629 results match your criteria Am Health Drug Benefits[Journal]


Medication Use Before and After Hospitalization for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in a Cohort of Elderly Patients with a Medicare Advantage Plan.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2020 Feb;13(1):32-42

Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Health Outcomes and Policy, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston.

Background: Several medications, including long-acting bronchodilators (LABDs), are critical to the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Clinical guidelines recommend the initiation of an LABD for COPD posthospitalization to prevent exacerbations. COPD can limit a patient's exercise tolerance, mobility, and ability to work. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7040953PMC
February 2020

Association Between Formulary Coverage and Use of Abuse-Deterrent Prescription Opioids, Risk for Abuse or Overdose, and Associated Healthcare Resource Utilization.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2020 Feb;13(1):21-31

CEO, Enlightenment Bioconsult, Wethersfield, CT.

Background: Significant public health concerns exist regarding the misuse and abuse of prescription opioids. Abuse-deterrent formulation (ADF) opioids may be leveraged as an important tool for combating the current opioid crisis.

Objectives: To evaluate the relationships between ADF opioid formulary coverage and the ADF utilization rate, the risk for opioid abuse or overdose, opioid abuse or overdose-related healthcare resource utilization, and medical costs within a calendar year. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7040955PMC
February 2020

Corporate Culture of Health: Elusive and Expensive.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2020 Feb;13(1):10-111

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean Emeritus, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7040954PMC
February 2020

FDA Oncology Update.

Authors:

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Nov;12(7):365-366

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6996617PMC
November 2019

The Economic Implications of Hyperkalemia in a Medicaid Managed Care Population.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Nov;12(7):352-361

President and Chief Executive Officer, Intelligent Health Analytics.

Background: Hyperkalemia, defined as a serum potassium level >5 mEq/L that results from multiple mechanisms, is a serious medical condition that can lead to life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The coexistence of cardiac and renal diseases (ie, cardiorenal syndrome) significantly increases the complexity of care, but its economic impact is not well-characterized in this understudied Medicaid managed care population with hyperkalemia.

Objective: To calculate the economic impact of hyperkalemia on patients with cardiorenal syndrome in a Medicaid managed care population in the United States using real-world data. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6996620PMC
November 2019

Key Trends in Healthcare for 2020 and Beyond.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Nov;12(7):348-350

President, Access Market Intelligence, LLC, Trumbull, CT.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6996619PMC
November 2019

Realized and Projected Cost-Savings from the Introduction of Generic Imatinib Through Formulary Management in Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Nov;12(7):333-342

Group Director, Worldwide Health Economics and Outcomes Research Communications Lead, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.

Background: Imatinib, a first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), and the newer second-generation TKIs have dramatically improved outcomes for patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). A previous model estimated the potential cost-savings over the next 2 years after the loss of patent exclusivity for imatinib in the United States in 2016 and its availability in a generic form. Payers have indeed realized meaningful savings, but it took 2 years for the prices of generic imatinib to decline substantially. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6996618PMC
November 2019

Predicting Success in Population Health.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Nov;12(7):323-324

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean Emeritus, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6996616PMC
November 2019

Real-World Dose Modification Patterns of Subcutaneous Tocilizumab Among Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Dec;12(8):400-409

Professor and Vice-Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Nashville, TN.

Background: The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is based on the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Tocilizumab can be used as monotherapy or in combination with conventional synthetic DMARDs for the treatment of moderate-to-severe active rheumatoid arthritis. Subcutaneous (SC) and intravenous forms of the drug are available, but the SC form is more widely used. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6986546PMC
December 2019

Outcomes-Based Contracting for Disease-Modifying Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis: Necessary Conditions for Paradigm Adoption.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Dec;12(8):390-398

Founder, JTKENNEY, Waltham, MA, and former Manager, Specialty and Pharmacy Contracts, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care.

Background: In therapeutic areas with uncertainty regarding clinical outcomes that are dependent on high-cost specialty medications, outcomes-based contracts can be a tool to reduce financial risk for payers and for drug manufacturers. With a high treatment cost, large number of therapy choices, and variability of responses to therapy across patients, multiple sclerosis is a compelling therapeutic area to support outcomes-based contracts.

Objective: To identify the necessary conditions to support the widespread adoption of outcomes-based contracts for high-cost drug therapy, with a focus on disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6986548PMC
December 2019

The Business Case for Social Determinants.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Dec;12(8):387-388

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean Emeritus, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6986547PMC
December 2019

Clinical and Budget Impact of Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening by Blood- and Stool-Based Testing.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Sep;12(5):256-262

Director and Full Member, Division of Public Health Sciences and Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Background: Screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) is effective at reducing mortality, but nearly 35% of eligible patients do not get screened. New noninvasive screening methods may help increase CRC screening participation. Current CRC screening methods include blood-based screening with methylated Septin 9 () DNA (Epi proColon), stool-based screening with fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), and the multianalyte fecal test combining FIT and stool DNA (Cologuard). Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6979046PMC
September 2019

The Challenge of High Drug Prices in America: Cost Disclosure in Direct-to-Consumer Advertising May Offer a Solution.

Authors:
Kamille Garness

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Sep;12(5):254-255

Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6979044PMC
September 2019

Don't Give Up on Biosimilars-Congress Can Give Them a Boost: Drugs grown in live cells are hard to replicate. But policy changes can help accelerate the process.

Authors:
Scott Gottlieb

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Sep;12(5):252-253

Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, 2017-2019. He is an investor in and director of drugmakers.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6979050PMC
September 2019

Evolution of the Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management Program from Inception in 2006 to the Present.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Sep;12(5):243-251

Professor of Pharmacy Practice and Science, and Executive Director, Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy.

Background: In 2006, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) implemented the newly established Medicare Part D program that required plan sponsors to offer a medication therapy management (MTM) program. The MTM program requirements have become more prescriptive over the past decade in the attempt to address low beneficiary enrollment rates, improve the quality of services provided, and address gaps in meeting the needs of enrollees.

Objective: To describe changes to the requirements for the Medicare Part D MTM program since its inception in 2006 and the impact of these changes to inform future program enhancements. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6979045PMC
September 2019

Value-Based Agreements in Healthcare: Willingness versus Ability.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Sep;12(5):232-234

Client Solutions Manager, Managed Market Resources.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6979047PMC
September 2019

Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors and Joint Pain: A Retrospective Cohort Study of Older Veterans with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Sep;12(5):223-231

Professorm Department of Pharmaceutical Systems and Policy, West Virginia University School of Pharmacy, Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center [North], Morgantown.

Background: In recent years, dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors have been added to the diabetes treatment algorithm. Few published studies have shown that the use of DPP-4 inhibitors is associated with joint pain. To our knowledge, no population-based studies in the United States have studied this association. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6979048PMC
September 2019

The Healthcare Start-Up Nation.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Sep;12(5):221-222

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean Emeritus, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6979049PMC
September 2019

Costs and Healthcare Resource Utilization Associated with Hospital Admissions of Patients with Metastatic or Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Oct;12(6):306-312

Director, US Medical Affairs, Bayer HealthCare, Whippany, NJ.

Background: Limited published information exists that compares the costs of metastatic prostate cancer with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Although most research has focused on the costs of metastatic prostate cancer, delaying metastases in patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer can reduce or delay healthcare resource utilization and any associated expenditures.

Objective: To compare the costs and healthcare resource utilization of patients with metastatic or nonmetastatic prostate cancer who were receiving care in an inpatient or an outpatient hospital setting. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6922323PMC
October 2019

Differences in Patient Demographics and Healthcare Costs of Patients with PIDD Receiving Intravenous or Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin Therapies in the United States.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Oct;12(6):294-304

Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

Background: Primary immune-deficiency disease (PIDD) is a rare, debilitating disease of the immune system that predisposes the affected individual to infection, autoimmune conditions, and neoplasm. A major component of the cost of treating PIDD is the high price of immunoglobulin drugs, which can be administered via an intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) route.

Objective: To compare real-world costs for patients with PIDD who are receiving IV immunoglobulin (IVIG) or SC immunoglobulin (SCIG) treatment, from a US payer perspective, using a large claims database. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6922325PMC
October 2019

Employer-Sponsored Wellness Programs for Hypertension and Dyslipidemia in a 2-Hospital Health System.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Oct;12(6):287-293

Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Ambulatory Care, St Joseph's/Candler Health System, and Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Georgia College of Pharmacy.

Background: The increasing prevalence of chronic disease states, such as hypertension and dyslipidemia, in the United States has placed a growing economic burden on the nation's healthcare system, and incentives for cost reductions have been used by various private health insurers.

Objective: To analyze the clinical outcomes of pharmacy department-managed, employer-sponsored wellness programs for dyslipidemia and hypertension in a 2-hospital health system.

Methods: Using a retrospective chart review, we evaluated outcomes of employees and their spouses who were enrolled in our dyslipidemia and hypertension Wellpath programs between November 2015 and April 2017. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6922324PMC
October 2019

Accountability Is Everything: Outcomes-Based Pharmaceutical Agreements.

Authors:
Javier González

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Oct;12(6):277-278

Chief Operating Officer, Abarca Health Duluth, GA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6922326PMC
October 2019

No Outcome, No Income.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Oct;12(6):274-275

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean Emeritus, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6922322PMC
October 2019

Group-Based Trajectory Models to Identify Sociodemographic and Clinical Predictors of Adherence Patterns to Statin Therapy Among Older Adults.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Jun-Jul;12(4):202-211

Associate Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Health Outcomes and Policy, University of Houston College of Pharmacy.

Background: The benefits of statins in the prevention of primary and secondary atherosclerotic cardiovascular (CV) disease events have been well documented. Suboptimal adherence is a persistent problem associated with increased CV events and increased healthcare utilization. Proportion of days covered (PDC) is widely used to measure medication adherence, and provides a single value that does not adequately depict different adherence behavior patterns. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6684050PMC
August 2019
1 Read

FDA Oncology Update.

Authors:

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Jun-Jul;12(4):198-200

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6684051PMC

Charlson Comorbidity Index: Update and Translation.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Jun-Jul;12(4):188-197

Associate Vice President, Population Health Strategy, Bold Goal, Office of the Chief Medical Officer, all at Humana Inc., Louisville, KY.

Background: The original Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) encompassed 19 categories of medical conditions that were identifiable in medical records. Subsequent publications provided scoring algorithms based on () codes. The recent adoption of () codes in the United States created a need for a new scoring scheme. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6684052PMC
August 2019
1 Read

Will We Ever Bend the Cost Curve in Healthcare?

Authors:
Ehsan U Syed

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Jun-Jul;12(4):186-187

Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Penn State University College of Medicine, and Medical Director, Child and Adolescent Service Line, Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute, Hershey, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6684049PMC

Cost-Saving Opportunities with an Oral and Intravenous Once-Daily Aminomethylcycline Antibiotic for Hospitalized Patients with Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia: Findings from Decision-Analytic Models.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Jun-Jul;12(4):168-176

Director, Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Paratek Pharmaceuticals, King of Prussia, PA.

Background: The most frequently prescribed regimens for the treatment of hospitalized adults with suspected or documented community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), an acute bacterial infection of the pulmonary parenchyma, are ceftriaxone plus a macrolide, or a respiratory fluoroquinolone. Although these regimens are consistent with expert guidelines, there are growing concerns regarding their safety and efficacy. Omadacycline is a once-daily antibiotic with oral and intravenous (IV) formulations; it was recently approved in the United States for the treatment of adults with CABP. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6684047PMC
August 2019
3 Reads

Final Commencement Address.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Jun-Jul;12(4):166-167

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean Emeritus, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6684048PMC

Prevalence and Economic Burden of Epilepsy in the Institutionalized Medicare Fee-for-Service Population.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 May;12(3):151-158

Vice President and Head of Global HEOR and Market Access, Sunovion, Marlborough, MA.

Background: Based on data from 2003 to 2007, the prevalence of epilepsy was significantly higher in the institutionalized elderly population than in the noninstitutionalized population, but the recent prevalence and economic impact of epilepsy specifically in the institutionalized Medicare population have not been reported.

Objectives: To estimate the prevalence and economic burden of epilepsy and inpatient utilization rates among institutionalized Medicare beneficiaries and to provide a 10-year projection of their population size and the associated costs.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the institutionalized Medicare population with and without epilepsy using Medicare 5% sample claims data from 2013 and 2014. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6611517PMC

Real-World Treatment Patterns in Patients with Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer and Bone Metastases.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 May;12(3):142-149

Director of Oncology, US Medical Affairs, Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals.

Background: Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men in the United States. There is scant real-world evidence characterizing the care utilization and clinical outcomes associated with the use of therapies currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

Objective: To describe the real-world treatment patterns, healthcare costs, and survival rates of patients with metastatic CRPC and bone metastases who have commercial or Medicare coverage. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6611520PMC
May 2019
1 Read

Treatment Patterns and Costs of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: A Claims Database Analysis.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 May;12(3):127-135

Manager, Scientific Consulting, Xcenda.

Background: Corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) have been standard-of-care treatments for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) for more than 2 decades. Despite guideline recommendations for best clinical practices, heterogeneity in patient presentation and the course of treatment for CIDP remains. There is limited literature regarding the real-world treatment patterns of and costs associated with CIDP. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6611518PMC
May 2019
2 Reads

Lexicon Limbo: From "Healthspan" to "New Normal" and "Discharge".

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 May;12(3):116-117

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6611519PMC

Can Academic Detailing Move the Needle for Patients with Diabetes in a State-Based Prescription Drug Benefit Program?

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Apr;12(2):94-102

Senior Health Outcomes Scientist, Magellan Rx Management/PACE, Harrisburg, PA.

Background: Publicly funded prescription drug programs, such as state pharmacy assistance programs, provide critical benefits for the care of individuals, but they are frequently limited in their resources to optimize patient outcomes. The application of quality metrics to prescription drug claims may help to determine whether prescribers' adherence to national standards can be augmented through academic detailing.

Objective: To evaluate changes in diabetes drug prescribing patterns after an academic detailing educational intervention in 2013 and 2014 for prescribers in the Pennsylvania Pharmaceutical Assistance Contract for the Elderly (PACE) program. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6485651PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

The Challenge of Managing Atopic Dermatitis in the United States.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Apr;12(2):83-93

Director of US Medical Affairs, Pfizer, Collegeville, PA.

Background: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects up to 13% of children and 10% of adults in the United States. Among patients and their families, atopic dermatitis has a considerable effect on quality of life and represents a substantial economic burden.

Objective: To describe the impact and challenges of atopic dermatitis and to provide nondermatologists in the healthcare community an enhanced understanding of atopic dermatitis to facilitate treatment and pharmacy benefit discussions. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6485648PMC
April 2019
15 Reads

The Economic Value of Customized versus Off-the-Shelf Knee Implants in Medicare Fee-for-Service Beneficiaries.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Apr;12(2):66-73

Baker Tilly, New York, NY, during this study.

Background: The amount of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedures performed in the United States has been increasing steadily and is projected to reach 3 million procedures annually by 2030 in patients aged ≥65 years. A rise in TKA procedures will increase spending on osteoarthritis treatments, which is currently the second highest category of spending for Medicare patients. Because TKA procedures account for a substantial amount of total osteoarthritis spending, payers and providers are examining methods to reduce spending on the procedure while improving clinical outcomes. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6485650PMC
April 2019
3 Reads

Pharmacy Integration.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Apr;12(2):64-65

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6485649PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

Budget Impact Model of Omadacycline on Replacing a Proportion of Existing Treatment Options Among Patients Who Present to the Emergency Department with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1-Supplement 2):S13-S24

Professor, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, NY.

Background: Omadacycline is an oral and intravenous (IV) once-daily aminomethylcycline antibiotic that is approved in the United States for the treatment of adults with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). It has broad-spectrum activity against common causative pathogens of ABSSSI, including methicillin-resistant . Omadacycline has been shown to be noninferior to linezolid for the treatment of adults with ABSSSI across 2 phase 3 clinical trials. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6442091PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Budget Impact of Omadacycline for the Treatment of Patients with Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia in the United States from the Hospital Perspective.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1-Supplement 1):S1-S12

Professor, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, NY.

Background: Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) is an acute, lower respiratory bacterial infection. Despite advances in medical care, CABP remains associated with considerable morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs; early empiric treatment is recommended by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and by the American Thoracic Society. Omadacycline is an oral and intravenous (IV) once-daily aminomethylcycline antibiotic that is approved in the United States for the treatment of adult patients with CABP. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6442092PMC
February 2019
40 Reads

US Healthcare Trends and Contradictions in 2019.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):40-47

Principal, Institute for Integrated Healthcare, Greenville, SC; Board Chairperson, Employer-Provider Interface, Council of the Hospital Quality Foundation; and Adjunct Professor, Rutgers University, HOPE Center.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404804PMC
February 2019
3 Reads

Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy and the Risk for Depression Among Working-Age Adults with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):30-38

Professor, School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Systems and Policy, West Virginia University.

Background: Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at high risk for depression because of the overall burden of systemic inflammation. Although some evidence suggests that treatment with powerful anti-inflammatory drugs, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, may be effective in reducing the risk for depression in patients with RA, it is unclear whether such reduction in risk is dependent on the response to TNF inhibitor therapy.

Objective: To evaluate the association between the response to TNF inhibitor therapy and the risk for depression among working-age adults with RA. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404801PMC
February 2019
3 Reads

The Challenge of Variable Costs in Decisions Based on Cost-Effectiveness Evidence: A Case Study for Brodalumab.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):22-26

Professor of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.

Background: Payers often consider cost-effectiveness studies for new drugs when making decisions on coverage, formulary position, and budgets; however, cost-effectiveness studies are often calculated using estimated pricing before a drug's launch. If the drug's price changes on or after launch, or if rebate programs are initiated, cost-effectiveness studies need to be updated to prevent payers from making decisions using inaccurate value assumptions, which can lead to unexpected financial impacts and potentially delay patient access to drugs.

Objective: To evaluate how lower at-launch drug pricing versus initial estimated pricing affects cost-effectiveness ratios and potentially influences treatment decisions, using the case study of brodalumab, a biologic drug indicated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404800PMC
February 2019
10 Reads

Implementation of a Pharmacist-Led Diabetes Management Protocol.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):14-20

Assistant Director of Ambulatory Clinical Pharmacy Services, Denver Health Medical Center.

Background: Little data exist regarding how pharmacist-led collaborative drug therapy management protocols are implemented in health systems. Barriers to collaborative drug therapy management protocol implementation exist, but they can be overcome by effective protocol education and communication, allowing pharmacists to manage more patients with chronic disease states, thereby enhancing quality health outcomes for patients and reducing health resource utilization.

Objective: To determine the preferred method of provider education regarding the implementation of a pharmacist-led type 2 diabetes collaborative drug therapy management protocol, and to assess pharmacist and provider satisfaction with the protocol implementation. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404803PMC
February 2019
5 Reads

Comparing the Medicaid Prospective Drug Utilization Review Program Cost-Savings Methods Used by State Agencies in 2015 and 2016.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):7-12

Research Assistant, Universidad Icesi, Centro PROESA.

Background: The Medicaid Drug Utilization Review (DUR) program is a 2-phase process conducted by Medicaid state agencies. The first phase is a prospective DUR process and involves electronically monitoring prescription drug claims to identify prescription-related problems, such as therapeutic duplication, contraindications, incorrect dosage, or duration of treatment. The second phase is a retrospective DUR involving ongoing, periodic examinations of claims data to identify patterns of fraud, abuse, underutilization, drug-drug interaction, and medically unnecessary care, and implement corrective actions when needed. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404806PMC
February 2019
3 Reads

A Shift in Party Majority, a Shift in Priority? What the Pharmaceutical Industry Can Expect.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):27-28

Client Solutions Manager, Managed Market Resources.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404802PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

A Global Quest for Reducing Harm in Patient Care.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2019 Feb;12(1):5-6

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404805PMC
February 2019
7 Reads

A Proposed Intervention to Decrease Resident-Performed Cataract Surgery Cancellation in a Tertiary Eye Care Center.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Dec;11(9):480-487

Attending Surgeon and Director, Cataract and Primary Eye Care Service, Wills Eye Hospital and Professor of Ophthalmology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, TJU.

Background: Cataracts are the leading cause of preventable blindness globally. As a result, competence in cataract surgery is an important component of ophthalmology residency training. Residency programs must optimize the number of cataract surgery cases to train proficient physicians. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322594PMC
December 2018
17 Reads

Pharmacist-Led Drug Therapy Problem Management in an Interprofessional Geriatric Care Continuum: A Subset of the PIVOTS Group.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Dec;11(9):469-478

Clinical Pharmacist, UPMC St. Margaret.

Background: Drug therapy problems, which are adverse events involving medications that can ultimately interfere with a patient's therapeutic goals, occur frequently in older adults. If not identified, resolved, and prevented through clinical decision-making, drug therapy problems may negatively affect patient health outcomes.

Objective: To quantify the impact of pharmacist interventions on the care of older adults by identifying the most common drug therapy problems, the medications most often involved in these problems, and the actions taken by pharmacists to resolve these problems. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322592PMC
December 2018
3 Reads

Potential Cost-Savings with Once-Daily Aminomethylcycline Antibiotic versus Vancomycin in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections.

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Dec;11(9):449-459

Professor, Albany College of Pharmacy and the Health Sciences, NY.

Background: Omadacycline is an oral and intravenous (IV) once-daily aminomethylcycline antibiotic that was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). In 2 phase 3 clinical trials, IV-to-oral switch and oral-only administration of omadacycline achieved the primary end points of noninferiority compared with linezolid in treating patients with ABSSSI.

Objective: To estimate the potential cost-savings with bioequivalent IV-to-oral antibiotics, such as omadacycline, compared with the standard of care with IV vancomycin by avoiding hospitalizations and reducing hospital stays in patients presenting from the emergency department for ABSSSI treatment. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322591PMC
December 2018
13 Reads

Shut Off the Faucet and Stop Mopping the Floor.

Authors:
David B Nash

Am Health Drug Benefits 2018 Dec;11(9):447-448

Editor-in-Chief, American Health & Drug Benefits Founding Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322593PMC
December 2018
2 Reads