24,876 results match your criteria Am J Psychiatry[Journal]


Neurobiology of Self-Regulation: Longitudinal Influence of FKBP5 and Intimate Partner Violence on Emotional and Cognitive Development in Childhood.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr 5:appiajp201918091018. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

The Department of Translational Research in Psychiatry, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich (Halldorsdottir, Kurtoic, Müller-Myhsok, Binder); the Center of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík (Halldorsdottir); the Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, U.K. (Müller-Myhsok); the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta (Binder); the Department of Applied Psychology, New York University, New York (Blair); the Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Family Life Project Key Investigators).

Objective:: Self-regulation includes the volitional and nonvolitional regulation of emotional, cognitive, and physiological responses to stimulation. It develops from infancy through individual characteristics and the environment, with the stress hormone system as a central player. Accordingly, the authors hypothesized that genes involved in regulating the stress system, such as FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5), interact with early-life stress exposure, such as exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV), to predict self-regulation indicators and associated outcomes, including behavioral and learning problems in school. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.18091018DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Polygenic Risk: Predicting Depression Outcomes in Clinical and Epidemiological Cohorts of Youths.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr 5:appiajp201918091014. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Department of Translational Research in Psychiatry, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich (Halldorsdottir, Czamara, Rex-Haffner, Binder); Center of Public Health Sciences (Halldorsdottir) and Landspitali National University Hospital, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Arnarson); Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics, and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich (Piechaczek, Pehl, Wagenbuechler, Feldmann, Quickenstedt-Reinhardt, Allgaier, Greimel, Schulte-Körne); Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal (Soares de Matos); Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of the German Federal Armed Forces, Neubiberg, Germany (Allgaier); KBO Heckscher Hospital, Munich (Freisleder); Department of Psychology and Logopedics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Kvist, Lahti, Räikkönen); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Craighead, Binder) and Department of Psychology (Craighead), Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta; Major Depressive Disorder Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (see online supplement for list of researchers).

Objective:: Identifying risk factors for major depression and depressive symptoms in youths could have important implications for prevention efforts. This study examined the association of polygenic risk scores (PRSs) for a broad depression phenotype derived from a large-scale genome-wide association study (GWAS) in adults, and its interaction with childhood abuse, with clinically relevant depression outcomes in clinical and epidemiological youth cohorts.

Methods:: The clinical cohort comprised 279 youths with major depression (mean age=14. Read More

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http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.18
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.18091014DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

General Predictors and Moderators of Depression Remission: A VAST-D Report.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr 5:appiajp201818091079. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

VA San Diego Healthcare System (Zisook, Tal); the Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego (Zisook); Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven (Johnson, Zhao); the Department of Psychiatry, Texas A&M College of Medicine, Temple (Hicks); Louis Stokes VA Medical Center and the Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland (Chen); Tuscaloosa VA Medical Center, Tuscaloosa, Ala. (Davis); University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham (Davis); Philadelphia VA Medical Center (Thase); Cooperative Studies Program Clinical Research Pharmacy Coordinating Center, Albuquerque, N.Mex. (Vertrees); and the VA New England Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven (Mohamed).

Objective:: Almost two-thirds of patients with major depressive disorder do not achieve remission with initial treatments. Thus, identifying and providing effective, feasible, and safe "next-step" treatments are clinical imperatives. This study explores patient baseline features that might help clinicians select between commonly used next-step treatments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18091079DOI Listing
April 2019
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Disclosure of Editors' Financial Relationships.

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Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr;176(4):324

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.17604324DOI Listing

Treatment of Depression Versus Treatment of PTSD.

Authors:
Steven D Hollon

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr;176(4):259-261

The Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.19020173DOI Listing

Optimizing the Efficacy of Psychotherapy, Cognitive Training, and Internet Interventions.

Authors:
Ned H Kalin

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr;176(4):257-258

Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.19020161DOI Listing

CORRECTION.

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Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr;176(4):324

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.1764correction2DOI Listing

Has the Time Come for Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia…Again?

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr;176(4):262-264

From the Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (Vinogradov).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.19020160DOI Listing
April 2019
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Cognitive Remediation and Social Skills Training for Schizotypal Personality Disorder: Greater Gains With Guanfacine?

Authors:
Susan R McGurk

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr;176(4):265-266

Department of Occupational Therapy and Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation, Boston University, Boston.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.19020144DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Psychiatric Comorbidity in Moyamoya Disease and Preliminary Guidelines For Treatment.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr;176(4):269-274

The Department of Psychiatry, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles.

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http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18040404DOI Listing
April 2019
8 Reads

CORRECTION.

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Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr;176(4):324

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.1764correction1DOI Listing

Using Insomnia as a Model for Optimizing Internet-Delivered Psychotherapy.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr;176(4):267-268

Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.19020128DOI Listing
April 2019
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Pharmacogenomic Variants and Drug Interactions Identified Through the Genetic Analysis of Clozapine Metabolism.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar 29:appiajp201918050589. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales (Pardiñas, Nalmpanti, Pocklington, Legge, Medway, Zammit, Owen, O'Donovan, Walters); Magna Laboratories, Ross-on-Wye, U.K. (King); Leyden Delta, Nijmegen, the Netherlands (Jansen, Helthuis); the Centre for Academic Mental Health, Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, U.K. (Zammit); the National Institute for Health Research, Biomedical Research Centre, University of Bristol, Bristol, U.K. (Zammit); and the Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London (MacCabe).

Objective:: Clozapine is the only effective medication for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but its worldwide use is still limited because of its complex titration protocols. While the discovery of pharmacogenomic variants of clozapine metabolism may improve clinical management, no robust findings have yet been reported. This study is the first to adopt the framework of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) to discover genetic markers of clozapine plasma concentrations in a large sample of patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.18050589DOI Listing
March 2019
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Single, Repeated, and Maintenance Ketamine Infusions for Treatment-Resistant Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar 29:appiajp201818070834. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

From the Mood Disorders Research Unit, The Royal's Institute of Mental Health Research, Ottawa (Phillips, Norris, Talbot, Birmingham, Hatchard, Ortiz, Owoeye, Batten, Blier); the Department of Psychiatry, University of Ottawa (Phillips, Norris, Talbot, Owoeye, Blier); and the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa (Blier).

Objective:: Subanesthetic ketamine doses have been shown to have rapid yet transient antidepressant effects in patients with treatment-resistant depression, which may be prolonged by repeated administration. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antidepressant effects of a single ketamine infusion, a series of repeated ketamine infusions, and prolongation of response with maintenance infusions.

Methods:: Forty-one participants with treatment-resistant depression completed a single-site randomized double-blind crossover comparison of single infusions of ketamine and midazolam (an active placebo control). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18070834DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Burnout and Depression: Same Phenomenon or Overlapping Constructs? Response to Bianchi et al.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Jan;176(1):79-80

Department of Psychiatry, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18091026rDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Controlled Substances in the Polydrug Epidemic: Response to Diller.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Jan;176(1):78

Institute for Behavior and Health, Rockville, Md. (DuPont); Center on Young Adult Health and Development, Department of Behavioral and Community Health, University of Maryland School of Public Health, College Park (Arria).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18080948r2DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson's Disease.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Jan;176(1):5-11

The Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (Weintraub and Mamikonyan); and the Parkinson's Disease Research, Education, and Clinical Center and the Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia (Weintraub).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18040465DOI Listing
January 2019
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Comment on Prevalence and Correlates of Prescription Stimulant Use, Misuse, Use Disorders, and Motivations for Misuse Among Adults in the United States.

Authors:
Lawrence Diller

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Jan;176(1):77

Private practice and Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18080948DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Misuse of Immediate-Release Stimulants: Response to Diller.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Jan;176(1):77-78

National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, Md. (Compton, Blanco); Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockville, Md. (Han, Jones).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18080948rDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Polygenic Risk Scores in Clinical Schizophrenia Research.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Jan;176(1):3-4

From the Lieber Institute for Brain Development and Maltz Research Laboratories, Baltimore; and the Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neuroscience and the McNusick Nathans Institute of Genomic Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18111274DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Use of Disulfiram for Treatment of Alcohol Addiction in Patients With Psychotic Illness.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Jan;176(1):80-81

Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18070795DOI Listing
January 2019

An Introduction and Vision.

Authors:
Ned H Kalin

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Jan;176(1):1-2

Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18111286DOI Listing
January 2019

The Trouble With Burnout: An Update on Burnout-Depression Overlap.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Jan;176(1):79

Institute of Work and Organizational Psychology, University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerland (Bianchi); Department of Psychology, the City College of the City University of New York, New York (Schonfeld); Laboratory of Psychology (EA 3188), University of Burgundy-Franche-Comté, Besançon, France (Laurent).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18091026DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Thinking About Schizophrenia in an Era of Genomic Medicine.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Jan;176(1):12-20

The Lieber Institute for Brain Development and Maltz Research Laboratories, Baltimore; and the Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neuroscience and the McNusick Nathans Institute of Genomic Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore.

Genetic discoveries about human brain development and neuropsychiatric syndromes have changed the landscape of psychiatric research. The genotyping of hundreds of thousands of individuals has identified many hundreds of genomic regions that are associated with psychiatric diagnoses, and progress is being made in uncovering the specific genes that underlie these statistical associations, although most are still undetermined. While there are great expectations that such genetic discoveries will lead to novel treatments based on fundamental mechanisms of illness, there are important caveats. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18111275DOI Listing
January 2019
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No Support for Historical Candidate Gene or Candidate Gene-by-Interaction Hypotheses for Major Depression Across Multiple Large Samples.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar 8:appiajp201818070881. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

The Institute for Behavioral Genetics (Border, Johnson, Evans, Smolen, Keller), the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience (Border, Berley, Keller), the Department of Applied Mathematics (Border), and the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (Evans), University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder; the Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis (Johnson); the Department of Genetics and Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Sullivan); and the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sullivan).

Objective:: Interest in candidate gene and candidate gene-by-environment interaction hypotheses regarding major depressive disorder remains strong despite controversy surrounding the validity of previous findings. In response to this controversy, the present investigation empirically identified 18 candidate genes for depression that have been studied 10 or more times and examined evidence for their relevance to depression phenotypes.

Methods:: Utilizing data from large population-based and case-control samples (Ns ranging from 62,138 to 443,264 across subsamples), the authors conducted a series of preregistered analyses examining candidate gene polymorphism main effects, polymorphism-by-environment interactions, and gene-level effects across a number of operational definitions of depression (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18070881DOI Listing
March 2019
12.295 Impact Factor

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Executive Functioning Training Compared With Perceptual Training for Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders: Effects on Neurophysiology, Neurocognition, and Functioning.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr 8;176(4):297-306. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

From the Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Best, Milanovic, Bowie); and the Department of Psychiatry, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Iftene).

Objective:: Cognitive remediation is an efficacious treatment for schizophrenia. However, different theoretical approaches have developed without any studies to directly compare them. This is the first study to compare the two dominant approaches to cognitive remediation (training of executive skills and training of perceptual skills) and employed the broadest assessment battery in the literature to date. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18070849DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Mitigation of Olanzapine-Induced Weight Gain With Samidorphan, an Opioid Antagonist: A Randomized Double-Blind Phase 2 Study in Patients With Schizophrenia.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar 8:appiajp201818030280. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Alkermes, Inc., Waltham, Mass. (Martin, Weiden, Jiang, Pathak, DiPetrillo, Silverman, Ehrich); and Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Hempstead, N.Y., and Zucker Hillside Hospital, Psychiatry, Glen Oaks, N.Y. (Correll).

Objective:: Preclinical evidence and data from a proof-of-concept study in healthy volunteers suggest that samidorphan, an opioid antagonist, mitigates weight gain associated with olanzapine. This study prospectively compared combination therapy of olanzapine plus either samidorphan or placebo for the treatment of schizophrenia.

Methods:: This was an international, multicenter, randomized phase 2 study of olanzapine plus samidorphan in patients with schizophrenia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18030280DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Cariprazine Treatment of Bipolar Depression: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Phase 3 Study.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar 8:appiajp201818070824. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Allergan, Madison, N.J. (Earley, Burgess, Rekeda, Dickinson); Gedeon Richter, Budapest, Hungary (Szatmári, Németh); the Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto (McIntyre); the Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, and the Bipolar Clinic and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (Sachs); and the Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Yatham).

Objective:: Cariprazine, a dopamine D/D and 5-HT receptor partial agonist, was found to be effective in treating bipolar I depression in a previous phase 2 study. This phase 3 study further assessed the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of cariprazine in bipolar I depression.

Methods:: In a double-blind placebo-controlled study, adult participants (18-65 years old) who met DSM-5 criteria for bipolar I disorder and a current depressive episode were randomly assigned to receive placebo (N=158) or cariprazine at 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18070824DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read
12.295 Impact Factor

CORRECTION.

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Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar;176(3):252

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.1763correctionDOI Listing

Caution Against Overinterpreting Opiate Receptor Stimulation as Mediating Antidepressant Effects of Ketamine.

Authors:
Gerard Sanacora

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar;176(3):249

Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, and Yale-New Haven Health System, New Haven, Conn.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18091061DOI Listing

Interpreting Ketamine's Opioid Receptor Dependent Effect: Response to Sanacora.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar;176(3):249-250

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Williams, Blasey, Sudheimer, Rodriguez, Schatzberg) and Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine (Heifets), Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18091061rDOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Interrogating the Genetic Determinants of Tourette's Syndrome and Other Tic Disorders Through Genome-Wide Association Studies.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar;176(3):217-227

The Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Center for Genomic Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (Yu, Illmann, Osiecki, Smoller, Pauls, Neale, Scharf); the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Mass. (Yu, Neale, Scharf); the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (Sul, Huang, Zelaya, Ophoff, Freimer, Coppola); the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles (Sul, Huang, Zelaya, Freimer, Coppola); the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Democritus University of Thrace, Xanthi, Greece (Tsetsos); the Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. (Tsetsos, Paschou); deCODE Genetics/Amgen, Reykjavik, Iceland (Nawaz, H. Stefansson, K. Stefansson); the Bioinformatics Interdepartmental Program, University of California, Los Angeles (Huang, Zelaya); the Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco (Darrow); the Department of Psychiatry, UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco (Hirschtritt, Willsey); the Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (Greenberg, Roffman, Buckner); the Clinic of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry, and Psychotherapy, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany (Muller-Vahl); the Institute of Human Genetics, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany (Stuhrmann); McGill University Health Center, University of Montreal, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal (Dion); the Montreal Neurological Institute, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University, Montreal (Rouleau); the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Aschauer, Stamenkovic); Biopsychosocial Corporation, Vienna (Aschauer, Schlögelhofer); University Health Network, Youthdale Treatment Centres, and University of Toronto, Toronto (Sandor); the Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, Hospital for Sick Children, and University of Toronto, Toronto (Barr); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore (Grados, Singer); the Institute of Human Genetics, University Hospital Bonn, University of Bonn Medical School, Bonn, Germany (Nöthen); the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics, and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany (Hebebrand, Hinney); the Yale Child Study Center and the Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn. (King, Fernandez); the Institute of Medical Chemistry, Molecular Biology, and Pathobiochemistry, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary (Barta); Vadaskert Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Hospital, Budapest, Hungary (Tarnok, Nagy); the Institute of Human Genetics, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany (Depienne); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, UMR S 1127, CNRS UMR 7225, ICM, Paris (Depienne, Worbe, Hartmann); French Reference Centre for Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris (Worbe, Hartmann); Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Department of Neurology, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris (Worbe, Hartmann); Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Hempstead, New York (Budman); Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy (Rizzo); the Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (Lyon); the Department of Psychiatry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (McMahon); Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Mo. (Batterson); the Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Groningen and Rijksuniversity Groningen, and Drenthe Mental Health Center, Groningen, the Netherlands (Cath); the Department of Neurology, Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville (Malaty, Okun); Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey (Berlin); Marquette University and University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee (Woods); Tripler Army Medical Center and University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu (Lee); Parkinson's Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (Jankovic); the Division of Psychiatry, Department of Neuropsychiatry, University College London (Robertson); the Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati (Gilbert); Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia (Brown); the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami (Coffey); the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands (Dietrich, Hoekstra); University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City (Kuperman); the Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle (Zinner); the Department of Pediatrics, Landspitalinn University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland (Luðvigsson, Thorarensen); the Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland (Sæmundsen, Stefansson); the State Diagnostic and Counselling Centre, Kópavogur, Iceland (Sæmundsen); the Department of Genetics and the Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (Atzmon, Barzilai); the Department of Human Biology, Haifa University, Haifa, Israel (Atzmon); the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany (Wagner); the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany (Moessner); SUNY Downstate Medical Center Brooklyn, New York (C.M. Pato, M.T. Pato, Knowles); the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown (Roffman, Buckner); the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston (Smoller); the Center for Brain Science and Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. (Buckner); the Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases, UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco (Willsey); the Department of Genetics and the Human Genetics Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Piscataway (Tischfield, Heiman); the Department of Complex Trait Genetics, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Posthuma); the Division of Genetic Medicine, Vanderbilt Genetics Institute, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn. (Cox, Davis); the Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (Neale); the Department of Psychiatry, Genetics Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville (Mathews); and the Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and the Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (Scharf).

Objective:: Tourette's syndrome is polygenic and highly heritable. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) approaches are useful for interrogating the genetic architecture and determinants of Tourette's syndrome and other tic disorders. The authors conducted a GWAS meta-analysis and probed aggregated Tourette's syndrome polygenic risk to test whether Tourette's and related tic disorders have an underlying shared genetic etiology and whether Tourette's polygenic risk scores correlate with worst-ever tic severity and may represent a potential predictor of disease severity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18070857DOI Listing
March 2019
286 Reads
12.295 Impact Factor

Target Population, Dose, and Timing Considerations for Understanding Naltrexone's Subjective Effect: Response to Amiaz.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar;176(3):251-252

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Williams, Blasey, Sudheimer, Rodriguez, Schatzberg) and Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine (Heifets), Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18111231rDOI Listing

Genetic Markers of ADHD-Related Variations in Intracranial Volume.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar;176(3):228-238

The Department of Human Genetics, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behavior, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands (Klein, Bralten, Roth Mota, Arias-Vasquez, Franke); University Medical Center Utrecht, UMC Utrecht Brain Center, Department of Psychiatry, Utrecht, the Netherlands (Klein); the Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (Walters, Neale); Program in Medical and Population Genetics (Walters) and Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, Mass (Walters, Neale); the Department of Biomedicine and the Center for Integrative Sequencing, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark (Demontis, Mattheisen, Børglum); the Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research (iPSYCH), Denmark (Demontis, Børglum); the Department of Genetics and the Neuroscience Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Stein); the Imaging Genetics Center, USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles (Hibar, Thompson); the Department of Epidemiology and the Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands (Adams); the Department of Psychiatry and the Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto (Schachar); the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London (Sonuga-Barke); the Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany (Mattheisen); the Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatric Research, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Mattheisen); Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm (Mattheisen); the Department of Neurology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles (Thompson); the Quantitative Genetics Laboratory, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia (Medland); the Department of Psychiatry and the Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, N.Y. (Faraone); the K.G. Jebsen Center for Neuropsychiatric Disorders, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway (Faraone); and the Department of Psychiatry, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behavior, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands (Roth Mota, Arias-Vasquez, Franke).

Objective:: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex pathophysiology. Intracranial volume (ICV) and volumes of the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, caudate nucleus, hippocampus, and putamen are smaller in people with ADHD compared with healthy individuals. The authors investigated the overlap between common genetic variation associated with ADHD risk and these brain volume measures to identify underlying biological processes contributing to the disorder. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18020149DOI Listing
March 2019
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Supporting Providers After Drug Overdose Death.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar;176(3):173-178

The Pediatric Psychopharmacology Program, Division of Child Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (Yule); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Division of Substance Abuse, and the Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York (Levin).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18070794DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6436101PMC

Attenuation of Antidepressant Effects of Ketamine by Opioid Receptor Antagonism: Is It a Ketamine-Specific Effect?

Authors:
Revital Amiaz

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar;176(3):250-251

Department of Ambulatory Psychiatry, Sheba Medical Center at Tel Hashomer, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18111231DOI Listing
March 2019
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Translating Developmental Neuroscience to Understand Risk for Psychiatric Disorders.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar;176(3):179-185

The Department of Psychiatry and the Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York.

The transition from childhood to adulthood represents the developmental time frame in which the majority of psychiatric disorders emerge. Recent efforts to identify risk factors mediating the susceptibility to psychopathology have led to a heightened focus on both typical and atypical trajectories of neural circuit maturation. Mounting evidence has highlighted the immense neural plasticity apparent in the developing brain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.19010091DOI Listing
March 2019
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A Contagion Model for Within-Family Transmission of Drug Abuse.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar;176(3):239-248

From the Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, the Department of Psychiatry, and the Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (Kendler); the Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden (Ohlsson, J. Sundquist, K. Sundquist); the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Department of Population Health Science and Policy, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York (J. Sundquist, K. Sundquist); and the Center for Community-Based Healthcare Research and Education, Department of Functional Pathology, School of Medicine, Shimane University, Japan (J. Sundquist, K. Sundquist).

Objective:: The purpose of this study was to determine whether, controlling for genetic effects, drug abuse was transmitted within families as predicted by a contagion model.

Methods:: The authors examined 65,006 parent-offspring, sibling, and cousin pairs ascertained from Swedish population registries in which the primary case subject had a drug abuse registration. The rate of drug abuse registration among at-risk secondary case subjects ages 19-23 was studied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18060637DOI Listing

New Insights Highlighting Neurodevelopmental Issues That Predispose to Childhood and Adolescent Psychopathology.

Authors:
Ned H Kalin

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Mar;176(3):171-172

Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.19010092DOI Listing

A Third Linear Association Between Olduvai (DUF1220) Copy Number and Severity of the Classic Symptoms of Inherited Autism.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Feb 15:appiajp201818080993. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Human Medical Genetics and Genomics Program and Neuroscience Program, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora (Davis, Heft, Sikela); the McLaughlin Centre and the Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, and the Centre for Applied Genomics and Program in Genetics and Genome Biology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Scherer).

Objective:: The authors previously reported that the copy number of sequences encoding an Olduvai protein domain subtype (CON1) shows a linear association with the severity of social deficits and communication impairment in individuals with autism. In this study, using an improved measurement method, the authors replicated this association in an independent population.

Method:: The authors obtained whole genome sequence (WGS) data and phenotype data on 215 individuals from the Autism Speaks MSSNG project. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18080993DOI Listing
February 2019
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Trajectories of Response to Dorsolateral Prefrontal rTMS in Major Depression: A THREE-D Study.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Feb 15:appiajp201818091096. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

The Temerty Centre for Therapeutic Brain Intervention, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto (Kaster, Knyahnytska, Daskalakis, Blumberger); the Department of Psychiatry (Kaster, Downar, Giacobbe, Kennedy, Daskalakis, Blumberger), the Institute of Medical Science (Downar, Giacobbe, Kennedy, Daskalakis, Blumberger), and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health (Thorpe), University of Toronto, Toronto; the MRI-Guided rTMS Clinic, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto (Downar); the Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto (Downar, Kennedy); the Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Vila-Rodriguez, Lam); the Non-Invasive Neurostimulation Therapies Laboratory, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Vila-Rodriguez); the Shalvata Mental Health Center, Hod-Hasharon, Israel, and the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Feffer); the Department of Neuropsychiatry, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo (Noda); the Harquail Centre for Neuromodulation, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Giacobbe); and the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, Saint Michael's Hospital, Toronto (Kennedy).

Objective:: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an effective treatment for refractory major depressive disorder, yet no studies have characterized trajectories of rTMS response. The aim of this study was to characterize response trajectories for patients with major depression undergoing left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex rTMS and to determine associated baseline clinical characteristics.

Methods:: This was a secondary analysis of a randomized noninferiority trial (N=388) comparing conventional 10-Hz rTMS and intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) rTMS. Read More

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http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18091096DOI Listing
February 2019
16 Reads

Benefits of Sequentially Adding Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy or Antidepressant Medication for Adults With Nonremitting Depression.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Apr 15;176(4):275-286. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta (Dunlop, LoParo, Kinkead, Mletzko-Crowe, Mayberg, Craighead); Research Design Associates, Inc., Yorktown Heights, New York (Cole); Institute for Early Life Adversity Research, University of Texas Dell Medical School at Austin (Nemeroff); Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York (Mayberg); Department of Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta (Craighead).

Objective:: Adults with major depressive disorder frequently do not achieve remission with an initial treatment. Addition of psychotherapy for patients who do not achieve remission with antidepressant medication alone can target residual symptoms and protect against recurrence, but the utility of adding antidepressant medication after nonremission with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has received little study. The authors aimed to evaluate the acute and long-term outcomes resulting from both sequences of combination treatments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18091075DOI Listing

Smoking Cannabis and Acquired Impairments in Cognition: Starting Early Seems Like a Really Bad Idea.

Authors:
Philip D Harvey

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Feb;176(2):90-91

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine; and Research Service, Bruce W. Carter Miami VA Medical Center.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18121348DOI Listing
February 2019

Prazosin and Alcohol Use Disorder.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Feb;176(2):165

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. (Kleinman, Ostacher); Department of Psychiatry, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, Calif. (Ostacher).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18101143DOI Listing
February 2019

Prazosin for Alcohol Use Disorder: Response to Kleinman and Ostacher.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Feb;176(2):165-166

Center of Excellence in Substance Abuse Treatment and Education (Simpson, Saxon) and the Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle (Simpson, Raskind); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle (Simpson, Saxon, Raskind).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18101143rDOI Listing
February 2019

Phenotype and Environment Matter: Discovering the Genetic and Epigenetic Architecture of Alcohol Use Disorders.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Feb;176(2):92-95

From the Genetics, Epigenetics, and Developmental Neuroscience Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. (Pollock and Lossie).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18121364DOI Listing
February 2019

New Findings Relevant to Substance Use Disorders.

Authors:
Ned H Kalin

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Feb;176(2):A10

Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18121421DOI Listing
February 2019

Improving Our Understanding of Substance Use Disorders.

Authors:
Kathleen T Brady

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Feb;176(2):87-89

The South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research Institute, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18121391DOI Listing
February 2019
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