12 results match your criteria American Journal Of Political Science[Journal]

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The Influence of Major Life Events on Economic Attitudes in a World of Gene-Environment Interplay.

Authors:
Peter K Hatemi

Am J Pol Sci 2013 Oct;57(4):987-1007

Associate Professor, Political Science, Microbiology and Biochemistry, Research Fellow, The United States Studies Centre, University of Sydney Pennsylvania State University, 307 Pond Lab, University Park, PA 16802.

The role of "genes" on political attitudes has gained attention across disciplines. However, person-specific experiences have yet to be incorporated into models that consider genetic influences. Relying on a gene-environment interplay approach, this study explicates how life-events, such as losing one's job or suffering a financial loss, influence economic policy attitudes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajps.12037DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4031194PMC
October 2013

The Impact of Elections on Cooperation: Evidence from a Lab-in-the-Field Experiment in Uganda.

Am J Pol Sci 2012 Oct;56(4):964-985

Department of Political Science, 225 Stiteler Hall, 208 S. 37th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6215 ( ).

Communities often rely on sanctioning to induce public goods contributions. Past studies focus on how external agencies or peer sanctioning induce cooperation. In this article, we focus instead on the role played by centralized authorities, internal to the community. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-5907.2012.00596.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3666592PMC
October 2012
1 Read

Remembering and Voting: Theory and Evidence from Amnesic Patients.

Am J Pol Sci 2012 Oct;56(4):837-848

University of Illinois, Department of Psychology, 603 East Daniel Street, Champaign, IL 61820.

One of the most prominent claims to emerge from the field of public opinion is that citizens can vote for candidates whose issue positions best reflect their own beliefs even when they cannot remember previously learned stances associated with the candidates. The current experiment provides a unique and powerful examination of this claim by determining whether individuals with profound amnesia, whose severe memory impairments prevent them from remembering specific issue information associated with any particular candidate, can vote for candidates whose issue positions come closest to their own political views. We report here that amnesic patients, despite not being able to remember any issue information, consistently voted for candidates with favored political positions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-5907.2012.00608.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3917545PMC
October 2012
7 Reads

Welfare policymaking and intersections of race, ethnicity, and gender in U.S. state legislatures.

Am J Pol Sci 2012 ;56(1):131-47

Emory University.

Welfare policy in the American states has been shaped profoundly by race, ethnicity, and representation. Does gender matter as well? Focusing on state welfare reform in the mid-1990s, we test hypotheses derived from two alternative approaches to incorporating gender into the study of representation and welfare policymaking. An additive approach, which assumes gender and race/ethnicity are distinct and independent, suggests that female state legislators—regardless of race/ethnicity—will mitigate the more restrictive and punitive aspects of welfare reform, much like their African American and Latino counterparts do. Read More

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October 2012

The complications of controlling agency time discretion: FDA review deadlines and postmarket drug safety.

Am J Pol Sci 2012 ;56(1):98-114

Harvard University.

Public agencies have discretion on the time domain, and politicians deploy numerous policy instruments to constrain it. Yet little is known about how administrative procedures that affect timing also affect the quality of agency decisions. We examine whether administrative deadlines shape decision timing and the observed quality of decisions. Read More

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October 2012
1 Read

Polarizing cues.

Am J Pol Sci 2012 ;56(1):52-66

University of California, Merced.

People categorize themselves and others, creating ingroup and outgroup distinctions. In American politics, parties constitute the in- and outgroups, and party leaders hold sway in articulating party positions. A party leader's endorsement of a policy can be persuasive, inducing co-partisans to take the same position. Read More

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October 2012

Correlation not causation: the relationship between personality traits and political ideologies.

Am J Pol Sci 2012 ;56(1):34-51

Virginia Commonwealth University.

The assumption in the personality and politics literature is that a person's personality motivates them to develop certain political attitudes later in life. This assumption is founded on the simple correlation between the two constructs and the observation that personality traits are genetically influenced and develop in infancy, whereas political preferences develop later in life. Work in psychology, behavioral genetics, and recently political science, however, has demonstrated that political preferences also develop in childhood and are equally influenced by genetic factors. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3809096PMC
October 2012
7 Reads

Biology, ideology, and epistemology: how do we know political attitudes are inherited and why should we care?

Am J Pol Sci 2012 ;56(1):17-33

University of Nebraska, Lincoln.

Evidence that political attitudes and behavior are in part biologically and even genetically instantiated is much discussed in political science of late. Yet the classic twin design, a primary source of evidence on this matter, has been criticized for being biased toward finding genetic influence. In this article, we employ a new data source to test empirically the alternative, exclusively environmental, explanations for ideological similarities between twins. Read More

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October 2012
4 Reads

Social welfare as small-scale help: evolutionary psychology and the deservingness heuristic.

Am J Pol Sci 2012 ;56(1):1-16

Aarhus University, Denmark.

Public opinion concerning social welfare is largely driven by perceptions of recipient deservingness. Extant research has argued that this heuristic is learned from a variety of cultural, institutional, and ideological sources. The present article provides evidence supporting a different view: that the deservingness heuristic is rooted in psychological categories that evolved over the course of human evolution to regulate small-scale exchanges of help. Read More

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October 2012
1 Read

The Senate Electoral Cycle and Bicameral Appropriations Politics.

Am J Pol Sci 2009 ;53(2):343-359

Harvard University.

We consider the consequences of the Senate electoral cycle and bicameralism for distributive politics, introducing the concept of contested credit claiming, i.e. that members of a state's House and Senate delegations must share the credit for appropriations that originate in their chamber with delegation members in the other chamber. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-5907.2009.00374.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2699185PMC
January 2009
6 Reads

The war-weariness hypothesis: an empirical test.

Authors:
J S Levy T C Morgan

Am J Pol Sci 1986 ;30(1):26-49

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