7 results match your criteria American Journal Of Criminal Justice[Journal]

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One Step at a Time: A Latent Transitional Analysis on Changes in Substance Use, Exposure to Violence, and HIV/AIDS Risk Behaviors among Female Offenders.

Am J Crim Justice 2018 Sep 10;43(3):471-485. Epub 2017 Nov 10.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

The aim of this analysis is to identify latent subgroups of women based on substance use, exposure to violence, and risky sexual behaviors and quantify discrete stages of behavior change over time. Data comes from 317 women recruited from a Municipal Drug Court System in the Midwest. All participants were interviewed regarding their substance use and sexual behaviors, as well as their exposure to violence at baseline, a 4th-month follow-up, and an 8th-month follow-up. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12103-017-9419-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6135105PMC
September 2018

Highly Rated and most Frequent Stressors among Police Officers: Gender Differences.

Am J Crim Justice 2016 Dec;41(4):645-662

Biostatistics and Epidemiology Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morgantown, WV, USA.

This descriptive study examined the top five most frequent and highly rated occupational stressors from the Spielberger Police Stress Survey among 365 police officers enrolled in the Buffalo Cardio-Metabolic Occupational Police Stress (BCOPS) Study (2004-2009). Prevalence, frequency, and rating of stressors were compared across gender. Poisson regression was used to estimate the prevalence and prevalence ratio (PR) of events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12103-016-9342-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5330309PMC
December 2016
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Prosecutors' Perspectives on Elder Justice Using an Elder Abuse Forensic Center.

Am J Crim Justice 2016 Dec 9;41(4):780-795. Epub 2016 Jan 9.

Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California, 3715 McClintock Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0191, USA.

Prosecution is a rare outcome in elder financial exploitation. Previous studies have shown that elder abuse forensic centers-multidisciplinary teams that help investigate and respond to elder mistreatment-increase prosecution rates by enhancing teamwork across agencies. Research is needed to identify what aspects of this intervention model lead to better elder justice outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12103-015-9321-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6186451PMC
December 2016

The Mediated Effect of Contextual Risk Factors on Trajectories of Violence: Results from a Nationally Representative, Longitudinal Sample of Hispanic Adolescents.

Am J Crim Justice 2011 Dec;36(4):327-343

College of Medicine, Department of Health Outcomes and Policy and Institute for Child Health Policy, University of Florida, 1329 SW 16th St. Room 5130, PO Box 100177, Gainesville, FL 32610-0177, USA.

The current study sought to estimate trajectories of violent behavior and evaluate the direct and indirect effects of contextual factors among Hispanics, stratified by gender. Relying on data from 3,719 Hispanic adolescents surveyed as a part of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), violence trajectories were estimated using group-based trajectory modeling. The results identified three groups of violence trajectories for both males and females (non-violent, desistors, and escalators) and there were considerable gender differences in the direct and indirect effects of risk and protective factors on violent behavior. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12103-011-9138-y
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12103-011-9138-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3782310PMC
December 2011
5 Reads

A Multi-Level Approach to Investigating Neighborhood Effects on Physical Aggression among Urban Chicago Youth.

Am J Crim Justice 2011 Dec;36(4):392-407

Department of Criminology, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Ave, Tampa, FL 33620, USA.

The current study evaluates neighborhood effects, individual-level effects, and demographic characteristics that influence physically aggressive behavior among urban youth. Using data derived from 5,812 adolescents from Project Northland Chicago (PNC) and Heirarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) techniques, the results suggested that neighborhood problems significantly predicted physical aggression, before and after adjustment for individual-level risk factors (alcohol use, peer alcohol use, lack of adult supervision, and depression) and demographics. After accounting for baseline physical aggression, however, neighborhood problems were no longer a significant predictor of physical aggression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12103-011-9118-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3774046PMC
December 2011
3 Reads

Trajectories of Physical Aggression Among Hispanic Urban Adolescents and Young Adults: An Application of Latent Trajectory Modeling from Ages 12 to 18.

Am J Crim Justice 2010 Apr;35(3):121-133

Department of Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, & Institute for Child Health Policy, University of Florida, PO Box 100177, Gainesville, FL 32615, USA.

This study sought to identify trajectories of physical aggression among urban Hispanic youth, and to examine the effects of risk and protective factors at age 11 on trajectories of physical aggression over time (ages 12-18). Relying on data from 731 urban Hispanic adolescents from Project Northland Chicago (PNC), latent trajectory modeling was used to determine the number of trajectories, and multinomial logistic regression was used to identify the predictors associated with trajectory membership. The results suggested five trajectories of physical aggression (non-aggressive, low stable, escalators, early-rapid desistors, and high aggression/moderate desistors). Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12103-010-9074-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12103-010-9074-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2995259PMC
April 2010
5 Reads

Sex Similarities/Differences in Trajectories of Delinquency among urban Chicago Youth: The Role of Delinquent Peers.

Am J Crim Justice 2010 Jun;35(1-2):56-75

University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA

A growing body of literature has recently emerged examining sex-specific pathways of offending. Yet, despite significant gains, this area of research is still rather underexplored. With a particular focus on the role of delinquent peers, this current study investigates the sex similarities/differences in offending trajectories among a large sample of urban Chicago male and female youth (n=3,038) from 6th through 8th grade (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12103-009-9066-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3148146PMC
June 2010
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