23 results match your criteria American Journal Of Economics And Sociology[Journal]

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The general NFP hospital model.

Authors:
Mona Al-Amin

Am J Econ Sociol 2012 ;71(1):37-53

University of Florida, Health Science Center, Gainesville.

Throughout the past 30 years, there has been a lot of controversy surrounding the proliferation of new forms of health care delivery organizations that challenge and compete with general NFP community hospitals. Traditionally, the health care system in the United States has been dominated by general NFP (NFP) voluntary hospitals. With the number of for-profit general hospitals, physician-owned specialty hospitals, and ambulatory surgical centers increasing, a question arises: “Why is the general NFP community hospital the dominant model?” In order to address this question, this paper reexamines the history of the hospital industry. Read More

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April 2012
3 Reads

Pharmaceutical high profits: the value of R&D, or oligopolistic rents?

Am J Econ Sociol 2012 ;71(1):1-36

College of Saint Rose, and the CEO of Lakeview Mental Health Inc.

Pharmaceutical firms attribute high prices and high profits to costs associated with researching and developing the next generation of life-saving drugs. Using data from annual reports, this article tests the validity of this claim. We find that while pharmaceutical firms do invest in R&D, they also enjoy strong rents; between 1988 and 2009, pharmaceuticals enjoyed profits of 3 to 37 times the all-industry average, depending on the years, while investing proportionately less in R&D than other high-R&D firms. Read More

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Comparing pension systems in the circular flow of income.

Am J Econ Sociol 2011 ;70(5):1248-81

The Open University, UK.

The neoliberal consensus is that state funded pensions are not sustainable in the long term, due to declining fertility and longevity. In response, policymakers have pointed to the advantages of privately funded pension systems. This article compares the social provisioning of these two systems using the circular flow of income as an organizing framework. Read More

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April 2012
1 Read

TRAP abortion laws and partisan political party control of state government.

Am J Econ Sociol 2011 ;70(4):951-73

California State University, Long Beach.

Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers (or TRAP) laws impose medically unnecessary and burdensome regulations solely on abortion providers in order to make abortion services more expensive and difficult to obtain. Using event history analysis, this article examines the determinants of the enactment of a TRAP law by states over the period 1974–2008. The empirical results find that Republican institutional control of a state's legislative/executive branches is positively associated with a state enacting a TRAP law, while Democratic institutional control is negatively associated with a state enacting a TRAP law. Read More

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Land rent and housing policy: a case study of the San Francisco Bay area rental housing market.

Authors:
Stephen E Barton

Am J Econ Sociol 2011 ;70(4):845-73

Berkeley Rent Stabilization Board.

In the San Francisco Bay Area, where residential rent is among the highest in the United States, an analysis of data from several sources demonstrates that high rent cannot be accounted for by higher quality, higher operating costs, or higher construction costs. At least one-third of the total rent paid is land rent. Despite increases in real incomes, very-low-income tenants in the Bay Area today have less income remaining after payment of rent than tenants did in 1960. Read More

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Becoming a winner but staying the same: identities and consumption of lottery winners.

Authors:
Bengt Larsson

Am J Econ Sociol 2011 ;70(1):187-209

University of Gothenburg.

This article discusses how large lottery winnings are experienced and used by the winners. The study draws on a survey of 420 Swedish winners, which is analyzed against the background of previous research from the USA and Europe. The analyses show that winners are cautious about realizing any dreams of becoming someone else somewhere else. Read More

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Charitable giving expenditures and the faith factor.

Am J Econ Sociol 2011 ;70(1):152-86

Bradley University.

Using a permanent income hypothesis approach and an income-giving status interaction effect, a double hurdle model provides evidence of significant differences from the impact of household income and various household characteristics on both a household's likelihood of giving and its level of giving to religion, charity, education, others outside the household, and politics. An analysis of resulting income elasticity estimates revealed that households consider religious giving a necessity good at all levels of income, while other categories of giving are generally found to be luxury goods. Further, those who gave to religion were found to give more to education and charity then those not giving to religion, and higher education households were more likely to give to religion than households with less education. Read More

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The relevance of personal characteristics in health care rationing: what the Australian public thinks and why.

Am J Econ Sociol 2011 ;70(1):131-51

Centre for Health Economics, Monash University.

This article examines the preferences of the general public in Australia regarding health care resource allocation. While previous studies have revealed that the public is willing to give priority to particular groups of patients based on their personal characteristics, the present article goes beyond previous efforts in attempting to explain these results. In the present study, there was strong support among respondents for giving “equal priority” to people regardless of their personal characteristics. Read More

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March 2011
3 Reads

Do we still need cities? Evidence on rates of innovation from count data models of metropolitan statistical area patents.

Am J Econ Sociol 2011 ;70(1):86-108

Loyola University, Maryland.

Evidence of the importance of urban agglomeration and the offsetting effects of congestion are provided in a number of studies of productivity and wages. Little attention has been paid to this evidence in the economic growth literature, where the recent focus is on technological change. We extend the idea of agglomeration and congestion effects to the area of innovation by empirically looking for a nonlinear link between population density and patent activity. Read More

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The impact of housing rehabilitation on local neighborhoods: the case of small community development organizations.

Am J Econ Sociol 2011 ;70(1):50-85

Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

Across the nation, nonprofit organizations located in poor and declining neighborhoods are promoting homeownership in the hopes that their efforts will stave off decline and contribute to neighborhood stability. A common homeownership strategy among nonprofits is to acquire boarded-up or deteriorated homes at a low price, rehabilitate them, and then sell them at an affordable price. As these programs continue, nonprofit organizations want to show quantitatively that neighborhood revitalization works—that the funds devoted to an area stabilize neighborhoods or, even more, that they initiate a surge of continued upward progress. Read More

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The economics and ethics of Hurricane Katrina.

Am J Econ Sociol 2010 ;69(4):1294-1320

Ludwig von Mises Institute.

How might free enterprise have dealt with Hurricane Katrina and her aftermath. This article probes this question at increasing levels of radicalization, starting with the privatization of several government “services” and ending with the privatization of all of them. Read More

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December 2010
3 Reads

Sociology, economics, and gender: can knowledge of the past contribute to a better future?

Authors:
Julie A Nelson

Am J Econ Sociol 2010 ;69(4):1127-154

University of Massachusetts, Boston.

This article explores the profoundly gendered nature of the split between the disciplines of economics and sociology that took place in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, emphasizing implications for current efforts to bring the fields more closely together. Drawing on historical documents and feminist studies of science, it investigates the gendered processes underlying the divergence of the disciplines in definition, method, and degree of engagement with social problems. The recently developed field of economic sociology and other efforts to bridge the disciplinary gap have the potential to heal this disciplinary split, if they are broadened, deepened, and made wiser and more self-reflective through the use of feminist analysis. Read More

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December 2010
1 Read

Money, a substitute for confidence? Vaughan to Keynes and beyond.

Authors:
F Ritzmann

Am J Econ Sociol 1999 ;58(2):167-92

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Altruism and economic behavior: II--private charity and public policy.

Authors:
D A Kennett

Am J Econ Sociol 1980 Oct;39(4):337-53

The relative advantages of private charitable organizations as against government agencies in achieving efficient redistribution of income and supply of services are examined. Central to this discussion is the elasticity of private giving to tax concessions and the proportion of donor dollars being absorbed in overhead. Recent estimates of these magnitudes are summarized. Read More

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October 1980

A canonical quality of life model.

Authors:
J De Rooy

Am J Econ Sociol 1978 Oct;37(4):359-80

A five equation model was developed which related measurements of quality of life (QOL) to policy variables and to economic and social characteristics. The model was used to i) determine the jointness, or interdependency, of components of QOL, ii) demonstrate the usefulness of canonical correlation for measuring the marginal products of determinants of QOL, and iii) construct QOL indexes of social indicators. The model's parameters were estimated from state data for the U. Read More

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October 1978

Hospital cost inflation and physician payment.

Authors:
I Leveson E Rodgers

Am J Econ Sociol 1976 Apr;35(2):161-74

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The relation of 'human capital' preservation to health costs.

Authors:
J S Spratt

Am J Econ Sociol 1975 Jul;34(3):295-307

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The fortunes of economic reform legislation: the case of the Drug Amendments Act of 1962.

Authors:
H Steele

Am J Econ Sociol 1966 ;25(1):39-52

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