5 results match your criteria American Journal Of Education[Journal]

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Reading and Math Achievement among Low-Income Urban Latino Youth: The Role of Immigration.

Am J Educ (Chic Ill) 2016 Feb 18;122(2):199-246. Epub 2015 Dec 18.

Using data from a household-based, stratified random sample of youth and their caregivers from low-income inner-city neighborhoods, this study examined the variability in the academic achievement of Latino youth. The results indicate a significant advantage in reading achievement for first- and second-generation immigrant youth, as compared to the third generation, which persisted even after controlling for important child, parenting, human capital, neighborhood, and demographic covariates. Follow-up analyses within the subsample of the first- and second-generation youth indicate that more recent arrival to the U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/684552DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5007539PMC
February 2016
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Social Capital, Information, and Socioeconomic Disparities in Math Coursework.

Am J Educ (Chic Ill) 2010 Nov;117(1):79-107

Department of Sociology and Population Research Center, University of Texas at Austin.

Analysis of the National Education Longitudinal Study revealed that socioeconomically advantaged students persist in high school math at higher rates than their disadvantaged peers, even when they have the same initial placements and skill levels. These disparities are larger among students with prior records of low academic status because students from more privileged backgrounds persist in math coursework even when their prior performance predicts they will not. Among students with low middle school math performance, those from socioeconomically disadvantaged families appear to benefit from having consultants for coursework decisions, so that they make up ground with their socioeconomically advantaged peers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/656347DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3130604PMC
November 2010

Following Different Pathways: Social Integration, Achievement, and the Transition to High School.

Authors:
Amy G Langenkamp

Am J Educ (Chic Ill) 2009 Nov;116(1):69-97

Georgia State University.

This study expands research on an academic and social turning point for adolescents, the transition to high school, by analyzing how students' level of social integration into school can affect high school academic performance. Using nationally representative data, three different pathways emerged as students transition to high school, characterized by varying amounts of disruption and opportunity for new social relationships upon entering high school. Findings suggest that elements of middle school social integration, including teacher bonding, popularity, and extracurricular participation, affect academic achievement when students enter high school. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/605101DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2906826PMC
November 2009

The Path through Math: Course Sequences and Academic Performance at the Intersection of Race-Ethnicity and Gender.

Am J Educ (Chic Ill) 2006 Nov;113(1):101-122

University of Texas at Austin.

Using new national data from Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement (AHAA), this article examines high school math patterns for students of different race-ethnicity and gender. Compared with white males, African American and Latino males receive lower returns from taking Algebra I during their freshman year, reaching lower levels of the math course sequence when they begin in the same position. This pattern is not explained by academic performance, and, furthermore, African American males receive less benefit from high math grades. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/506495DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2889488PMC
November 2006
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