2,616 results match your criteria American Annals Of The Deaf[Journal]


Volume 163.

Authors:

Am Ann Deaf 2019 ;163(5):619-623

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2019.0006DOI Listing
January 2019

Schooling Effects on Early Literacy Skills of Young Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children.

Am Ann Deaf 2019 ;163(5):596-618

Already well documented for hearing children, schooling's effects on early literacy skills for young students who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) were examined for the first time in the present study. Piecewise growth curve modeling was used to describe 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old students' growth in phonological awareness, letter-word identification, and vocabulary during 2 years of schooling and the intervening summer (N = 56). Amplification mode was cochlear implants for 45% of the sample and hearing aids for 54%. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2019.0005DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Friendships and Self-Determination Among Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

Am Ann Deaf 2019 ;163(5):576-595

Friendships and self-determination are two factors that positively influence success in school and adult life. Examining the relationship between these two constructs among a sample of students who were deaf or hard of hearing (DHH), the researchers used the Self-Determination Inventory: Student Report (Shogren, Wehmeyer, Burke, & Palmer, 2017) to measure the level of self-determination of 29 students ages 13-17 years who were DHH. The researchers then used two self-report measures to probe students' quantity and quality of friendships, and conducted an analysis to determine whether the quality and quantity of friendships correlated with the self-determination of the students. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2019.0004DOI Listing
January 2019

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students' Understanding of Causal and Adversative Connectives in Sentence Reading.

Authors:
Jingqi Yan Degao Li

Am Ann Deaf 2019 ;163(5):554-573

Deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students tend to experience delayed development of grammatical skills in written language. However, much remains unknown about the mechanism behind this phenomenon. In the present study, the researchers used a self-paced moving-window reading task to investigate DHH students' understanding of causal and adversative connectives in Chinese. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2019.0003DOI Listing
January 2019

Perspectives of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Viewers of Captions.

Authors:
Janine Butler

Am Ann Deaf 2019 ;163(5):534-553

Educational rights and other rights enumerated in federal law support deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) viewers' access to captions in visual electronic media, yet uncaptioned and inadequately captioned media still exist. To determine what is satisfactory in captioned media and what could be improved to ensure access, data were gathered from focus group discussions with 20 DHH students who shared their perspectives on captions. The focus group analysis indicates that major topics of concern for DHH viewers include advocacy for captions and caption formatting preferences; the need for direct access to real-time videos, online videos, and other media; how captions influence and benefit DHH and hearing viewers; and captions' importance in public, educational, and other social/cultural spaces. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://muse.jhu.edu/article/716190
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2019.0002DOI Listing
January 2019
13 Reads

Teaching Academic Language to d/Deaf Students: Does Research Offer Evidence for Practice?

Am Ann Deaf 2019 ;163(5):501-533

The authors culled evidence-based recommendations and guidelines for effective instruction from practice guides and national studies addressing the development of academic language in English Language Learners (ELLs). Working within the framework of the qualitative similarity hypothesis (Paul, Wang, & Williams, 2013), the authors used the evidence base from the ELL literature as a starting point for researching similar findings with d/Deaf students. The etic areas of academic talk, reading comprehension, vocabulary, writing, technology, teacher training, sheltered instruction, and small-group instruction are discussed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://muse.jhu.edu/article/716189
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2019.0001DOI Listing
January 2019
17 Reads

A Phenomenological Study of Parenting Stress Among Korean Mothers of Deaf Children.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(4):440-462

Using phenomenological methods, the authors examined the kinds of parenting stresses experienced by Korean mothers of deaf children. The participants were 5 Korean mothers ages 45-50 years whose children's communication mode was spoken language. As a result of their data analysis, the researchers constructed 21 concepts and 7 categories, the categories being "Frustration with parenting their child," "Struggling between mainstream education and special education," "Continuing to be alienated from mainstream education settings," "Feeling left out and hurt in family relationships," "Making a sacrifice for the child," "Change in values of life," and "Importance of services meeting parents' needs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://muse.jhu.edu/article/706240
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0028DOI Listing
January 2018
12 Reads

Experience of Hearing Loss, Communication, Social Participation, and Psychological Well-Being Among Adolescents With Cochlear Implants.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(4):424-439

Pediatric cochlear implantation has successfully provided many congenitally deaf children the opportunity to learn to hear and speak. However, outcomes are mostly assessed through formal audiological testing or by gathering perspectives of parents and teachers rather than the children themselves. Sixty-five children with cochlear implants (CIs) aged 11-15 years were asked about their CI use and other factors related to communication, experiences of hearing loss, social participation and friendships, and psychological well-being. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://muse.jhu.edu/article/706239
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0027DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Deaf or Hearing: A Hard of Hearing Individual's Navigation Between Two Worlds.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(3):394-412

Identity construction and how an individual chooses to navigate or display his or her identity play an important role in how that person communicates and interacts with others. One group for whom identity construction and navigation is a difficult process is the hard of hearing population. In the present study, Communication Theory of Identity (Hecht, 1993) and interactive interviews were used to gain insight into four layers of identity-personal, relational, enacted, and communal-in the hard of hearing individual. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0025DOI Listing
January 2018

Nonsymbolic Comparison in Deaf Students: No Evidence for a Deficit in Numerosity Processing.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(3):374-393

It is commonly found that deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students experience delayed mathematical achievement. The present study used two nonsymbolic comparison tasks to explore the basic numerical skills of DHH students. Nine prelocutive DHH students with cochlear implants and nine hearing students, matched on nonverbal IQ, visual short-term memory, and verbal comprehension, were recruited. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0024DOI Listing
January 2018
1 Read

Service Providers' Perspective on the Education of Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and English Learners.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(3):356-373

The researchers examine the perspectives of service providers involved in educating students who are both deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) and English Learners (EL). Using qualitative phenomenology methodology, the researchers interviewed eight service providers in one school district about their perspectives on the unique challenges and issues related to educating students who are DHH EL. An overarching finding was the uniqueness of each individual student, which was found in the combination of factors, or "influencers of diversity" (Leigh, 2008, p. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0023DOI Listing
January 2018
18 Reads

Bedouin Hearing Parents of Children With Hearing Loss: Stress, Coping, and Quality of Life.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(3):328-355

The authors examine parenting stress and coping strategies and their relation to satisfaction with family quality of life in a unique population: hearing Bedouin parents of children born with partial or total hearing loss in southern Israel. Could variables previously shown to predict families' quality of life in other populations with children with hearing loss also predict it in this underserved population? The study participants were 84 parents who responded to questionnaires. It was found that parenting stress affects satisfaction with the family's everyday functioning and that parents cope mainly by obtaining familial and social support and redefining the crisis situation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0022DOI Listing
January 2018

Hundred Languages of Deaf Children: Exploring the Reggio Emilia Approach in Deaf Education.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(3):294-327

The study investigated the "hundred languages of Deaf children" (Malaguzzi, 1993) in two schools using the Reggio Emilia approach to early childhood education, which originated in Italy. One principle of this approach, "the hundred languages of children," supports young children in expressing their ideas and thoughts in different ways. The hundred languages include expression through written, spoken, and signed languages, among many other means, and children are empowered to express themselves using these multiple channels. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0021DOI Listing
January 2018

Research on Deafness.

Authors:

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(2):278-284

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0019DOI Listing
January 2018

Advocacy, Support, and Rehabilitation Programs.

Authors:

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(2):245-277

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0018DOI Listing
January 2018

Programs for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults.

Authors:

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(2):232-244

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0017DOI Listing
January 2018

University and College Programs for Personnel in Deafness.

Authors:

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(2):209-231

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0016DOI Listing
January 2018

Educational Programs for Deaf Students.

Authors:

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(2):116-208

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0015DOI Listing
January 2018

A Breast Cancer Education Program for D/deaf Women.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(2):90-115

Barriers to obtaining breast cancer prevention knowledge and breast cancer screening have been noted among D/deaf women. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) is described that tested a culturally and linguistically tailored breast cancer education program conducted among a racially/ethnically diverse sample of 209 D/deaf women age 40 years or older. The study focused on D/deaf women with no more than a secondary education, a population at relatively high risk for incomplete breast health knowledge and services. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0014DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Deaf Children and Their Families: Sustainability, Sign Language, and Equality.

Authors:
Alys Young

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(1):61-69

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0011DOI Listing
January 2018
4 Reads

The Impact of Language Input on Deaf and Hard of Hearing Preschool Children Who Use Listening and Spoken Language.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(1):35-60

The researchers investigated the effects of adult language input on the quantity of language, vocabulary development, and understanding of basic concepts of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children who used listening and spoken language. Using audio recording and Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) software, the study involved 30 preschool DHH children who used spoken language as their communication modality and 11 typically hearing same-age peers. The children's language and the language spoken to them during all waking hours over a 2-day period (16 hours per day) were recorded and analyzed quantitatively and were compared to the children's performance on the Boehm Test of Basic Concepts and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0010DOI Listing
January 2018

Hearing Managers of Deaf Workers: A Phenomenological Investigation in the Restaurant Industry.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;163(1):13-34

The study examined the experiences of hearing managers of Deaf restaurant employees regarding accommodation and social integration. Deaf workers who use American Sign Language have different social and accommodation needs than hearing coworkers, but most hearing managers are unfamiliar with these needs. Using stigma theory to frame issues of workplace accommodation and social integration, the researchers collected data through site observation and in-depth semistructured interviews with 6 hearing managers of high-volume restaurants and 6 Deaf employees. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0009DOI Listing
January 2018
3 Reads

Annual Index 2017 - 2018.

Authors:

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;162(5):489-492

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0007DOI Listing
January 2018

In the Rearview Mirror: Social Skill Development in Deaf Youth, 1990-2015.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;162(5):479-485

Social skills are a vehicle by which individuals negotiate important relationships. The present article presents historical data on how social skills in deaf students were conceptualized and studied empirically during the period 1990-2015. Using a structured literature review approach, the researchers coded 266 articles for theoretical frameworks used and constructs studied. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0005DOI Listing
January 2018

Exploring the Social Capital of Adolescents Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Their Parents: A Preliminary Investigation.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;162(5):463-478

The study explored the social capital of Australian adolescents who were deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) and their parents, and investigated the relationship between social capital and individual characteristics, language, literacy, and psychosocial outcomes. Sixteen adolescents (ages 11-14 years) and 24 parents enrolled in the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI) study completed an online questionnaire on social capital and psychosocial outcomes. Information about demographics, language, and literacy was retrieved from the LOCHI study database. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5830144PMC
January 2018

Selected Factors in Reading Comprehension for Deaf and Hearing Adults: Phonological Skills and Metacognition.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;162(5):445-462

The purpose of the study was to identify factors related to reading comprehension, and to compare similarities and differences in the reading processes of deaf and hearing adults. The sample included four groups, each consisting of 15 adults. The groups were identified as (a) deaf high-achieving readers, (b) deaf low-achieving readers, (c) hearing high-achieving readers, and (d) hearing low-achieving readers. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0003DOI Listing
January 2018
1 Read

A Grounded Theory of Effective Reading by Profoundly Deaf Adults.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;162(5):419-444

The purpose of the study was to uncover and describe psycholinguistic and sociocognitive factors facilitating effective reading by signing adults who are profoundly deaf and do not use hearing technology. The sample comprised four groups, each consisting of 15 adults, for a total of 60 participants. The four groups were deaf high-achieving, deaf low-achieving, hearing high-achieving, and hearing low-achieving. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0002DOI Listing
January 2018

Deaf Education Teacher Preparation: A Phenomenological Case Study of a Graduate Program With a Comprehensive Philosophy.

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;162(5):388-418

At a time when deaf education teacher preparation programs are declining in number, little is known about their actual effectiveness. A phenomenological case study of a graduate-level comprehensive deaf education teacher preparation program at a midwestern university explored empowered and enabled learning of teacher candidates using the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education educator pillars: (a) commitment to the profession, (b) proficiency in practice, and (c) learning impact, all deemed critical to developing quality teachers. A strong connection was found between the program's comprehensive philosophy and its practice. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0001DOI Listing
January 2018

Philosophy of Deafness: A Perspective.

Authors:

Am Ann Deaf 2018 ;162(5):383-387

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2018.0000DOI Listing
January 2018

Erratum.

Authors:

Am Ann Deaf 2017 ;162(4):380

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2017.0036DOI Listing
January 2017

Sign Language Legislation as a Tool for Sustainability.

Authors:
Annika Pabsch

Am Ann Deaf 2017;162(4):365-376

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2017.0034DOI Listing
January 2017
1 Read

How Do Deaf Adults Define Quality of Life?

Am Ann Deaf 2017 ;162(4):333-349

Six deaf adults defined quality of life (QOL) in personal interviews. Questions were based on an eight-domain QOL framework: physical well-being, emotional well-being, interpersonal relations, social inclusion, personal development, material well-being, self-determination, and rights (Schalock & Alonso, 2002). The interview process had three phases. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2017.0031DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

The Relationship Between Cochlear Implants and Deaf Identity.

Am Ann Deaf 2017 ;162(4):319-332

The degree to which individuals with cochlear implants (CIs) experience communication difficulties has implications for social participation and identity development. However, few studies have examined the relationship between cochlear implantation, identity, and social participation. Using data from a Danish national survey of deaf adults, the authors examined the significance of having (or not having) a CI in regard to identity (categorized as deaf, hearing, bicultural, and marginal) and various related factors concerning social participation and experiences of being deaf. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2017.0030DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

The Metaphysical Itch.

Authors:
Peter V Paul

Am Ann Deaf 2017;162(4):315-318

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2017.0029DOI Listing
January 2017

A Systematic Review of the Use of LENA Technology.

Am Ann Deaf 2017 ;162(3):295-311

The authors systematically reviewed peer-reviewed studies done with LENA (Language ENvironment Analysis) technology, guided by three research questions: (a) What types of studies have been conducted, and with which populations, since the launch of LENA technology? (b) What challenges related to use of LENA technology were identified? (c) What are the implications for practice and future research using LENA technology? Electronic databases, the LENA Research Foundation website, and bibliographies of already-included studies were searched; 38 studies were identified. The authors selected studies on the basis of purpose, design, participant characteristics, application of LENA technology, and results. They found that LENA technology was used with a range of populations to yield a variety of information. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2017.0028DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

National Provisions for Certification and Professional Preparation in Low-Incidence Sensory Disabilities: A 50-State Study.

Am Ann Deaf 2017 ;162(3):277-294

A multimethod study examined the 50 U.S. states' preparation and licensure practices regarding students with low-incidence sensory disabilities (LISD). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2017.0026DOI Listing

The Effect of Handwriting Training on Language Learning Among Deaf Children and Their Matched Hearing Peers in China.

Am Ann Deaf 2017 ;162(3):265-276

Comparing deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children with their hearing peers in learning Chinese, the study tested the lexical quality hypothesis (Perfetti, 1992, 2007), which asserts the importance of building orthographic, phonological, and semantic connections in high-quality lexical representations. DHH children and hearing peers matched on reading age were randomly assigned to one of two groups: One received writing training on both Day 1 and Day 2; the other received pinyin typing training on Day 1 and writing training on Day 2. Compared with younger hearing controls, DHH children showed equivalent vocabulary acquisition and appeared to benefit from orthography training. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2017.0025DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

Unregulated Autonomy: Uncredentialed Educational Interpreters in Rural Schools.

Am Ann Deaf 2017 ;162(3):253-264

Although many rural Deaf and Hard of Hearing students attend public schools most of the day and use the services of educational interpreters to gain access to the school environment, little information exists on what interpreters are doing in rural school systems in the absence of credentialing requirements. The researcher used ethnographic interviews and field observations of three educational interpreters with no certification or professional assessment to explore how uncredentialed interpreters were enacting their role in a rural high school. The findings indicate that uncredentialed interpreters in rural settings perform four major functions during their school day: preparing the environment, staff, and materials; interpreting a variety of content; interacting with numerous stakeholders; and directly instructing Deaf and Hard of Hearing students. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2017.0024DOI Listing

Dr. Andrew Foster: A Literature Review.

Authors:
Joel Runnels

Am Ann Deaf 2017 ;162(3):243-252

Often compared to Laurent Clerc, Thomas Gallaudet, and Alexander Graham Bell, Dr. Andrew Foster was a deaf African American who founded 32 schools for the deaf in 13 African nations. The 60th anniversary of his arrival in Liberia and Ghana and the 30th anniversary of his tragic death in a Rwanda airplane accident both occur in 2017. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2017.0023DOI Listing

The Mythical Average in an Age of Individual Complexity.

Authors:
Peter V Paul

Am Ann Deaf 2017 ;162(3):239-242

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/aad.2017.0027DOI Listing
January 2017