22 results match your criteria American Antiquity[Journal]

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Critique of the claim of cannibalism at Cowboy Wash.

Am Antiq 2000 ;65(1):179-90

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September 2007
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Conquistadors, excavators, or rodents: what damaged the King Site skeletons?

Authors:
G R Milner

Am Antiq 2000 ;65(2):355-63

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September 2007

Chronometers and units in early archaeology and paleontology.

Am Antiq 2000 ;65(4):691-707

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March 2007
44 Reads

Early Paleoindian women, children, mobility, and fertility.

Authors:
T A Surovell

Am Antiq 2000 ;65(3):493-508

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November 2006

Sandal types and Archaic prehistory on the Colorado Plateau.

Authors:
P R Geib

Am Antiq 2000 ;65(3):509-24

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November 2006

Pots, parties, and politics: communal feasting in the American Southwest.

Authors:
J M Potter

Am Antiq 2000 ;65(3):471-92

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November 2006
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Grief and burial in the American Southwest: the role of evolutionary theory in the interpretation of mortuary remains.

Authors:
D H MacDonald

Am Antiq 2001 Oct;66(4):704-14

GAI Consultants, Inc., Monroeville, PA.

Evolutionary theory, in consort with Marxism and processualism, provides new insights into the interpretation of grave-good variation. Processual interpretations of burial sites in the American Southwest cite age, sex, or social rank as the main determinants of burial-good variation. Marxist theorists suggest that mortuary ritual mediates social tension between an egalitarian mindset and an existing social inequality. Read More

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October 2001

Paleocoastal marine fishing on the Pacific Coast of the Americas: perspectives from Daisy Cave, California.

Am Antiq 2001 Oct;66(4):595-613

Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR.

Analysis of over 27,000 fish bones from strata at Daisy Cave dated between about 11,500 and 8500 cal B.P. suggests that early Channel Islanders fished relatively intensively in a variety of habitats using a number of distinct technologies, including boats and the earliest evidence for hook-and-line fishing on the Pacific Coast of the Americas. Read More

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October 2001

Archaeological politics and public interest in paleoamerican studies: lessons from Gordon Creek Woman and Kennewick Man.

Am Antiq 2001 Oct;66(4):565-75

Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.

This paper discusses the Kennewick lawsuit as it relates to the intended purposes of NAGPRA. It also reflects upon comments made by Swedlund and Anderson (1999) in a recent American Antiquity Forum, which conceptually linked two ancient skeletons, Gordon Creek Woman and Kennewick Man. Their assertions indicate the need for clarifying specific issues and events pertaining to the case. Read More

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October 2001
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Paleoindian interaction and mating networks: reply to Moore and Moseley.

Am Antiq 2001 Jul;66(3):530-5

Southeast Archeological Center, National Park Service, Tallahassee, FL.

How early human populations in North America maintained reproductive viability is a question that has shaped our research for over a decade. The concept of staging areas, mechanisms for band-macroband interaction, and an examination of how interaction networks could have formed and evolved over the course of the Paleoindian era are all solutions that we have presented. Read More

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How many frogs does it take to leap around the Americas? Comments on Anderson and Gillam.

Am Antiq 2001 Jul;66(3):526-9

Department of Anthropology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

In modeling the colonization of the Americas, Anderson and Gillam (2000) employ size estimates for vanguard forager bands that are of dubious reproductive viability in light of human incest prohibitions and variable sex ratios at birth. Read More

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Estimating the minimum number of skeletal elements (MNE) in zooarchaeology: a review and a new image-analysis GIS approach.

Am Antiq 2001 Apr;66(2):333-48

Department of Anthropology, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY.

Most zooarchaeologists employ some type of derived measure of skeletal element abundance in their analyses of faunal data. The minimum number of individuals (MNI) and the minimum number of animal units (MAU) are two of the most popular derived measurements, and each is based on a prior estimate of the minimum number of elements (MNE). Thus, the estimate of MNE from fragmented faunal fragments is the essential foundation for all inferences emanating from MNI and MAU estimates of skeletal element abundance. Read More

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A zooarchaeological signature for meat storage: re-thinking the drying utility index.

Authors:
T M Friesen

Am Antiq 2001 Apr;66(2):315-31

Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Although the practice of food storage is important to many questions addressed by archaeologists, demonstrating its presence in archaeological contexts can be difficult or impossible. One potentially useful approach to meat storage is the concept of the Drying Utility Index, introduced by Lewis Binford (1978) to predict which carcass portions, with attached bone, will be selected for storage by drying. However, this index has not been widely used by zooarchaeologists, at least in part because the calculations involved in its derivation are extremely complex. Read More

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An integrative approach to mortuary analysis: social and symbolic dimensions of Chumash burial practices.

Am Antiq 2001 Apr;66(2):185-212

Department of Anthropology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.

Although most archaeologists recognize that valuable information about the social lives of ancient people can be obtained through the study of burial practices, it is clear that the symbolic nature of burial rituals makes interpreting their social significance a hazardous enterprise. These analytical difficulties can be greatly reduced using a research strategy that draws upon the strengths of a broad range of conceptually and methodologically independent data sources. We illustrate this approach by using archaeological data from cemeteries at Malibu, California, to explore an issue over which researchers are sharply divided: when did the simple chiefdoms of the Chumash Indians first appear in the Santa Barbara Channel area? First we establish the social correlates of Chumash burial practices through the comparison of historic-period cemetery data, ethnohistoric records, and ethnographic accounts. Read More

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April 2001
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One person's food: how and why fish avoidance may affect the settlement and subsistence patterns of hunter-gatherers.

Am Antiq 2001 Jan;66(1):141-61

Department of Native Studies, Brandon University, Brandon, MB, Canada.

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January 2001

John Rowzée Peyton and the myth of the mound builders.

Authors:
D J Blakeslee

Am Antiq 1987 ;52(4):784-92

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Lead in the bones of prehistoric lead-glaze potters.

Authors:
S Jarcho

Am Antiq 1964 ;30(1):94-6

In 1932 Haury described lead-glaze pottery from the Southwest. In view of his report, it appeared desirable to find out whether the makers of such pottery suffered from lead poisoning. A series of 46 bone specimens from Kinishba, where lead-glaze pottery was made, and a control series of 33 specimens from Point of Pines, where such pottery is not known to have been made, were screened by X-ray and by X-ray diffraction. Read More

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October 2009
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