6 results match your criteria American Ethnologist[Journal]

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Urban mosquitoes, situational publics, and the pursuit of interspecies separation in Dar es Salaam.

Am Ethnol 2014 May;41(2):368-383

Institute for Science, Innovation and Society, School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, University of Oxford, 64 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PN, United Kingdom,

Recent work in anthropology points to the recognition of multispecies entanglements as the grounds for a more ethical politics. In this article, we examine efforts to control mosquitoes in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, as an example of the laborious tasks of disentanglement that characterize public health interventions. The mosquito surveillance and larval elimination practices of an urban malaria control program offer an opportunity to observe how efforts to create distance between species relate to the physical and civic textures of the city. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/amet.12081DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4241716PMC
May 2014
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Senses of care: Embodying inequality and sustaining personhood in the home care of older adults in Chicago.

Authors:
Elana D Buch

Am Ethnol 2013 Nov;40(4):637-650

Department of Anthropology, University of Iowa, 114 Macbride Hall, Iowa City, IA 52242-1332.

In paid home care-one of the fastest-growing occupations in the United States-low-wage workers help elderly clients living in their own homes remain independent by embodying and then reproducing the elders' lifetimes of experience. Exploring the bodily and moral consequences of everyday home care practices in Chicago, I show that in this context, sustaining independent personhood depended on and intensified unequal social relations. To sustain clients' personhood, workers developed a deeply embodied empathy that enabled them to imagine and re-create the elders' social and sensory worlds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/amet.12044DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4577066PMC
November 2013

Chronic disaster syndrome: Displacement, disaster capitalism, and the eviction of the poor from New Orleans.

Am Ethnol 2009 Nov;36(4):615-636

University of California, San Francisco.

Many New Orleans residents who were displaced in 2005 by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the subsequent levee failures and floods are still displaced. Living with long-term stress related to loss of family, community, jobs, and social security as well as the continuous struggle for a decent life in unsettled life circumstances, they manifest what we are calling "chronic disaster syndrome." The term refers not only to the physiological and psychological effects generated at the individual level by ongoing social disruption but also to the nexus of socioeconomic and political conditions that produce this situation as a long-term and intractable problem. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1548-1425.2009.01199.x
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1548-1425.2009.01199.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2818205PMC
November 2009
21 Reads

"Stains" on their self-discipline: Public health, hygiene, and the disciplining of undocumented immigrant parents in the nation's internal borderlands.

Am Ethnol 2009 Nov;36(4):784-798

Department of Anthropology, Campus Box 103, University of Colorado Denver, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364.

Histories of the role of public health in nation building have revealed the centrality of hygiene to eugenic mechanisms of racial exclusion in the turn-of-the-20th-century United States, yet little scholarship has examined its role in the present day. Through ethnography in a Mexican migrant farmworking community in California's Central Valley, we explore the role of oral-hygiene campaigns in racializing Mexican immigrant parents and shaping the substance of their citizenship. Public health officials perceive migrant farmworkers' children's oral disease as a "stain of backwardness," amplifying Mexican immigrants' status as "aliens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1548-1425.2009.01210.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2787473PMC
November 2009

Aged bodies and kinship matters: The ethical field of kidney transplant.

Am Ethnol 2006 Feb;33(1):81-99

Department of Anthropology, History and Social Medicine, Institute for Health and Aging, Box 0646, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143-0646,

The number of kidneys transplanted to people over age 70, both from living and cadaver donors, has increased steadily in the past two decades in the United States. Live kidney donation, on the rise for all age groups, opens up new dimensions of intergenerational relationship and medical responsibility when the transfer of organs is from younger to older people. There is little public knowledge or discussion of this phenomenon, in which the site of ethical judgment and activism about longevity and mortality is one's regard for the body of another and the substance of the body itself is ground for moral consideration about how kinship is "done. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1525/ae.2006.33.1.81
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/ae.2006.33.1.81DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2373268PMC
February 2006
8 Reads

[Not Available].

Authors:
L Paul B D Paul

Am Ethnol 1975 ;3:707-26

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September 1977
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