3,202 results match your criteria American Journal Of Pharmaceutical Education[Journal]


Implementation Science to Advance Practice and Curricular Transformation: Report of the 2019-2020 AACP Research and Graduate Affairs Committee.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe848204

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Arlington, Virginia.

The 2019-2020 AACP Research and Graduate Affairs Committee (RGAC) was charged with articulating the case for and evaluating the state of implementation science in academic pharmacy, given the potential for implementation science to act as a driver of practice and curricular transformation. Based on the current state of pharmacy research in this area, the RGAC was further charged with outlining a plan to raise the profile of implementation science with pharmacy leadership and defining strategies for AACP to facilitate schools in applying its methods to their practice and education missions. For this work, the RGAC considered implementation science to be the scientific study of methods and strategies to promote adoption of evidence-based practices and interventions into real world settings and routine practice, to improve the quality and effectiveness of services. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

PioneerRx Pharmacist eCare Plan Workgroup.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe8396

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Arlington, Virginia.

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Meet the President: Anne Lin, PharmD.

Authors:

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe8367

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Advancing Our Pharmacy Reformation - Accelerating Education and Practice Transformation: Report of the 2019-2020 Argus Commission.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe8205

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Arlington, Virginia.

The Argus Commission examined changes that should be considered by colleges and schools of pharmacy to meet the bold aim of better integrating pharmacists' and physicians' practices articulated by President Sorensen. The Commission assessed the readiness of pharmacy educators to contribute to the acceleration of practice transformation. The primary focus of the report is on how the doctor of pharmacy curriculum and post-graduate training might be modified and better aligned to ensure that graduates complete their education ready to engage in roles partnered with primary care clinicians. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Report of the 2019-2020 AACP Academic Affairs Committee: Developing the Pharmacist Workforce for Society's Medication Use Needs in 2030.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe8203

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Arlington, Virginia.

The 2019-2020 Academic Affairs Committee was charged with identifying promising practices in academic-practice partnerships and professional pharmacy organization initiatives that are accelerating the transformation of a workforce prepared to assume responsibility for society's medication use needs in 2030 and determining the role AACP can plan in supporting these partnerships and initiatives. The committee identified a set of ideal principles, characteristics, and design elements of a high-quality, large-scale workforce development program. The committee also categorized current mechanisms for professional workforce development, in addition to identifying their strengths and weaknesses, with the realization that novel approaches are needed to accomplish the goal of large-scale workforce transformation. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Report of the 2019-2020 Strategic Engagement Standing Committee.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe8202

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Arlington, Virginia.

For the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) strategic engagement is critical to the success of colleges and schools of pharmacy in expanding pharmacy and public health practice, meeting programmatic needs, and fulfilling institutional missions. The 2019-2020 Strategic Engagement Committee was charged with exploring the collaborative relationships colleges and schools have within their state to advance pharmacy practice. More specifically, this committee was tasked to examine those relationships with current state pharmacy and medical associations. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

The Report of the 2019-2020 Professional Affairs Standing Committee: Pharmacist Integration with Primary Care Practices.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe8199

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Arlington, Virginia.

The 2019-2020 Professional Affairs Committee was charged to (1) Describe the leadership role of schools of pharmacy in advancing interprofessional practice, with an emphasis on physician-pharmacist collaborative relationships; (2) Establish an inventory of resources that can support school efforts to grow collaborative partnerships between pharmacists and physicians; (3) Determine gaps that exist in the resources required to support schools in efforts to facilitate expansion of interprofessional partnerships; and (4) Define strategies and draft an action plan for AACP's role in facilitating member school efforts to accelerate the development of interprofessional practices within their geography of influence. This report provides information on the committee's process to address the committee charges as well as background and resources pertaining to the charges, describes the rationale for and the results from the focus groups conducted at the 2020 AACP Interim Meeting, communicates the results of an initial inventory of models that integrate pharmacists with primary care practices, and provides an overview on issues to continue the work to integrate pharmacists with primary care practices. The committee offered several revisions to current association policy statements and provided a proposed policy statement and several recommendations to AACP pertaining to the committee charges. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Report of the 2019-2020 AACP Student Affairs Standing Committee.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe8198

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Arlington, Virginia.

The 2019-2020 Student Affairs Standing Committee addressed charges related to professional identity formation (PIF) in order to set direction and propose action steps consistent with Priority #3.4 of the AACP Strategic Plan, which states "Academic-practice partnerships and pharmacist-involved practice models that lead to the progress of Interprofessional Practice (IPP) are evident and promoted at all colleges and schools of pharmacy." To this end, the committee was charged to 1) outline key elements of PIF, 2) explore the relationship between formal curricular learning activities and co- or extra-curricular activities in supporting PIF, 3) determine the degree to which there is evidence that strong PIF is embedded in student pharmacists' educational experience, and 4) define strategies and draft an action plan for AACP's role in advancing efforts of schools to establish strong PIF in pharmacy graduates. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Leadership Lessons and Career Advice From the Musical .

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe8175

Washington State University, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Spokane, Washington.

The musical written by Lin-Manuel Miranda, creatively depicts the life and career of founding father Alexander Hamilton. While Hamilton is the primary focus, highlights of the career and personal journeys of other leaders, such as George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Aaron Burr, are interjected throughout the production. Often the musical numbers in focus on aspects of leadership and career development that Hamilton and his contemporaries were learning or needed to learn. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Gender and Minority Considerations in Pharmacy School Student Wellbeing.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe8143

University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Years of Rampant Expansion Have Imposed Darwinian Survival-of-the-Fittest Conditions on US Pharmacy Schools.

Authors:
Daniel L Brown

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe8136

South University School of Pharmacy, Columbia, South Carolina.

The number of applicants to US pharmacy schools has been declining since 2013, leading to a national enrollment crisis. Enrollment challenges threaten the viability of many pharmacy programs. Some schools are better equipped than others to confront the risk of having to downsize or close, creating survival-of-the-fittest conditions. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Promoting Creative Problem-Solving in Schools of Pharmacy With the Use of Design Thinking.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe8065

University of North Carolina, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Creativity and innovation are commonly discussed topics in the health professions and health professions education. However, initiating creative problem-solving without having a well-defined process in place can be a significant struggle. The process is gaining popularity in the health professions as a helpful strategy for individuals to address complex problems. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

A Scoping Review of Pharmacy Preceptor Training Programs.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe8039

James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia.

To review the literature pertaining to pharmacy preceptor training programs. Preceptor training is becoming increasingly important to maintain the quality of experiential training and professional development of pharmacy students, preregistration trainees, and residents. This review found limited documented examples of preceptor training programs and wide variation in both their design and delivery, which was attributed to the diversity of pharmacy practice workplaces and the different types of trainees. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Opioid-Related Education Provided by Continuing Education Divisions at US Pharmacy Schools.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe8001

The University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy, Austin, Texas.

To quantify the number and type of new opioid-related continuing pharmacy education (CPE) activities offered by continuing education divisions (CEDs) at US schools and colleges of pharmacy from 2015 through 2018, and to determine the number of pharmacists who completed opioid-related CPE activities. Data was derived from the database of CPE activities maintained by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), which is the sole accreditation agency for all providers of CPE, including pharmacy schools. Data were filtered to include only pharmacy school CPE providers. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

A Review of Development Initiatives for Pharmacy Student and Resident Preceptors.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe7991

Purdue University, College of Pharmacy, West Lafayette, Indiana.

To review the published literature describing and evaluating pharmacy student and resident preceptor development. Database searches yielded 32 published articles on pharmacy preceptor development: 22 for experiential preceptors, eight for resident preceptors, and two encompassing both experiential and resident preceptors. The identified articles covered a variety of preceptor development strategies, including live, web-based, and multifaceted approaches, which were disseminated via analytical studies, needs assessment surveys, and descriptive reports. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

An Investigation of Prevalence and Predictors of Disengagement and Exhaustion in Pharmacy Students.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe7945

University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, Lexington, Kentucky.

To determine the prevalence of burnout in first, second, and third professional year (P1, P2, and P3) pharmacy students at a single institution and identify predictors of higher burnout scores. A 31-question anonymous online survey was developed and administered to a total of 390 P1, P2, and P3 students at the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy. The survey consisted of a modified version of the 16-question Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI) and 14 additional questions related to demographic and co-curricular and extracurricular related questions. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Predictors of Student Failure or Poor Performance on Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe7890

St. Louis College of Pharmacy, St. Louis, MO.

To determine factors predictive of student failure or poor performance on advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) at a single pharmacy program. This retrospective cohort evaluated students entering the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program from 2012-2014 at St. Louis College of Pharmacy. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Update on Pharmacist Workforce Data and Thoughts on How to Manage the Oversupply.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe7889

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.

The annual number of Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) graduates is projected to exceed the number of annual pharmacist job openings over the next 10 years. Loss of retail sector jobs will be partially offset by projected gains in several other sectors; however, oversupply will persist until the number of graduates is more reflective of job market capacity. Large-scale practice transformation will not happen overnight; consequently, schools and colleges of pharmacy must immediately change their perspective from producing graduates to fill pharmacist roles, to producing graduates who are prepared with expertise and professional skills to excel in many types of well-paying positions. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Longitudinal Assessment of Pharmacy Students' Confidence and Skill in Providing Evidence-based Answers to Clinical Questions.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe7884

University of Wisconsin, Madison School of Pharmacy, Madison, Wisconsin.

To assess Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students' skills and confidence in using an evidence-based medicine (EBM) approach to answer practice-based, clinical questions. Pharmacy students' ability to provide evidence-based answers for real-world clinical questions was assessed at two time points in the PharmD curriculum using a standard tool and trained evaluators. Pharmacy students' confidence regarding their EBM skills was self-assessed at four points in the program, with the first survey administered before the EBM sequence and the final survey administered prior to graduation. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Evaluating Practice Readiness of Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Students Using the Core Entrustable Professional Activities.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe7853

Mercer University College of Pharmacy, Atlanta, Georgia.

To evaluate levels of entrustability and practice readiness in advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) students using a pilot instrument designed to assess their competency in performing the entrustable professional activities (EPAs) expected of new pharmacy graduates. A pilot instrument was developed directly from EPAs to measure entrustability levels on a scale of one to five. Five APPE preceptors from several different practice areas participated. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Integrating Health Literacy and Cultural Competency Concepts Across the Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe7764

Cedarville University, School of Pharmacy, Cedarville, Ohio.

To determine the longitudinal impact of integrating health literacy and cultural competency content throughout the professional pharmacy curriculum and the impact of additional changes made to the curriculum based on the results of a longitudinal analysis. Health literacy and cultural competency concepts were integrated throughout a four-year professional pharmacy curriculum. A cohort of students were assessed using health literacy and cultural competency survey instruments at baseline, the end of the fall semester of the first professional (P1) year, and the end of each subsequent academic year. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Evaluation of a Council Structure and Meeting Format for Pharmacy Student Government in the Co-Curriculum.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe7755

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

To evaluate student perceptions of a transformed pharmacy student government structure and meeting format. The structure and general assembly meeting format of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) Eshelman School of Pharmacy Student Senate (ie, student government) underwent a transformation from that of a forum to that of a council in an effort to address concerns regarding limited information exchange, minimal discussion, and unengaged meeting participants. To evaluate student perceptions of the new senate council format, members who attended at least one council meeting during the academic year were asked to complete a 12-item survey evaluating interorganizational relations, communication, collaboration, and efficiencies. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Characterization of Veterinary Pharmacy and Pharmacology Literature and its Availability to Pharmacy Education.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe7314

American College of Veterinary Pharmacists, Memphis, Tennessee.

To characterize the veterinary pharmacy and pharmacology literature cited by veterinary drug monographs and journal articles and describe the database indexing and availability of this literature in libraries serving pharmacy schools. Citations in American Academy of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics monographs, ( articles and () were analyzed for publication type and age. Three zones of cited journals were determined by Bradford's Law of Scattering based on citation counts. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Assessment of Pharmacy Student Perceptions Toward Common Stigmas Associated with Persons Living with HIV.

Authors:
Kenric B Ware

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 10;84(10):ajpe7270

South University School of Pharmacy, Columbia, South Carolina.

To analyze pharmacy students' views of societal stigmas often facing persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A 20-item survey conducted across a dual-campus school of pharmacy examined students' approval of societal aspects of the lives of persons living with HIV. Pharmacy students anonymously exchanged completed survey instruments to learn about peers' viewpoints. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Examining the Disconnect Between Communities of Practice Learning Theory and Educational Practices in the PharmD Program in Qatar.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 09;84(9):ajpe847515

University of Bath, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Bath, United Kingdom.

To examine the Qatar University Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program for evidence of incorporation of communities of practice (CoP) learning theory. A developed CoP framework was used as a theoretical instrument to analyze the evidence of CoP theory in QU PharmD program, utilizing a case study research approach. The research suggests that the evidence of the CoP framework in the PharmD program falls into three categories. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
September 2020

On Being Present With Learners and the Deeper Lessons From Acting.

Authors:
Daniel R Malcom

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 09;84(9):ajpe8062

Sullivan University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Louisville, Kentucky.

View Article and Full-Text PDF
September 2020

Positioning the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Squarely on the Center of the Desk.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 09;84(9):ajpe8046

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Pharmacy, Little Rock, Arkansas.

The scholarship of teaching and learning (SOTL) is one of four traditionally defined domains of research. Yet faculty members who pursue the SOTL may feel disadvantaged because of its relatively low perceived value by many institutions. Thus, interested faculty members may relegate the SOTL to a limited, secondary line of research and instead pursue other types of research that appear to be more highly valued by the institution. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
September 2020