes, and efforts at reduction and mitigation. Although much is known, there is still much to be done in mental health research to meaningfully impact disparities. In November 2020, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) co-sponsored a virtual workshop to explore the complexities of mental health disparities, which revealed several gaps and opportunities for the field to pursue to advance mental health disparities research. Read More

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Mental Health Disparities Research: An Introduction to New Directions.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 Jun;179(6):396

National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.

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A New Agenda for Optimizing Investments in Community Mental Health and Reducing Disparities.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 Jun;179(6):402-416

Disparities Research Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (Alegría, Zhen-Duan, O'Malley); Department of Medicine (Alegría, Zhen-Duan) and Department of Psychiatry (Alegría), Harvard Medical School, Boston; Department of Psychology, Florida International University, Miami (DiMarzio).

The Biden-Harris Administration's FY22 budget includes $1.6 billion for the Community Mental Health Services Block Grant program, more than double the FY21 allocation, given the rising mental health crises observed across the nation. This is timely since there have been two interrelated paradigm shifts: one giving attention to the role of the environmental context as central in mental health outcomes, the other moving upstream to earlier mental health interventions at the community level rather than only at the individual level. Read More

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Perspectives From the National Institutes of Health on Multidimensional Mental Health Disparities Research: A Framework for Advancing the Field.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 Jun;179(6):417-421

Office of Disease Prevention, NIH, Bethesda, Md. (Alvidrez); Office for Disparities Research and Workforce Diversity, NIMH, Bethesda, Md. (Barksdale); National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, NIH, Bethesda, Md. (Barksdale).

Racial, ethnic, and other mental health disparities have been documented for several decades. However, progress in reducing or eliminating these disparities has been slow. In this review, the authors argue that understanding and addressing mental health disparities requires using a multidimensional lens that encompasses a wide array of social determinants of health at individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and societal levels. Read More

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Effect of AXS-05 (Dextromethorphan-Bupropion) in Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized Double-Blind Controlled Trial.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 May 18:appiajp21080800. Epub 2022 May 18.

Axsome Therapeutics, Inc., New York (Tabuteau, Jones, Anderson, Jacobson); Nathan Kline Institute and New York University School of Medicine, New York (Iosifescu).

Objective: Altered glutamatergic neurotransmission is implicated in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder. AXS-05 (dextromethorphan-bupropion) is an oral NMDA receptor antagonist and sigma-1 receptor agonist, which utilizes inhibition of CYP2D6 to increase its bioavailability. This phase 2 trial assessed the efficacy and safety of dextromethorphan-bupropion in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Read More

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Predictive Value of Acute Neuroplastic Response to rTMS in Treatment Outcome in Depression: A Concurrent TMS-fMRI Trial.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 May 18:appiajp21050541. Epub 2022 May 18.

Non-Invasive Neurostimulation Therapies Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Ge, Humaira, Gregory, Alamian, Vila-Rodriguez); Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Ge, Humaira, Gregory, Alamian, Todd, Frangou, Vila-Rodriguez); UBC MRI Research Centre, Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Barlow, MacMillan); SFU ImageTech Lab, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver (MacMillan); Philips Canada, Mississauga, Ont. (MacMillan); Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto (Nestor); Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York (Frangou).

Objective: The study objective was to investigate the predictive value of functional connectivity changes induced by acute repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for clinical response in treatment-resistant depression.

Methods: Cross-sectional changes in functional connectivity induced by a single concurrent rTMS-fMRI session were assessed in 38 outpatients with treatment-resistant depression (26 of them female; mean age, 41.87 years) who subsequently underwent a 4-week course of rTMS. Read More

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Longitudinal Trajectory of the Link Between Ventral Striatum and Depression in Adolescence.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 May 18:appiajp20081180. Epub 2022 May 18.

Department of Psychiatry, Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (Pan, Sato); National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, São Paulo, Brazil (Pan, Sato); Section on Neurobiology of Fear and Anxiety, NIMH, Bethesda, Md. (Pan, Westwater, Grillon, Ernst); Mathematics and Statistics Institute, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, Brazil (Sato); Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, INSERM U 1299 "Trajectoires développementales en psychiatrie," Ecole Normale Supérieure Paris-Saclay, Université Paris-Saclay, Université Paris Cité, CNRS, Centre Borelli, Gif-sur-Yvette, France (Paillère Martinot, Martinot, Artiges); AP-HP Sorbonne Université, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris (Paillère Martinot); Department of Psychiatry, EPS Barthélemy Durand, Etampes, France (Artiges); Department of Social and Health Care, Psychosocial Services Adolescent Outpatient Clinic Kauppakatu 14, Lahti, Finland (Penttilä); Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany (Grimmer, Banaschewski); MSB Medical School Berlin, Department of Psychology and Psychotherapy, Berlin (van Noort); Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center, Göttingen, Germany (Becker); Discipline of Psychiatry, School of Medicine and Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin (Bokde); Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS), Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, SGDP Centre, King's College London (Desrivières, Poustka); Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany, and Department of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, University of Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany (Flor); Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington (Garavan); Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig and Berlin, Germany (Ittermann); Institute of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany (Nees); NeuroSpin, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France (Papadopoulos Orfanos); Department of Psychiatry and Neuroimaging Center, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany (Fröhner); School of Psychology and Global Brain Health Institute, Trinity College Dublin (Whelan); Center for Population Neuroscience and Stratified Medicine (PONS), ISTBI, Fudan University Shanghai, and Charité Mental Health, Berlin (Schumann); Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Herchel Smith Building, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, U.K. (Westwater); Department of Education, ICT, and Learning, Østfold University College, Halden, Norway (Cogo-Moreira); Division of Psychiatry, University College London, and National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens (Stringaris).

Objective: Research in adolescent depression has found aberrant intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) among the ventral striatum (VS) and several brain regions implicated in reward processing. The present study probes this question by taking advantage of the availability of data from a large youth cohort, the IMAGEN Consortium.

Methods: iFC data from 303 adolescents (48% of them female) were used to examine associations of VS connectivity at baseline (at age 14) with depressive disorders at baseline and at 2-year (N=250) and 4-year (N=219) follow-ups. Read More

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Lack of Representation in Psychiatric Research: A Data-Driven Example From Scientific Articles Published in 2019 and 2020 in the .

Am J Psychiatry 2022 May;179(5):388-392

Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh.

Objective: The authors examined representation and accuracy of descriptions of sociodemographic identities in psychiatric research through quantifying data contained in recently published articles from a high-impact psychiatry journal.

Methods: Sociodemographic data were aggregated from articles (i.e. Read More

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An Update on Community Ketamine Practices.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 May;179(5):393-394

Menninger Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (O'Brien, Mathew); Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn. (Wilkinson); Mental Health Care Line, Michael E. Debakey VA Medical Center, Houston, The Menninger Clinic, Houston (Mathew).

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To Model Developmental Risk in a Dish.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 May;179(5):319-321

Lieber Institute for Brain Development Maltz Research Laboratories, Johns Hopkins Medical Campus, Baltimore (Erwin, Weinberger); Departments of Psychiatry (Weinberger), Neurology (Erwin, Weinberger), Neuroscience (Erwin, Weinberger), and Genetic Medicine (Weinberger), Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore.

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Cannabis and Brain Health: What Is Next for Developmental Cohort Studies?

Am J Psychiatry 2022 May;179(5):317-318

Department of Psychiatry and Addiction, University of Montreal, CHUSJ Research Centre, Montreal, Canada.

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From the Early Emergence of Psychiatry to Stem Cells and Neural Organoids.

Authors:
Ned H Kalin

Am J Psychiatry 2022 May;179(5):313-316

Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison.

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Using Stem Cell Models to Explore the Genetics Underlying Psychiatric Disorders: Linking Risk Variants, Genes, and Biology in Brain Disease.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 May;179(5):322-328

Department of Psychiatry, Department of Genetics, Wu Tsai Institute at Yale, and Yale Stem Cell Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.

There is an urgent and unmet need to advance our ability to translate genetic studies of psychiatric disorders into clinically actionable information, which could transform diagnostics and even one day lead to novel (and potentially presymptomatic) therapeutic interventions. Today, although there are hundreds of significant loci associated with psychiatric disorders, resolving the target gene(s) and pathway(s) impacted by each is a major challenge. Integrating human induced pluripotent stem cell-based approaches with CRISPR-mediated genomic engineering strategies makes it possible to study the impact of patient-specific variants within the cell types of the brain. Read More

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Digital Intervention for Cognitive Deficits in Major Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Assess Efficacy and Safety in Adults.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 Apr 12:appiajp21020125. Epub 2022 Apr 12.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C. (Keefe); VeraSci, Durham, N.C. (Keefe); Akili Interactive, Boston (Cañadas, Farlow); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. (Etkin); Alto Neuroscience, Los Altos, Calif. (Etkin).

Objective: The authors evaluated AKL-T03, an investigational digital intervention delivered through a video game-based interface, designed to target the fronto-parietal network to enhance functional domains for attentional control. AKL-T03 was tested in adult patients with major depressive disorder and a demonstrated cognitive impairment at baseline.

Methods: Adults ages 25-55 years on a stable antidepressant medication regimen with residual mild to moderate depression and an objective impairment in cognition (as measured using the symbol coding test) were enrolled in a double-blind randomized controlled study. Read More

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Schizophrenia Imaging Signatures and Their Associations With Cognition, Psychopathology, and Genetics in the General Population.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 Apr 12:appiajp21070686. Epub 2022 Apr 12.

Center for Biomedical Image Computing and Analytics (Chand, Wen, Erus, Doshi, Srinivasan, Mamourian, Varol, Sotiras, Hwang, Fan, Satterthwaite, Wolf, Davatzikos, Shinohara, Shou), Department of Radiology (Chand, Wen, Erus, Doshi, Srinivasan, Mamourian, Varol, Sotiras, Hwang, Fan, R.E. Gur, R.C. Gur, Davatzikos), Department of Genetics (Singhal, Verma, Ritchie), Department of Psychiatry (Kaczkurkin, Moore, Calkins, R.E. Gur, R.C. Gur, Satterthwaite, Wolf), and Penn Statistics in Imaging and Visualization Center, Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Informatics (Shinohara, Shou), Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Chand, Sotiras), and Institute of Informatics (Sotiras), Washington University in St. Louis; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich (Dwyer, Koutsouleris); Department of Statistics, Zuckerman Institute, Columbia University, New York (Varol); Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London (Dazzan); Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York (Kahn); Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands (Schnack); Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (Zanetti, Busatto); Hospital Sírio-Libanês, São Paulo, Brazil (Zanetti); LVR-Klinikum Düsseldorf, Kliniken der Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf, Germany (Meisenzahl); Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University Hospital Virgen del Rocio, IBiS-CIBERSAM, University of Sevilla, Spain (Crespo-Facorro); Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne and Melbourne Health, Carlton South, Australia (Pantelis); Orygen, National Centre of Excellence for Youth Mental Health, Melbourne, Australia, and Centre for Youth Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia (Wood); School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, U.K. (Wood); Department of Psychiatric Neuroimaging Genetics and Comorbidity Laboratory, Nankai University Affiliated Tianjin Anding Hospital, and Department of Psychiatry, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China (Zhuo); Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville (Kaczkurkin); Lifespan Brain Institute of Penn Medicine and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (Moore, Calkins, R.E. Gur, R.C. Gur, Satterthwaite).

Objective: The prevalence and significance of schizophrenia-related phenotypes at the population level is debated in the literature. Here, the authors assessed whether two recently reported neuroanatomical signatures of schizophrenia-signature 1, with widespread reduction of gray matter volume, and signature 2, with increased striatal volume-could be replicated in an independent schizophrenia sample, and investigated whether expression of these signatures can be detected at the population level and how they relate to cognition, psychosis spectrum symptoms, and schizophrenia genetic risk.

Methods: This cross-sectional study used an independent schizophrenia-control sample (N=347; ages 16-57 years) for replication of imaging signatures, and then examined two independent population-level data sets: typically developing youths and youths with psychosis spectrum symptoms in the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (N=359; ages 16-23 years) and adults in the UK Biobank study (N=836; ages 44-50 years). Read More

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Defining Recovery From Alcohol Use Disorder: Development of an NIAAA Research Definition.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 Apr 12:appiajp21090963. Epub 2022 Apr 12.

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, Md.

The objective of this article is to provide an operational definition of recovery from alcohol use disorder (AUD) to facilitate the consistency of research on recovery and stimulate further research. The construct of recovery has been difficult to operationalize in the alcohol treatment and recovery literature. Several formal definitions of recovery have been developed but have limitations because 1) they require abstinence from both alcohol and substance use, 2) they do not include the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for AUD as part of the recovery process (i. Read More

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20-Year Prospective, Sequential Follow-Up Study of Heterogeneity in Associations of Duration of Untreated Psychosis With Symptoms, Functioning, and Quality of Life Following First-Episode Psychosis.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 04;179(4):288-297

DETECT Early Intervention in Psychosis Service, Dublin (O'Keeffe, Clarke); School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin (Kinsella, Waddington); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Translational Research and Therapy for Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou, China (Waddington); School of Medicine, University College Dublin (Clarke).

Objective: Determining the extent to which relationships between duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and outcome endure longitudinally across the lifetime course of psychotic illness requires prospective, systematic studies of epidemiologically representative incidence cohorts across decades. Transience, persistence, or heterogeneity in associations between DUP and distinct outcome domains are yet to be investigated over such time frames.

Methods: Prospective, sequential follow-up studies of an epidemiologically representative first-episode psychosis incidence cohort in Ireland were conducted at 6 months and 4, 8, 12, and 20 years (N=171). Read More

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Opioid Prescribing and the Very Human Toll of Drug Harms.

Authors:
Maree Teesson

Am J Psychiatry 2022 04;179(4):264-266

Matilda Centre for Research in Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

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Synaptic Variability and Cortical Gamma Oscillation Power in Schizophrenia.

Am J Psychiatry 2022 04;179(4):277-287

Translational Neuroscience Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh.

Objective: Cognitive impairments in schizophrenia are associated with lower gamma oscillation power in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Gamma power depends in part on excitatory drive to fast-spiking parvalbumin interneurons (PVIs). Excitatory drive to cortical neurons varies in strength, which could affect how these neurons regulate network oscillations. Read More

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Integrating Clinical and Basic Research: Opioid Use Disorder, Psychotic Illnesses, and Prefrontal Microcircuits Relevant to Schizophrenia.

Authors:
Ned H Kalin

Am J Psychiatry 2022 04;179(4):255-258

Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison.

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Reducing Duration of Untreated Psychosis: The Neglected Dimension of Early Intervention Services.

Authors:
Ashok Malla

Am J Psychiatry 2022 04;179(4):259-261

Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Canada.

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Transforming Discoveries About Cortical Microcircuits and Gamma Oscillations Into New Treatments for Cognitive Deficits in Schizophrenia.

Authors:
Vikaas S Sohal

Am J Psychiatry 2022 04;179(4):267-276

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Weill Institute for Neurosciences, and Kavli Institute for Fundamental Neuroscience, University of California, San Francisco.

The major cause of disability in schizophrenia is cognitive impairment, which remains largely refractory to existing treatments. This reflects the fact that antipsychotics and other therapies have not been designed to address specific brain abnormalities that cause cognitive impairment. This overview proposes that understanding how specific cellular and synaptic loci within cortical microcircuits contribute to cortical gamma oscillations may reveal treatments for cognitive impairment. Read More

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