208 results match your criteria American Indian and Alaska native mental health research Online[Journal]


Through the Diamond Threshold: A Community-based Psycho-Educational Group Training Program for Treatment of Substance Use Disorders Among American Indians.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2019 ;26(1):79-105

Researchers offer Through the Diamond Threshold, a culturally relevant, community-based training program to increase awareness and promote healing related to substance use disorders (SUD) among American Indians (AIs). For providers, this program seeks to promote greater cultural responsiveness, empathy, cultural humility, and effectiveness in SUD treatment provision. Largely interactive in nature, the activities offer an opportunity for participants to immerse themselves in an AI experience through the use of stories, music, a traditional meal, and experiential exercises. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2601.2019.79DOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

Diné (Navajo) Healer Perspectives on Commercial Tobacco Use in Ceremonial Settings: An Oral Story Project to Promote Smoke-Free Life.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2019 ;26(1):63-78

Many American Indian (AI) healers are faced with a dilemma of how to maintain the ceremonial uses of traditional tobacco meant to encourage the restoration and balance of mind, body, and spirit, while discouraging commercial tobacco use and protecting against secondhand smoke exposure in ceremonial settings. To explore this dilemma and offer culturally informed solutions, researchers conducted qualitative interviews with Navajo healers who describe the history and role of commercial tobacco within ceremonial contexts. Healers understand the importance of their role on their community's health and expressed deep concern about the use of commercial tobacco in the ceremonial setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2601.2019.63DOI Listing
January 2019

Sources of Stress Among Midwest American Indian Adults with Type 2 Diabetes.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2019 ;26(1):33-62

Despite alarming health disparities among American Indians (AIs) and acknowledgement that stressors negatively influence health, conceptualization of the full spectrum of stressors that impact Indigenous communities is underdeveloped. To address this gap, we analyze focus group transcripts of AI adults with type 2 diabetes from five tribal communities and classify stressors using an inductive/deductive analytical approach. A Continuum of American Indian Stressor Model was constructed from categorization of nineteen stressor categories within four domains. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2601.2019.33DOI Listing
January 2019

Evaluation of a Native Youth Leadership Program Grounded in Cherokee Culture: The Remember the Removal Program.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2019 ;26(1):1-32

Indigenous youth suffer from high rates of comorbid mental and physical health disease. The purpose of this research was to evaluate an existing intervention aimed at empowering Indigenous youth, using a qualitative, community-based participatory research method. We completed focus groups with 23 program participants, and analysis revealed positive improvements in physical, emotional, social, and cultural domains. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2601.2019.1DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

In-hospital Mortality, Length of Stay, and Discharge Disposition in a Cohort of Rural and Urban American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(3):78-91

This study uses data from the 2012 National Inpatient Sample to determine if mortality, length of stay, and discharge disposition are different between rural and urban American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) with alcohol abuse, depression, diabetes, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Results show no difference in mortality between groups. Alcohol abuse, depression, and diabetes are less prevalent in rural AI/ANs, and rural patients have shorter lengths of stay and fewer chronic conditions, diagnoses, and procedures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2503.2018.78DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Feasibility of a Systems Approach to Treat Commercial Tobacco Dependence within American Indian Health Clinics.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(3):52-77

American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) have the highest smoking prevalence, smoking-related disease, and mortality rates of any racial or ethnic group. Three AI health clinics in Minnesota implemented an evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment intervention that included provider education and customized clinical system tools. A baseline assessment of each clinic facility guided the focus of the intervention and tailored the clinical system tools. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2503.2018.52DOI Listing
January 2018
1 Read

Conceptualizing School Belongingness in Native Youth: Factor Analysis of the Psychological Sense of School Membership Scale.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(3):26-51

The Psychological Sense of School Membership (PSSM) scale is widely used to measure school belongingness among adolescents. However, previous studies identify inconsistencies in factor structures across different populations. The factor structure of the PSSM has yet to be examined with American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth, a population of keen interest given reports of their educational and health disparities, and the potential of belongingness as a protective factor against risk behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2503.2018.26DOI Listing
January 2018

Exploring the Relationship between Sense of Coherence and Historical Trauma among American Indian Youth.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(3):1-25

Historical trauma has been associated with many health and social issues. However, there is little understanding of how American Indian (AI) youth cope with historical trauma. Sense of Coherence (SOC) provides a promising framework for studying the relationship between resiliency and historical trauma, as it is a theorized mechanism that helps individuals cope with ongoing stress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2503.2018.1DOI Listing
January 2018
7 Reads

From Ambivalence to Revitalization: Negotiating Cardiovascular Health Behaviors Related to Environmental and Historical Trauma in a Northwest American Indian Community.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(2):103-128

Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN). Utilizing narratives from members of a Pacific Northwest tribe, this paper explores perceptions about behaviors affecting cardiovascular health through tribal members' lived experiences related to place-based environmental historical trauma. Findings from narrative analysis indicate that ambivalence is an effect of historical trauma and complicates the adoption of protective cardiovascular health behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2502.2018.103DOI Listing
January 2018

Screening for Postpartum Depression in American Indian/Alaska Native Women: A Comparison of Two Instruments.

Authors:
Jennifer L Heck

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(2):74-102

This review examined validation studies of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) to identify an appropriate postpartum depression (PPD) screening tool for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women in the U.S. Databases were searched using: EPDS paired with psychometric properties or validation and PHQ-9 paired with PPD and psychometric properties or validation, yielding a final sample of 58 articles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2502.2018.74DOI Listing
January 2018

Physical Activity among Navajo Cancer Survivors: A Qualitative Study.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(2):54-73

Physical activity (PA) may improve quality of life and survival among cancer survivors; however, little is known about Navajo cancer survivor PA. We evaluated Navajo cancer survivor PA habits, barriers, and preferences through focus groups and interviews (n = 32). Transcripts were coded in NVivo and major themes summarized by consensus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2502.2018.54DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322393PMC
January 2018
16 Reads

Demographic, Social, and Mental Health Aspects of American Indian and Alaska Native Adolescents in Hawai'i.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(2):20-53

American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) constitute 2.2% of Hawai'i's population. Unfortunately, very little is known about the mental health of AI/AN youth in Hawai'i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2502.2018.20DOI Listing
January 2018
1 Read

Future Directions in Disseminating Research Findings to Urban Alaska Native People.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(1):96-109

Southcentral Foundation (SCF), a tribal health organization based in Anchorage, Alaska, operates and plans health care services in response to the priorities and tribal values of Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) people, including traditional concepts of wellness, reciprocity, and working in relationship. In an effort to better incorporate AN/AI priorities and values in research dissemination, the SCF Research Department hosted the Alaska Native Health Research Forum (Forum) in May 2016. In this paper, we describe the communication strategies used by the SCF Public Relations Department, which were shared with Forum attendees, describe attendee recommendations for researchers to consider and implement, and then discuss future directions for dissemination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2501.2018.96DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6369693PMC
January 2018
4 Reads

Community Dissemination in a Tribal Health Setting: A Pharmacogenetics Case Study.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(1):80-94

Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) people experience a disproportionate burden of health disparities in the United States. Including AN/AI people in pharmacogenetic research offers an avenue to address these health disparities, however the dissemination of pharmacogenetic research results in the community context can be a challenging task. In this paper, we describe a case-study that explores the preferences of AN/AI community members regarding pharmacogenetic research results dissemination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2501.2018.80DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6367726PMC
January 2018
7 Reads

Disseminating the Results of a Depression Management Study in an Urban Alaska Native Health Care System.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(1):62-79

Increased attention to diagnostic accuracy in depression screening and management within primary care has demonstrated inadequate care when patients prematurely discontinue recommended treatments such as medication and counseling. Decision-support tools can enhance the medical decision-making process. In 2010, the Southcentral Foundation (SCF) Research Department developed a stakeholder-driven decision support tool to aid in depression management. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5986557PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2501.2018.62DOI Listing
January 2018
6 Reads

Disseminating Information on Trauma Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment in a Tribal Health Setting: A Case Study.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(1):43-61

Exposure to trauma is consistently associated with co-occurrence of behavioral health disorders. Primary care settings are opportune places to screen for traumatic experiences and symptoms, as they are often the initial point of care for behavioral health concerns by the Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) population. In this case study, we examine results dissemination activities at the SCF Research Department-hosted 2016 Alaska Native Health Research Forum (Forum) of a pilot study of a trauma-focused screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (T-SBIRT) process for AN/AI adults in primary care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2501.2018.43DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6342266PMC
January 2018
8 Reads

Alaska Native Health Research Forum: Perspectives on disseminating research findings.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(1):30-41

In May 2016, Southcentral Foundation (SCF), a regional tribal health corporation based in Anchorage, Alaska convened a half-day health research forum for Alaska Native and American Indian community members to obtain feedback on communication of research findings. Thirty one individuals attended the Forum and 22 completed a pre and post survey. Respondents found the Forum to be a useful method to learn about research projects and their willingness to participate in health research reportedly increased because of the event. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2501.2018.30DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6342262PMC
January 2018
5 Reads

Approach and Methods of the 2016 Alaska Native Research Forum.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(1):19-29

Southcentral Foundation, a tribal health organization serving Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) people in southcentral Alaska, convened the Alaska Native Health Research Forum (Forum) for AN/AI people in May 2016. The purpose of the Forum was to obtain AN/AI community member feedback about sharing health research results. This article describes the funding mechanism that provided resources for the Forum and other factors that were considered when designing the Forum. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2501.2018.19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6392196PMC
January 2018
2 Reads

Challenges in Engaging and Disseminating Health Research Results Among Alaska Native and American Indian People in Southcentral Alaska.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(1):3-18

Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) people have negative research experiences, including lack of timely, respectful, and relevant communication about research findings. Southcentral Foundation (SCF), a tribally owned and operated health care organization in Alaska, has redesigned the health care system, enacted research policies, and established a research department which uses best practices of Community Engaged Research with AN/AI people. Department staff and community members, however, perceive significant limitations in the reach of and satisfaction with ongoing engagement and dissemination efforts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2501.2018.3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6342264PMC
January 2018
3 Reads

Introduction.

Authors:
Denise A Dillard

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2018 ;25(1):1-17

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2501.2018.1DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Integrated Care with Indigenous Populations: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2017 ;24(3):88-110

Introduction: The integration of behavioral health into medical care is related to positive results including improved patient health outcomes, provider satisfaction, and cost-offset. Indigenous people suffer from the highest health disparities in the nation and disproportionately experience barriers to health care; yet it is unknown if integrated care is effective for this population.

Methods: A systematic literature review was completed on the state of integrated care at Indigenous-serving health care sites in 2014 and was updated in 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2403.2017.88DOI Listing

Religious and Spiritual Practices Among Home-less Urban American Indians and Alaska Natives with Severe Alcohol Problems.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2017 ;24(3):39-62

Engagement in religious and spiritual practices may be protective for homeless individuals with alcohol-related problems. However, little is known in this regard for urban-dwelling American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) who have disproportionately high rates of homelessness and co-occurring alcohol use problems. Using secondary data from a nonrandomized controlled study testing a Housing First intervention, AI/AN participants (n = 52) and non-AI/AN participants (n = 82) were compared on demographic variables, alcohol use problems, religious affiliations, and religious/spiritual practices (importance, frequency, and type). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2403.2017.39DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6287631PMC
July 2018
1 Read

Comparison of American Indian and Non-Native BASC-2 Self-Report-Adolescent Scores.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2017 ;24(3):14-38

BASC-2 SRP-A scores of 162 American Indian (AI) youth were compared with those of an ethnically diverse sample (N = 200) to explore group equivalence. A MANOVA indicated group differences among the five composites. AIs outscored non-Natives in Inattention/Hyperactivity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2403.2017.14DOI Listing

Psychometric examination of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale with older American Indians: The Native Elder Care Study.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2017 ;24(3):1-17

Measuring mental health accurately is an important endeavor for screening purposes. Depression scales, such as the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale, have been well-established among different populations. Yet, little work has been done to examine the reliability and validity of the CES-D among older American Indians and Alaska Natives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2403.2017.1DOI Listing

Stressful Life Events and Self-Reported Postpartum Depressive Symptoms 13-24 Months After Live Birth Among Non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native Mothers in Oregon: Results from a Population-Based Survey.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2017 ;24(2):76-98

Objectives: We explored the association between stressful life events and postpartum depressive symptoms among non-Hispanic American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) mothers.

Methods: We analyzed self-reports of stressful life events and depressive symptoms from 298 AI/AN respondents and conducted logistic regression to examine their association.

Results: Of the AI/AN mothers who responded, 29. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2402.2017.76DOI Listing
May 2018
5 Reads

American Indian and White Adoptees: Are There Mental Health Differences?

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2017 ;24(2):54-75

Adult adoptees are at increased risk for mental health problems compared to nonadoptees. However, little is known about subsets of adoptees that may be more or less vulnerable to mental health problems. The purpose of this study was to explore the presence of mental health problems of American Indian (AI) persons compared to White persons who were separated from their birth families during childhood by foster care and/or adoption. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2402.2017.54DOI Listing
May 2018
4 Reads

Obesogenic Behaviors, Self-Efficacy, and Depressive Symptoms in American Indian Children.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2017 ;24(2):18-39

Background: American Indian (AI) children suffer from high rates of obesity, obesity-related disease, obesogenic behaviors, and depressive symptoms.

Objective: Study was designed to determine the associations between depressive symptoms and obesogenic behaviors in school-aged AI children in Oklahoma.

Methods: Study design was cross-sectional. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2402.2017.18DOI Listing

A Comparison of Early Adolescent Behavioral Health Risks Among Urban American Indians/Alaska Natives and their Peers.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2017 ;24(2):1-17

We sought to examine behavioral health indicators for an early adolescent population of American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) within an urban setting in Washington State. We conducted secondary data analyses from a randomized clinical trial implemented in local middle schools that compared AI/ANs (n = 43), non-Hispanic Whites (n = 620), and other racial/ethnic minority youth (n = 527) across a variety of behavioral health risks. AI/AN youth reported significantly more depressive symptoms than other racial/ethnic minorities as well as non-Hispanic Whites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2402.2017.1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6282166PMC
May 2018
11 Reads

Changes in Physical Activity Barriers among American Indian Elders: A Pilot Study​.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2017 ;24(1):127-140

The objective of the present study was to assess whether selfreported physical activity barriers could be reduced among American Indian elders who participated in a 6-week randomized physical activity trial that compared the use of a pedometer only to that of pedometers with step-count goal setting. Elders (N = 32) were compared on the Barriers to Being Physically Active Quiz after participating in a pilot physical activity trial. Elders were classified into high- and low-barrier groups at baseline and compared on self-reported physical activity, health-related quality of life, pedometer step counts, and 6-minute walk performance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2305.2016.127DOI Listing
March 2018
4 Reads

Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for Urban American Indians and Alaska Natives, Part II: Costs.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2017 ;24(1):107-126

The present study examined costs of two residential substance abuse treatment programs designed for urban American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Costs for one agency were well within national norms, while costs at the other program were less than expected from nationwide data. Economies of scale accounted for much of the difference between observed and expected costs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2401.2017.107DOI Listing
March 2018
5 Reads

Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for Urban American Indians and Alaska Natives, Part I: Services and Staff.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2017 ;24(1):61-106

Although residential substance abuse treatment is utilized extensively by urban American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs), there are few detailed descriptions of this care. This study delineated services provided by and interviewed staff working at residential programs designed for chemically dependent urban AI/ANs. Study agencies were compared to national data from residential programs serving general population clients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2401.2017.61DOI Listing
March 2018
6 Reads

Healing the Spirit: Exploring Sexualized Trauma and Recovery among Indigenous Men in Toronto.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2017 ;24(1):30-60

Colonial policies in Canada have led to social disruption and intergenerational trauma across Indigenous nations, contributing to high rates of sexualized violence within many communities. While mental health and social science discourse has identified the harmful impacts of violence against Indigenous women in Canada, there continues to be a lack of focus on the unique mental health needs of Indigenous men in this regard. This article reviews the results of a nationally funded research study which looked at the mental health and healing needs of Indigenous men in Toronto who have experienced sexualized trauma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2401.2017.30DOI Listing
March 2018
49 Reads

Academic Achievement of American Indian and Alaska Native Students: Does Social Emotional Competence Reduce the Impact of Poverty.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2017 ;24(1):1-29

Social-emotional competence may be a protective factor for academic achievement among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) students. This study used Fisher's r to Z transformations to test for group differences in the magnitude of relationships between social-emotional competence and achievement. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to determine the variance in academic achievement explained by student race, poverty, and social-emotional competence, and the schoolwide percentage of students by race. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2401.2017.1DOI Listing
March 2018
3 Reads

Native Generations: A campaign addressing infant mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2016 ;23(5):59-77

This study describes the development and evaluation of Native Generations, a campaign addressing high rates of infant mortality (IM) among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) in urban areas. Campaign development included reviews of literature and previous campaigns, an advisory council, and focus groups. Campaign messages are strength-based, encouraging AI/AN caregivers to utilize available Native-specific resources, including health care, support services, and programming as IM protective factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2305.2016.59DOI Listing
September 2017
6 Reads

Identifying and understanding Indigenous ways of evaluating physical activity programs.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2016 ;23(5):34-58

Indigenous evaluation frameworks have not been investigated in the context of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) physical activity programs, an important area given the relationship between effective physical activity programs and quality of life among these populations. To address this gap, staff members of AI/AN physical activity programs were interviewed to explore their understanding of and experiences with evaluation. Findings suggest that Indigenous evaluation is perceived as narrative and holistic, Indigenous knowledge is used in program decision making, though it is not always acknowledged as evaluation, and there is not a universally desired way to evaluate AI/AN physical activity programs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2305.2016.34DOI Listing
September 2017

An urban American Indian health clinic's response to a community needs assessment.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2016 ;23(5):15-33

Utilizing community-based methods, we assessed the behavioral and physical health needs of a Detroit metropolitan Indian health clinic. The project goal was to identify health service needs for urban American Indians/Alaska Natives and develop the infrastructure for culturally competent and integrative behavioral and physical health care. We conducted 38 semi-structured interviews and 12 focus groups with service providers and community members. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2305.2016.15DOI Listing
September 2017
2 Reads

Community belonging and sedentary behavior among First Nations adults in Canada: The moderating role of income.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2016 ;23(5):1-14

This study examined how income and community belonging may interact to influence leisure sedentary behavior among Indigenous adults. Data were obtained from 1,304 First Nations adults who completed the Canadian Community Health Survey in 2012. Among average-income earners, a strong sense of belonging to local community was associated with less sedentary behavior, a finding also documented in the general population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2305.2016.1DOI Listing
September 2017
19 Reads

Shaping a Stories of Resilience Model from urban American Indian elders' narratives of historical trauma and resilience.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2016 ;23(4):63-85

American Indians (AIs) have experienced traumatizing events but practice remarkable resilience to large-scale and long-term adversities. Qualitative, community-based participatory research served to collect urban AI elders' life narratives on historical trauma and resilience strategies. A consensus group of 15 elders helped finalize open-ended questions that guided 13 elders in telling their stories. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6014738PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2304.2016.63DOI Listing
September 2017
14 Reads

Epidemiology of substance-exposed pregnancies at one Great Lakes hospital that serves a large number of American Indians.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2016 ;23(4):44-62

Objective: The purpose of this research was to determine the prevalence of substance-exposed pregnancies at a hospital in the Great Lakes region of the U.S.

Method: Data were collected via retrospective chart abstractions of patients who were seen for delivery at one Great Lakes region hospital during a 1-year period who were given at least one of the International Classification of Diseases codes related to substance use. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5011980PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2304.2016.44DOI Listing
September 2017

Identifying sexual health protective factors among Northern Plains American Indian youth: An ecological approach utilizing multiple perspectives.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2016 ;23(4):16-43

This study examined aspects of the sociocultural context in which American Indian (AI) teen pregnancy occurs, focusing specifically on protective factors for Northern Plains AI youth. Principles of community-based participatory research guided the qualitative data collection from 185 community members (focus groups with AI youth, youth parents, and elders; interviews with health care providers and school personnel) from a reservation and an urban community. Results indicated three protective systems impacted the sexual health and behaviors of AI youth: school, family, and enculturation. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5463740PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2304.2016.16DOI Listing
September 2017
2 Reads

Introduction.

Authors:
Jami Bartgis

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2016 ;23(3):i-v

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2303.2016.iDOI Listing
January 2018

Culturally sensitive assessments as a strength-based approach to wellness in Native communities: A community-based participatory research project.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2016 ;23(3):271-92

American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) have a unique, traumatic, and alienating history of education in the U.S., which may be directly related to overall health and well-being. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2303.2016.271DOI Listing
October 2017
42 Reads

Perceptions and use of community- and school-based behavioral health services among urban American Indian/Alaska Native youth and families.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2016 ;23(3):221-47

Understanding youths' awareness and use of behavioral health services is important for improving services and engagement. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with students, parents, and teachers/staff in an urban area to understand awareness and use of a school's Native-tailored and -staffed school-based behavioral health center (NT-BHC) and community-based services. Results showed overwhelmingly positive responses regarding NT-BHC staff and services, with concerns focused on too few staff and services, and on privacy and confidentiality, as well as important differences in awareness and use of behavioral health services among youth, parents, and teachers/staff, valuable for improving engagement with and services for AI/AN youth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2303.2016.221DOI Listing
October 2017

Strength-based well-being indicators for Indigenous children and families: A literature review of Indigenous communities' identified well-being indicators.

Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res 2016 ;23(3):206-20

Mainstream child and family well-being indicators frequently are based on measuring health, economic, and social deficits, and do not reflect Indigenous holistic and strength-based definitions of health and well-being. The present article is a review of literature that features Indigenous communities' self-identified strength-based indicators of child and family well-being. The literature search included Indigenous communities from across the world, incorporating findings from American Indians and Alaska Natives, First Nations, Native Hawaiians, Māori, Aboriginal Australians, and Sámi communities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5820/aian.2303.2016.206DOI Listing
October 2017