588 results match your criteria Am Health Drug Benefits[Journal]


Budget Impact Model of Omadacycline on Replacing a Proportion of Existing Treatment Options Among Patients Who Present to the Emergency Department with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1-Supplement 2):S13-S24

Professor, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, NY.

Background: Omadacycline is an oral and intravenous (IV) once-daily aminomethylcycline antibiotic that is approved in the United States for the treatment of adults with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). It has broad-spectrum activity against common causative pathogens of ABSSSI, including methicillin-resistant . Omadacycline has been shown to be noninferior to linezolid for the treatment of adults with ABSSSI across 2 phase 3 clinical trials. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6442091PMC
February 2019

Budget Impact of Omadacycline for the Treatment of Patients with Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia in the United States from the Hospital Perspective.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1-Supplement 1):S1-S12

Professor, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, NY.

Background: Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) is an acute, lower respiratory bacterial infection. Despite advances in medical care, CABP remains associated with considerable morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs; early empiric treatment is recommended by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and by the American Thoracic Society. Omadacycline is an oral and intravenous (IV) once-daily aminomethylcycline antibiotic that is approved in the United States for the treatment of adult patients with CABP. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6442092PMC
February 2019
1 Read

US Healthcare Trends and Contradictions in 2019.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):40-47

Principal, Institute for Integrated Healthcare, Greenville, SC; Board Chairperson, Employer-Provider Interface, Council of the Hospital Quality Foundation; and Adjunct Professor, Rutgers University, HOPE Center.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404804PMC
February 2019

Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy and the Risk for Depression Among Working-Age Adults with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):30-38

Professor, School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Systems and Policy, West Virginia University.

Background: Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at high risk for depression because of the overall burden of systemic inflammation. Although some evidence suggests that treatment with powerful anti-inflammatory drugs, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, may be effective in reducing the risk for depression in patients with RA, it is unclear whether such reduction in risk is dependent on the response to TNF inhibitor therapy.

Objective: To evaluate the association between the response to TNF inhibitor therapy and the risk for depression among working-age adults with RA. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404801PMC
February 2019
1 Read

The Challenge of Variable Costs in Decisions Based on Cost-Effectiveness Evidence: A Case Study for Brodalumab.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):22-26

Professor of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.

Background: Payers often consider cost-effectiveness studies for new drugs when making decisions on coverage, formulary position, and budgets; however, cost-effectiveness studies are often calculated using estimated pricing before a drug's launch. If the drug's price changes on or after launch, or if rebate programs are initiated, cost-effectiveness studies need to be updated to prevent payers from making decisions using inaccurate value assumptions, which can lead to unexpected financial impacts and potentially delay patient access to drugs.

Objective: To evaluate how lower at-launch drug pricing versus initial estimated pricing affects cost-effectiveness ratios and potentially influences treatment decisions, using the case study of brodalumab, a biologic drug indicated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404800PMC
February 2019

Implementation of a Pharmacist-Led Diabetes Management Protocol.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):14-20

Assistant Director of Ambulatory Clinical Pharmacy Services, Denver Health Medical Center.

Background: Little data exist regarding how pharmacist-led collaborative drug therapy management protocols are implemented in health systems. Barriers to collaborative drug therapy management protocol implementation exist, but they can be overcome by effective protocol education and communication, allowing pharmacists to manage more patients with chronic disease states, thereby enhancing quality health outcomes for patients and reducing health resource utilization.

Objective: To determine the preferred method of provider education regarding the implementation of a pharmacist-led type 2 diabetes collaborative drug therapy management protocol, and to assess pharmacist and provider satisfaction with the protocol implementation. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404803PMC
February 2019

Comparing the Medicaid Prospective Drug Utilization Review Program Cost-Savings Methods Used by State Agencies in 2015 and 2016.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):7-12

Research Assistant, Universidad Icesi, Centro PROESA.

Background: The Medicaid Drug Utilization Review (DUR) program is a 2-phase process conducted by Medicaid state agencies. The first phase is a prospective DUR process and involves electronically monitoring prescription drug claims to identify prescription-related problems, such as therapeutic duplication, contraindications, incorrect dosage, or duration of treatment. The second phase is a retrospective DUR involving ongoing, periodic examinations of claims data to identify patterns of fraud, abuse, underutilization, drug-drug interaction, and medically unnecessary care, and implement corrective actions when needed. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404806PMC
February 2019

A Shift in Party Majority, a Shift in Priority? What the Pharmaceutical Industry Can Expect.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):27-28

Client Solutions Manager, Managed Market Resources.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404802PMC
February 2019

A Global Quest for Reducing Harm in Patient Care.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):5-6

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404805PMC
February 2019
1 Read

A Proposed Intervention to Decrease Resident-Performed Cataract Surgery Cancellation in a Tertiary Eye Care Center.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Dec;11(9):480-487

Attending Surgeon and Director, Cataract and Primary Eye Care Service, Wills Eye Hospital and Professor of Ophthalmology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, TJU.

Background: Cataracts are the leading cause of preventable blindness globally. As a result, competence in cataract surgery is an important component of ophthalmology residency training. Residency programs must optimize the number of cataract surgery cases to train proficient physicians. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322594PMC
December 2018
6 Reads

Pharmacist-Led Drug Therapy Problem Management in an Interprofessional Geriatric Care Continuum: A Subset of the PIVOTS Group.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Dec;11(9):469-478

Clinical Pharmacist, UPMC St. Margaret.

Background: Drug therapy problems, which are adverse events involving medications that can ultimately interfere with a patient's therapeutic goals, occur frequently in older adults. If not identified, resolved, and prevented through clinical decision-making, drug therapy problems may negatively affect patient health outcomes.

Objective: To quantify the impact of pharmacist interventions on the care of older adults by identifying the most common drug therapy problems, the medications most often involved in these problems, and the actions taken by pharmacists to resolve these problems. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322592PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Potential Cost-Savings with Once-Daily Aminomethylcycline Antibiotic versus Vancomycin in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Dec;11(9):449-459

Professor, Albany College of Pharmacy and the Health Sciences, NY.

Background: Omadacycline is an oral and intravenous (IV) once-daily aminomethylcycline antibiotic that was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). In 2 phase 3 clinical trials, IV-to-oral switch and oral-only administration of omadacycline achieved the primary end points of noninferiority compared with linezolid in treating patients with ABSSSI.

Objective: To estimate the potential cost-savings with bioequivalent IV-to-oral antibiotics, such as omadacycline, compared with the standard of care with IV vancomycin by avoiding hospitalizations and reducing hospital stays in patients presenting from the emergency department for ABSSSI treatment. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322591PMC
December 2018
4 Reads

Shut Off the Faucet and Stop Mopping the Floor.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Dec;11(9):447-448

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322593PMC
December 2018

Treatment Tolerability in Patients with Immunoglobulin Light-Chain Amyloidosis.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Nov;11(8):430-437

Principal Consultant & Vice President of Patient Insights, Optum.

Background: Immunoglobulin light-chain amyloidosis (AL amyloidosis) is a rare and often fatal disease for which there is currently no treatment approved by the US Food and Drug Administration or the European Medicines Agency. Treatment options, which are typically based on therapies for multiple myeloma and are used off-label, are associated with substantial adverse events (AEs). Because the severity of AEs is often determined by clinicians, evaluations of treatment tolerability may not fully consider patients' own experience with treatment. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306096PMC
November 2018
9 Reads

Patient Preferences Associated with Therapies for Psoriatic Arthritis: A Conjoint Analysis.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Nov;11(8):408-417

Director of Collaboration Research, Comprehensive Health Insights, Humana.

Background: As psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treatment choices continue to expand, it is important to consider patient preferences for treatment modalities for PsA. Involving patients in treatment decisions can influence adherence to treatment and outcomes of therapy.

Objective: To determine patient preferences for medication attributes prescribed for patients with PsA. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306099PMC
November 2018
3 Reads

Healthcare Costs and Absenteeism Among Caregivers of Adults with Partial-Onset Seizures: Analysis of Claims from an Employer Database.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Nov;11(8):396-403

President, the JeSTARx Group, Dallas, TX.

Background: Partial-onset seizures are the most common type of seizures in patients with epilepsy. In addition to the significant impact on patients, the unpredictability of seizures often also affects family members or caregivers. Caregiver burden in relation to patient treatment may help to guide treatment choices for patients. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306097PMC
November 2018
1 Read

Unscaling Population Health.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Nov;11(8):394-395

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306098PMC
November 2018

Budget Impact Analysis of Using Daunorubicin-Cytarabine Liposome in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Therapy-Related AML or AML and Myelodysplasia-Related Changes.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Oct;11(7):380-386

Director, Health Economics & Outcomes Research, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Palo Alto, CA, during the study.

Background: Current national estimates for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) indicate this disease accounts for 1.1% of new cancer diagnoses and 1.8% of cancer deaths in the United States. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306103PMC
October 2018
3 Reads

Alternative Payment Models in Medical Oncology: Assessing Quality-of-Care Outcomes Under Partial Capitation.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Oct;11(7):371-378

Chief Medical Officer, MCCI Medical Group.

Background: Alternative payment models (APMs) in healthcare are emerging that reward quality of care over quantity of services. Most bundled payment programs that are described in published studies are related to episodes for a surgical inpatient hospital stay. With outpatient services, monthly capitated payments are an alternative to bundled payments for specialty services. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306101PMC
October 2018
1 Read

Computed Tomography Colonography Less Costly Than Colonoscopy for Colorectal Cancer Screening of Commercially Insured Patients.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Oct;11(7):353-361

Chair, Department of Radiology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY.

Background: Computed tomography (CT) colonography's effectiveness, its associated patient advantages, and its potential role to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates have been demonstrated in previous research, but whether CT colonography has a cost advantage relative to optical colonoscopy for the commercially insured US population has not been assessed.

Objective: To compare the costs of CRC screening using CT colonography or optical colonoscopy for commercially insured people in the United States.

Methods: Using retrospective commercial healthcare claims data and peer-reviewed studies, we performed a simulated multiyear, matched-case comparison of the costs of CT and optical colonoscopies for CRC screening. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306102PMC
October 2018

Economic Burden of Adverse Events Associated with Immunotherapy and Targeted Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma in the Elderly.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Oct;11(7):334-343

Medical Director, Novartis Oncology.

Background: Immunotherapies and targeted therapies have drastically improved survival in metastatic melanoma, but they can cause a range of adverse events (AEs). Understanding the costs of these events would facilitate an accurate comparison of melanoma treatments.

Objective: To compare the costs and frequency of AEs associated with immunotherapy and with targeted therapy in elderly patients with metastatic melanoma. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306100PMC
October 2018
8 Reads

"Hoodoo" You Think Will Change?

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Oct;11(7):332-333

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306104PMC
October 2018

Estimating the Real-World Cost of Diabetes Mellitus in the United States During an 8-Year Period Using 2 Cost Methodologies.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Sep;11(6):310-318

Employees of Novo Nordisk at the time of the study.

Background: Diabetes is associated with substantial clinical and economic burdens on patients and on the US healthcare system. Treatment options for patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes have increased significantly, from only 3 drug classes in 1995 to more than 12 distinct classes today. Although several of the newer treatments are reported to have improved efficacy and safety profiles, they are often substantially more costly than older medications. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207315PMC
September 2018
14 Reads

Analysis of Real-World Dosing Patterns for the 3 FDA-Approved Medications in the Treatment of Fibromyalgia.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Sep;11(6):293-301

Principal, IQVIA, during the study.

Background: Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized by widespread pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbances that affects approximately 2% to 4% of the adult population in the United States, with minimal real-world data related to the use of medications and associated dosages for this condition.

Objective: To analyze the real-world dosing patterns of the 3 medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for fibromyalgia-pregabalin, duloxetine, and milnacipran.

Methods: Using QuintilesIMS' (now IQVIA) electronic medical record data linked to administrative claims, we identified adults with fibromyalgia who were newly prescribed pregabalin, duloxetine, or milnacipran between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2014. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207316PMC
September 2018
14 Reads

Trends in Utilization, Spending, and Prices of Smoking-Cessation Medications in Medicaid Programs: 25 Years Empirical Data Analysis, 1991-2015.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Sep;11(6):275-285

Professor, Pharmacy Practice, James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy, University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center, OH.

Background: Smoking remains the single largest preventable cause of death and disease. Smoking-cessation medications provide patients a multitude of benefits and can prevent certain diseases, including some cancers. Because of the limited amount of studies on smoking-cessation medications, we wanted to find general trends about the use of these medications. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207314PMC
September 2018
1 Read

"The Dirty Dozen".

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Sep;11(6):271-272

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207313PMC
September 2018

Budget Impact of Adding Vedolizumab to a Health Plan Formulary as Another First-Line Biologic Option for Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Jul;11(5):253-262

Head of GI Global Outcomes Research, Takeda Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, MA.

Background: Vedolizumab is a biologic drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of adults with moderately to severely active Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) who have had inadequate response to, lost response to, or were intolerant of immunomodulators or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker therapy, or who had an inadequate response with, were intolerant to, or demonstrated dependence on corticosteroid therapy. The biologics approved by the FDA for CD and/or UC include adalimumab, infliximab, golimumab, certolizumab, and ustekinumab.

Objective: To assess the budget impact of including vedolizumab in a health plan formulary among current options as a preferred first-line biologic therapy for UC and CD rather than only for patients who failed anti-TNF therapy. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207303PMC
July 2018
5 Reads

The Prevalence and Payer Costs of Potentially Avoidable Emergent Care Visits for Suspected Amniotic Membrane Rupture in Pregnant Women.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Jul;11(5):241-250

Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, and Director of Women's Health Institute, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

Background: Concern over amniotic fluid leakage is common among pregnant women. Uncertainty about prelabor rupture of amniotic membranes (PROM) can lead women to present to emergency departments or to labor and delivery units for medical evaluation. Many of such visits do not result in delivery, yet they carry significant, and potentially unnecessary, healthcare expenditures. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207302PMC
July 2018
13 Reads

Assessing the Level of Patient-Specific Treatment Recommendations in Clinical Practice Guidelines for Hemodialysis Vascular Access in the United States.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Jul;11(5):223-230

Assistant Professor, Division of Economic, Social, and Administrative Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Florida A&M University Tallahassee.

Background: Hemodialysis is a procedure that requires efficient removal and return of blood to a patient's body. Despite being a life-sustaining process, hemodialysis is associated with morbidity, mortality, and high societal costs. A significant part of the financial costs to patients and society at large can be attributed to vascular access dysfunction. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207304PMC

Namaste.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Jul;11(5):218-220

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207305PMC

Oncology Drugs Approved by the FDA in Early 2018.

Authors:

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Jun;11(4):209-210

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207308PMC

Can Technologic Innovations and Formulary Considerations Improve Healthcare Outcomes?

Authors:
Charles Bankhead

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Jun;11(4):203-208

The following summaries represent a small sample of the many real-world, evidence-based studies presented at the 30th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP), April 23-26, 2018, in Boston, MA. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207307PMC
June 2018
5 Reads

Treatment Persistence and Healthcare Costs Among Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis After a Change in Targeted Therapy.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Jun;11(4):192-202

Director, Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.

Background: Targeted disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) options for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) include tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors (adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab) or alternative mechanisms of action (MOAs), such as a T-cell co-stimulation modulator (abatacept), Janus kinase inhibitor (tofacitinib), or interleukin-6 inhibitor (tocilizumab).

Objective: To examine treatment persistence and healthcare costs in patients with RA who changed therapy by cycling therapy (ie, switching within the same drug class), or switching between, the TNF inhibitors and alternative MOA medication classes.

Methods: We analyzed medical and pharmacy claims for commercially insured patients who cycled or switched between targeted DMARD agents between January 1, 2010, and September 30, 2014 (ie, the index date), to determine treatment patterns (ie, treatment switching, discontinuation, restarting after a gap ≥60 days, or persistence) and costs (plan- and patient-paid) for 1 year postindex. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207310PMC
June 2018
35 Reads

Long-Term Outcomes of a Cardiovascular and Diabetes Risk-Reduction Program Initiated by a Self-Insured Employer.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Jun;11(4):177-183

PharmD candidate, Creighton University School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, Omaha, NE.

Background: Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in America and poses a significant challenge for self-insured employers attempting to improve employee health and well-being while controlling healthcare costs. Disease state management programs can be an effective means of achieving these outcomes, but the durability and long-term effects of such programs have limited evaluation.

Objective: To assess the 5-year health, economic, and quality-of-life patient outcomes of an employer-sponsored disease state management program. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207306PMC
June 2018
7 Reads

Prior Authorization for Elective Diagnostic Catheterization: The Value of Reviewers in Cases with Clinical Ambiguity.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Jun;11(4):168-176

Chief Medical Officer, HealthHelp.

Background: In many situations, evidence-based guidelines cannot provide definitive guidance on the appropriateness of diagnostic catheterization. One specialty benefit management company has taken a 2-step approach to address this ambiguity by evaluating the appropriateness of diagnostic catheterization orders using a rule-based decision support system, and then having reviewers provide input through the consult system of a nondenial prior authorization program that involves peer discussion.

Objective: To describe the outcomes of a 2-step approach to evaluating the appropriateness of elective diagnostic catheterization orders. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207309PMC
June 2018
12 Reads

Can We Make Medicines Affordable?

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Jun;11(4):166-167

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207311PMC

Patient Preferences and Therapeutic Satisfaction with Topical Agents for Rosacea: A Survey-Based Study.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Apr;11(2):97-106

Former Vice President, Analysis Group, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Background: Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that primarily affects the convexities of the central face. Depending on the severity and type of rosacea, physicians may prescribe interventions such as behavioral changes, laser and intense pulsed light, as well as various pharmacologic therapies, including topical agents. The impact of side effects associated with topical treatments for rosacea on patient preferences and treatment satisfaction is not well-documented. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973247PMC
April 2018
5 Reads

Effects of Educational Messaging on Urgent and Emergent Care-Seeking Behaviors Among Publicly Insured Populations.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Apr;11(2):86-94

Lead Medical Director, North Division, Humana.

Background: The impact of messaging campaigns on influencing urgent care- and emergent care-seeking behaviors, including the use of in-network providers, is not well-understood. Although out-of-network healthcare utilization can have negative financial consequences for patients in narrow network Affordable Care Act plans, individuals with time-sensitive medical conditions, and especially patients visiting the emergency department, may not think about out-of-network issues. Inappropriate or avoidable emergency department visits can also create unnecessary costs for patients. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973246PMC
April 2018
7 Reads

Standardized Review and Approval Process for High-Cost Medication Use Promotes Value-Based Care in a Large Academic Medical System.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Apr;11(2):65-73

Professor of Medicine, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine.

Background: As healthcare costs rise and reimbursements decrease, healthcare organization leadership and clinical providers must collaborate to provide high-value healthcare. Medications are a key driver of the increasing cost of healthcare, largely as a result of the proliferation of expensive specialty drugs, including biologic agents. Such medications contribute significantly to the inpatient diagnosis-related group payment system, often with minimal or unproved benefit over less-expensive therapies. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973244PMC

Delayed Treatment Acceleration in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Who Have Inadequate Response to Initial Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors: Data from the Corrona Registry.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 May;11(3):148-158

Senior Director, North America Medical Affairs, and Medical Lead, Specialty Payer & Channel Customer Strategy, Pfizer, Collegeville, PA.

Background: The implementation of treat-to-target principles in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not been fully investigated in patients with inadequate response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor treatment.

Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of an inadequate response to initial TNF inhibitor treatment at 6 and 12 months among patients with RA in a real-world patient registry, as well as the delay in therapy adjustment and its impact on disease activity and patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures.

Methods: This analysis is based on data of patients with moderate or severe disease activity (Clinical Disease Activity Index [CDAI] score >10) who were included in the Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America (Corrona) RA registry, a prospective, observational database. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973251PMC
May 2018
5 Reads

Changes in Medical Services and Drug Utilization and Associated Costs After Narcolepsy Diagnosis in the United States.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 May;11(3):137-145

Senior Fellow, Sleep and CNS Medicine, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, and Adjunct Professor, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA.

Background: Healthcare utilization and the cost implications associated with undiagnosed and/or misdiagnosed narcolepsy have not been evaluated, and there is scant literature characterizing the newly diagnosed population with narcolepsy with respect to treatment patterns and resource utilization.

Objective: To analyze the changes in medication use, healthcare utilization, and the associated costs after a new diagnosis of narcolepsy.

Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, we used data from the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Research Databases, between January 2006 and March 2013, to identify patients who had a probable new diagnosis of narcolepsy-defined as a de novo medical claim for a multiple sleep latency test-which was preceded by ≥6 months of continuous insurance and was followed by a de novo diagnosis of narcolepsy. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973250PMC
May 2018
24 Reads

Comparing Treatment Modalities for End-Stage Renal Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 May;11(3):118-127

Associate Professor, Division of Economic Social and Administrative Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee.

Background: End-stage renal disease (ESRD) imposes significant economic and social burdens on patients and healthcare systems. In the United States alone, more than 600,000 Americans have ESRD, with an estimated annual cost of treatment of more than $30 billion. Peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis are competing renal replacement therapies in ESRD; however, data comparing quality-of-life outcomes between these 2 modalities are limited. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973249PMC

Is Adequate Nutrition Cost-Effective?

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 May;11(3):115-116

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973248PMC
May 2018
2 Reads

New Rivals: Integrating Health Benefits to Provide Comprehensive Patient Care.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Apr;11(2):83-85

Senior Client Consultant, Managed Market Resources.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973245PMC

20% by 2020.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Apr;11(2):63-64

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973243PMC
April 2018
5 Reads

Healthcare Trends for 2018.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Feb;11(1):48-54

President, Access Market Intelligence, Trumbull, CT, and Founding Partner, National Institute of Collaborative Healthcare.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5902765PMC
February 2018

Temporal Trends in Survival and Healthcare Costs in Patients with Multiple Myeloma in the United States.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Feb;11(1):39-46

Truven Health Analytics, and received research funding from Janssen for this study.

Background: In recent years, the development of new therapies for multiple myeloma has improved the survival of patients, but newer treatments may also affect healthcare costs. To date, no real-world study has examined the concurrent changes in survival and total healthcare costs over time in patients with multiple myeloma.

Objective: To examine the temporal changes in survival and healthcare costs among patients with multiple myeloma in the United States. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5902764PMC
February 2018
4 Reads

Newly Diagnosed Hepatitis C in the US Commercially Insured Population Before and After the 2012 Implementation of Expanded Screening Guidelines.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Feb;11(1):30-37

Associate Director, Global HCV, Health Economics & Outcomes Research, AbbVie, Mettawa, IL.

Background: In the United States in 2014, more than 3 million individuals were estimated to have chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including many undiagnosed individuals. In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expanded its HCV testing recommendations to target all adults born between 1945 and 1965, in addition to at-risk individuals, which has led to an increase in newly diagnosed patients. Few studies have explored the medical cost or clinical status of patients who are newly diagnosed with HCV. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5902763PMC
February 2018
6 Reads

Predictors of Transitioning to Incident Chronic Opioid Therapy Among Working-Age Adults in the United States.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Feb;11(1):12-21

Professor, School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Systems and Policy, West Virginia University.

Background: Opioids have been prescribed and used for chronic noncancer pain at prolific rates in the United States during the past 2 decades. Patients who transition to incident chronic opioid therapy are at increased risk for significant negative health consequences, including cardiovascular risk, endocrine disorders, opioid use disorder, and death.

Objective: To identify the leading predictors associated with transitioning to incident chronic opioid therapy among working-age adults without cancer. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5902762PMC
February 2018
4 Reads