124 results match your criteria American Anthropologist[Journal]


A Qualitative Analysis of How Anthropologists Interpret the Race Construct.

Am Anthropol 2017 Sep 14;119(3):422-434. Epub 2017 Aug 14.

Departments of African and African American Studies, Biology and Community and Family Medicine and Center on Genomics, Race, Identity, Difference Duke University, Durham, NC 27708;

This article assesses anthropological thinking about the race concept and its applications. Drawn from a broader national survey of geneticists' and anthropologists' views on race, in this analysis, we provide a qualitative account of anthropologists' perspectives. We delve deeper than simply asserting that "race is a social construct. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aman.12890DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6075721PMC
September 2017
2 Reads

Acculturation and health: the moderating role of socio-cultural context.

Am Anthropol 2017 Sep 14;119(3):405-421. Epub 2017 Aug 14.

Department of Psychiatry & Human Behavior, Health and Disease Research Program, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.

Acculturation represents an important construct for elucidating the determinants and consequences of health disparities in minority populations. However, the processes and mechanisms underlying acculturation's effects on health are largely undetermined and warrant further study. We integrate concepts from anthropology and statistics to describe the role of sociocultural context as a putative modifier of the relationship between acculturation and health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aman.12867DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5617140PMC
September 2017
2 Reads

ENGAGING NATIVE AMERICANS IN GENOMICS RESEARCH.

Am Anthropol 2015 Dec 4;117(4):743-744. Epub 2015 Dec 4.

Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801;

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aman.12369DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5085287PMC
December 2015
1 Read

Local in Practice: Professional Distinctions in Angolan Development Work.

Am Anthropol 2016 09 19;118(3):495-507. Epub 2016 Jul 19.

Public Administration and International Affairs, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244.

Development workers employed by international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are commonly classified as national (local) or international (expatriate) staff members. The distinction is presumed to reflect the varieties of expertise required for the work and the workers' different biographies. I examine the experiences of Angolans working in an international democratization program to demonstrate how some professionals at the lowest tiers of international development NGOs engage in social practices that strategically emphasize or conceal certain skills, kinds of knowledge, or family circumstances to fulfill industry expectations of "local staff. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aman.12597DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5804746PMC
September 2016

When Did the Swahili Become Maritime?

Am Anthropol 2015 Mar;117(1):100-115

Department of Archaeology, University of York York, YO1 7EP, United Kingdom.

In this article, we examine an assumption about the historic Swahili of the eastern African coast: that they were a maritime society from their beginnings in the first millennium C.E. Based on historical and archaeological data, we suggest that, despite their proximity to and use of the sea, the level of maritimity of Swahili society increased greatly over time and was only fully realized in the early second millennium C. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aman.12171DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4368416PMC
March 2015
2 Reads

A biocultural approach to breastfeeding interactions in Central Africa.

Am Anthropol 2012 ;114(1):123-36

University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Anthropologists have long recognized that breastfeeding involves much more than feeding; it entails intimate social interactions between infants or children and their mothers. However, breastfeeding has predominantly been studied with respect to structural features (frequency, timing) as well as nutritional and health aspects of infant feeding. Thus, in this study we complement previous anthropological studies by examining social interactions that occur during breastfeeding among the Aka and Bofi foragers and Ngandu and Bofi farmers at various ages (three to four months, nine to ten months, toddlers). Read More

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October 2012
15 Reads

Moral maps and medical imaginaries: clinical tourism at Malawi's College of Medicine.

Am Anthropol 2012 ;114(1):108-22

University of Wisconsin-Madison.

At an understaffed and underresourced urban African training hospital, Malawian medical students learn to be doctors while foreign medical students, visiting Malawi as clinical tourists on short-term electives, learn about “global health.” Scientific ideas circulate fast there; clinical tourists circulate readily from outside to Malawi but not the reverse; medical technologies circulate slowly, erratically, and sometimes not at all. Medicine's uneven globalization is on full display. Read More

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October 2012
6 Reads

When "humanitarianism" becomes "development": the politics of international aid in Syria's Palestinian refugee camps.

Authors:
Nell Gabiam

Am Anthropol 2012 ;114(1):95-107

Iowa State University, Ames.

In recent years, the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) has attempted to go beyond its role as a provider of relief and basic services in Palestinian refugee camps and emphasize its role as a development agency. In this article, I focus on the Neirab Rehabilitation Project, an UNRWA-sponsored development project taking place in the Palestinian refugee camps of Ein el Tal and Neirab in northern Syria. I argue that UNRWA's role as a relief-centered humanitarian organization highlights the everyday suffering of Palestinian refugees, suffering that has become embedded in refugees’ political claims. Read More

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October 2012
6 Reads

Principle or pathology? Adjudicating the right to conscience in the Israeli military.

Authors:
Erica Weiss

Am Anthropol 2012 ;114(1):81-94

Princeton University.

The Israeli military's Conscience Committee evaluates and exempts pacifists from obligatory military service, based explicitly on concern for liberal tolerance. However, I found that liberal pacifist applicants’ principled objections to violence challenged the state, and as such, applicants who articulated their refusal in such terms are rejected by the military review board. By contrast, pacifist conscientious objection based in embodied visceral revulsion to violence did not challenge the state and moral order, and such cases were granted exemption. Read More

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October 2012
2 Reads

Architecture as animate landscape: circular shrines in the ancient Maya lowlands.

Am Anthropol 2012 ;114(1):64-80

University of New Hampshire, Durham.

In this study, I develop a theory of landscape archaeology that incorporates the concept of “animism” as a cognitive approach. Current trends in anthropology are placing greater emphasis on indigenous perspectives, and in recent decades animism has seen a resurgence in anthropological theory. As a means of relating in (not to) one's world, animism is a mode of thought that has direct bearing on landscape archaeology. Read More

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October 2012
1 Read

Cattle cults of the Arabian Neolithic and early territorial societies.

Am Anthropol 2012 ;114(1):45-63

The Ohio State University, Columbus.

At the cusp of food production, Near Eastern societies adopted new territorial practices, including archaeologically visible sedentism and nonsedentary social defenses more challenging to identify archaeologically. New archaeological and paleoenvironmental evidence for Arabia's earliest-known sacrifices points to territorial maintenance in arid highland southern Yemen. Here sedentism was not an option prior to agriculture. Read More

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October 2012
3 Reads

Rituals of creativity: tradition, modernity, and the "acoustic unconscious" in a U.S. collegiate jazz music program.

Authors:
Eitan Wilf

Am Anthropol 2012 ;114(1):32-44

The Hebrew University, Jerusalem.

In this article, I seek to complicate the distinction between imitation and creativity, which has played a dominant role in the modern imaginary and anthropological theory. I focus on a U.S. Read More

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October 2012

Instant noodles as an antifriction device: making the BOP with PPP in PNG.

Am Anthropol 2012 ;114(1):19-31

Trinity College, Hartford, CT.

Focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on urban and periurban Papua New Guinea (PNG), we discuss the significance of instant ramen noodles to those now known as the “bottom of the pyramid” (BOP). Although instant noodles are remarkable in that they are eaten by virtually everyone in the world, albeit in different amounts and for different reasons, they are marketed in PNG specifically as a “popularly positioned product” (PPP) for the BOP. Cheap, convenient, tasty, filling, and shelf stable, they are a modern addition to Sidney Mintz's classic “proletarian hunger killers” of sugar, tea, and coffee. Read More

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October 2012

Ethnographic empathy and the social context of rights: “rescuing” Maasai girls from early marriage.

Am Anthropol 2011 ;113(4):632-43

University College, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Esther is one of many young Maasai girls in Kenya "rescued" from early marriage. Her story is conventionally portrayed (trans)nationally and locally as a struggle between conservative pastoral patriarchs and the individual right of young girls to an education. I offer an ethnographic contextualization of the underlying factors giving rise to practices of early marriage, among the Maasai in Enkop, highlighting the contemporary predicaments of pastoralism in the face of population growth, climactic instability, and land-tenure reform and the insecurities and challenges around formal education. Read More

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October 2012

Scents of place: the dysplacement of a First Nations community in Canada.

Am Anthropol 2011 ;113(4):606-18

Earlham College, Richmond, IN.

Here I explore how the experience of place at a First Nations reserve in Ontario, located in the middle of Canada's "Chemical Valley," is disrupted by the extraordinary levels of pollution found there. In so doing, I give special attention to air pollution and residents' responses to associated odors - that is, to the sense of smell. Focusing on a unique feature of smell - that it operates primarily through indexicality - I draw on C. Read More

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October 2012
1 Read

Forced disappearance in an era of globalization: biopolitics, shadow networks, and imagined worlds.

Authors:
Ralph Rozema

Am Anthropol 2011 ;113(4):582-93

Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

In this article, I argue that the practice of forced disappearance of persons on the part of paramilitary groups has become linked to specific processes of globalization. Global flows related to biopolitics, global crime networks, and dehumanizing imaginations reproduced by mass media together constitute a driving force behind forced disappearances. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in the Colombian city of Medellín, I analyze how these global flows interact with local armed actors, helping create a climate conducive to forced disappearance. Read More

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October 2012

Dunbar's number: group size and brain physiology in humans reexamined.

Am Anthropol 2011 ;113(4):557-68

Durham University, UK.

Popular academic ideas linking physiological adaptations to social behaviors are spreading disconcertingly into wider societal contexts. In this article, we note our skepticism with one particularly popular—in our view, problematic—supposed causal correlation between neocortex size and social group size. The resulting Dunbar's Number, as it has come to be called, has been statistically tested against observed group size in different primate species. Read More

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October 2012
5 Reads

Who has time for Ćejf? Postsocialist migration and slow coffee in neoliberal Chicago.

Authors:
Ana Croegaert

Am Anthropol 2011 ;113(3):463-77

Loyola University, Chicago.

The official end to communism in Eastern Europe marked the onset of major migratory movements. Perhaps the most abrupt of these population shifts was the displacement of more than two million people in Yugoslavia's violent dissolution. Much of the existing literature on refugee migration has focused on victimization and citizenship claims. Read More

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October 2012

Claiming space for an engaged anthropology: spatial inequality and social exclusion.

Authors:
Setha M Low

Am Anthropol 2011 ;113(3):389-407

The Graduate Center of CUNY, New York, NY.

I use the concept of “engaged anthropology” to frame a discussion of how “spatializing culture” uncovers systems of exclusion that are hidden or naturalized and thus rendered invisible to other methodological approaches. “Claiming Space for an Engaged Anthropology” is doubly meant: to claim more intellectual and professional space for engagement and to propose that anthropology include the dimension of space as a theoretical construct. I draw on three fieldwork examples to illustrate the value of the approach: (1) a Spanish American plaza, reclaimed from a Eurocentric past, for indigenous groups and contemporary cultural interpretation; (2) Moore Street Market, an enclosed Latino food market in Brooklyn, New York, reclaimed for a translocal set of social relations rather than a gentrified redevelopment project; (3) gated communities in Texas and New York and cooperatives in New York, reclaiming public space and confronting race and class segregation created by neoliberal enclosure and securitization. Read More

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October 2012
1 Read

Framing postpartum hemorrhage as a consequence of human placental biology: an evolutionary and comparative perspective.

Am Anthropol 2011 ;113(3):417-30

University of Illinois, Chicago.

Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide, is responsible for 35 percent of maternal deaths. Proximately, PPH results from the failure of the placenta to separate from the uterine wall properly, most often because of impairment of uterine muscle contraction. Despite its prevalence and its well-described clinical manifestations, the ultimate causes of PPH are not known and have not been investigated through an evolutionary lens. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1548-1433.2011.01351.x
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1548-1433.2011.01351.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3168987PMC
October 2012
1 Read

Nature/culture/seawater.

Authors:
Stefan Helmreich

Am Anthropol 2011 ;113(1):132-44

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge.

Seawater has occupied an ambiguous place in anthropological categories of "nature" and "culture." Seawater as nature appears as potentiality of form and uncontainable flux; it moves faster than culture - with culture frequently figured through land-based metaphors - even as culture seeks to channel water's (nature's) flow. Seawater as culture manifests as a medium of pleasure, sustenance, travel, disaster. Read More

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Biological ancestries, kinship connections, and projected identities in four central Anatolian settlements: insights from culturally contextualized genetic anthropology.

Am Anthropol 2011 ;113(1):116-31

Harvard University Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston.

Previous population genetics studies in Turkey failed to delineate recent historical and social factors that shaped Anatolian cultural and genetic diversity at the local level. To address this shortcoming, we conducted focused ethnohistorical fieldwork and screened biological samples collected from the Yuksekyer region for mitochondrial, Y chromosome, and autosomal markers and then analyzed the data within an ethnohistorical context. Our results revealed that, at the village level, paternal genetic diversity is structured among settlements, whereas maternal genetic diversity is distributed more homogenously, reflecting the strong patrilineal cultural traditions that transcend larger ethnic and religious structures. Read More

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June 2011
5 Reads

Campus sustainable food projects: critique and engagement.

Authors:
Peggy F Barlett

Am Anthropol 2011 ;113(1):101-15

Emory University, GA.

Campus sustainable food projects recently have expanded rapidly. A review of four components - purchasing goals, academic programs, direct marketing, and experiential learning - shows both intent and capacity to contribute to transformational change toward an alternative food system. The published rationales for campus projects and specific purchasing guidelines join curricular and cocurricular activities to evaluate, disseminate, and legitimize environmental, economic, social justice, and health concerns about conventional food. Read More

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June 2011
9 Reads

Can Traditions Emerge from the Interaction of Stimulus Enhancement and Reinforcement Learning? An Experimental Model.

Am Anthropol 2010 Jun;112(2):257-269

Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138.

The study of social learning in captivity and behavioral traditions in the wild are two burgeoning areas of research, but few empirical studies have tested how learning mechanisms produce emergent patterns of tradition. Studies have examined how social learning mechanisms that are cognitively complex and possessed by few species, such as imitation, result in traditional patterns, yet traditional patterns are also exhibited by species that may not possess such mechanisms. We propose an explicit model of how stimulus enhancement and reinforcement learning could interact to produce traditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1548-1433.2010.01224.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2996617PMC
June 2010
1 Read

A child's house: social memory, identity, and the construction of childhood in early postclassic Mexican households.

Authors:
Kristin De Lucia

Am Anthropol 2010 ;112(4):607-24

Northwestern University.

Despite the recent attention given to the archaeology of childhood, households continue to be treated by archaeologists as the product of adult behavior and activities. Yet children shaped the decisions and motivations of adults and influenced the structure and organization of daily activities and household space. Further, children's material culture serves to both create and disrupt social norms and daily life, making children essential to understanding broader mechanisms of change and continuity. Read More

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Cultural patterns of trauma among 19th-century-born males in cadaver collections.

Am Anthropol 2010 ;112(4):589-606

University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Comprehending violence among bioarchaeological and historical groups is a topic of recent interest among biological anthropologists. This research examines trauma among African American and Euro-American males of low socioeconomic status born between 1825 and 1877. A total of 651 male skeletons from the Cobb, Terry, and Hamann-Todd anatomical collections were macroscopically evaluated for skeletal trauma, based on the presence of fractures and weapon-related wounds, and statistically analyzed according to ancestry, birth (Antebellum, Civil War, Reconstruction), combined ancestry - birth, and collection cohorts. Read More

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Torture by Cieng: ethical theory meets social practice among the Dinka Agaar of south Sudan.

Authors:
Jeffery L Deal

Am Anthropol 2010 ;112(4):563-75

Medical University of South Carolina.

Here I detail violence in South Sudan by first discussing a specific Dinka Agaar practice alongside existing discourses on the social aspects of violence and universal human rights, then I show how these acts had meaning and purpose using data from personal accounts of violence. I posit that the violence described was consistent with Dinka Agaar concepts of justice and basic human rights and that it cannot be judged against any universal human rights standard, devoid of local context or of an overarching metanarrative. These events highlight conflicting subjectivities, ethical norms, and the painful difficulties inherent to advocacy in areas of conflict. Read More

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Pocahontas Goes to the Clinic: Popular Culture as Lingua Franca in a Cultural Borderland.

Authors:
Cheryl Mattingly

Am Anthropol 2008 Apr;108(3):494-501

Departments of Anthropology and Occupational Science and Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0032.

Urban hospitals constitute an example of what is arguably the most visible site in anthropology these days-the border zone. Negotiating health care requires trafficking in tricky spaces where patients and their families must pay vigilant attention about when to submit, when to resist, and how to collaborate. Drawing from ethnographic research carried out over the past nine years among African American families who have children with severe illnesses and disabilities, I examine how children's popular culture operates in the fraught borderland that constitutes the urban clinic. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2920152PMC
April 2008
32 Reads

Female-selective abortion in Asia: patterns, policies, and debates.

Authors:
B D Miller

Am Anthropol 2001 Dec;103(4):1083-95

Department of Anthropology, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA.

Since the early 1980s, the use of sex-selective abortion increased in many Asian contexts. Estimates indicate that several million female fetuses were aborted in the last two decades of the twentieth century. This article takes a currently unusual approach for a cultural anthropologist in pursuing cross-national comparisons of trends in sex-selective abortion. Read More

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December 2001
4 Reads

Commodified kin: death, mourning, and competing claims on the bodies of organ donors in the United States.

Authors:
L A Sharp

Am Anthropol 2001 Mar;103(1):112-33

Department of Anthropology, Barnard College, New York, NY 10027, USA.

A pronounced disjunction characterizes symbolic constructions of the cadaveric donor body in the United States, where procurement professionals and surviving donor kin vie with one another in their desires to honor this unusual category of the dead. Of special concern is the medicalized commodification of donor bodies, a process that shapes both their social worth and emotional value. Among professionals, metaphorical thinking is key: death and body fragmentation are cloaked in ecological imagery that stresses renewal and rebirth. Read More

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In the shadow of "death with dignity": medicine and cultural quandaries of the vegetative state.

Authors:
S R Kaufman

Am Anthropol 2000 Mar;102(1):69-83

In this paper I address one site of technological development and cultural production, the permanent or persistent comatose condition and the institutions and practices that enable this life form to exist. As with other medical sites of ambiguity and change under recent scrutiny by anthropologists, the locations in which comatose bodies thrive are those in which the routinization of technology use in the clinic and a legitimating social and economic context come together to permit and create a further remapping of the notions of "life" and "person." I explore the new forms of knowledge, practice, and the body that are created at this site and how they are negotiated, and I discuss how the shifting understanding of "culture" and "nature" both have an impact on and are informed by American quandaries about approaching death. Read More

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Narrating September 11: Race, Gender, and the Play of Cultural Identities.

Am Anthropol 2002 Sep;104(3):743-753

Department of Anthropology and Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0032.

This article considers the September 11 tragedy as an event that has created a powerful experience-an astonishing and unthinkable "breach" from the expected and routine-that has riveted the American public and provoked personal storytelling. September 11 and its aftermath have provided an occasion for rethinking and reworking cultural identity. We explore how September 11 and subsequent events have been experienced, constructed, and narrated by African American women, primarily from working-class and low-income backgrounds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/aa.2002.104.3.743DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2919762PMC
September 2002
2 Reads

The Fragility of Healing.

Am Anthropol 2001 Mar;29(1):30-57

Professor with the Department of Anthropology and Department of Occupational Science and Therapy, University of Southern California.

This article explores a paradox-the simultaneous cultivation and suppression of "healing dramas" by pediatric rehabilitation therapists. Dramatic moments are defined as ones in which the routine exercises and treatment activities of therapeutic practice are transformed into narrative plots. These improvisational plots involve multiple characters, risks, suspense, and above all, a heightened sense that something is at stake. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/eth.2001.29.1.30DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2949978PMC
March 2001
1 Read

"Real Belizean food": building local identity in the transnational Caribbean.

Authors:
R R Wilk

Am Anthropol 1999 ;101(2):244-55

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Green dots, pink hearts: displacing politics from the Malaysian rain forest.

Authors:
J P Brosius

Am Anthropol 1999 ;101(1):36-57

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Fear of selfing in the American cultural imaginary or "you are never alone with a clone".

Authors:
D Battaglia

Am Anthropol 1995 Dec;97(4):672-8

Mount Holyoke College, USA.

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December 1995

Culture and sociobiology.

Authors:
Jerome H Barkow

Am Anthropol 1978 Mar;80(1):5-20

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On Mexican folk medicine.

Authors:
J M Ingham

Am Anthropol 1970 Feb;72(1):76-87

In this paper traditional medical beliefs and practices in a Mexican village are described and interpreted. The analysis focuses on the notion that health is a balance of hot and cold within the body. Several lines of evidence are used to reveal the metaphorical meanings of hot and cold, and these meanings are then seen to be related to structural features of peasant society. Read More

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February 1970

The psychological interdependence of family, school, and bureaucracy in Japan.

Authors:
C W Kiefer

Am Anthropol 1970 Feb;72(1):66-75

The Japanese "examination hell" phenomenon is viewed as a series of crisis rites through which the child passes from family-centered to peer group - centered values in a "particularistic" society. It is held that this model has greater explanatory power than the "minimization of competition" model proposed by others and that it also helps to explain the phenomenon of student radicalism and centrifugal relationships in middle-class communities. Read More

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February 1970

Physical anthropology: the search for general processes and principles.

Authors:
G W Lasker

Am Anthropol 1970 Feb;72(1):1-8

Physical anthropology consists of two interdependent types of study: (1) the biological history of man and (2) general biological processes in man (such as mechanisms of evolution and growth). Popular interest may focus on the former, the fascinating story of the origin of man and of specific people, but the latter affords physical anthropology potential practical value in respect to medicine, dentistry, public health, and population policy. The study of general processes is the study of human beings in particular situations, not for what we can learn about these particular populations but for the sake of generalization about mankind anywhere in comparable situations. Read More

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February 1970
2 Reads

Recent trends in Soviet anthropology.

Authors:
D B SHIMKIN

Am Anthropol 1949 Oct-Dec;4(Pt 1 51):621-5

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February 2014

Premarital freedom on Truk; theory and practice.

Authors:
W H GOODENOUGH

Am Anthropol 1949 Oct-Dec;51(4):615-20

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February 2014

Parallels in the development of shamanism among northern and southern Athapaskans.

Authors:
J J HONIGMANN

Am Anthropol 1949 Jul-Sep;51(3):512-4

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December 2007

Methodological problems in the anthropological study of modern cultures.

Authors:
J GILLIN

Am Anthropol 1949 Jul-Sep;51(3):392-9

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December 2007

RESEARCH projects recommended by the Committee on Asian Anthropology, National Research Council.

Authors:

Am Anthropol 1949 Jul-Sep;51(3):537

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December 2007

SCHOOL of medical illustration.

Authors:

Am Anthropol 1949 Jul-Sep;51(3):534

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December 2007

White's view of a science of culture.

Am Anthropol 1949 Jul-Sep;51(3):503-12

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December 2007

Ethnolinguistics and the study of culture.

Am Anthropol 1949 Jul-Sep;51(3):446-56

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December 2007

Psychological characteristics of acculturated Wisconsin Ojibwa children.

Authors:
W CAUDILL

Am Anthropol 1949 Jul-Sep;51(3):409-27

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December 2007