24 results match your criteria Allograft Reconstruction ACL-Deficient Knee

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Synthetic grafts in the treatment of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament of the knee joint.

Polim Med 2017 Jan-Jun;47(1):55-59

Division of Sports Medicine, Wroclaw Medical University, Wrocław, Poland.

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is cited as the most frequently injured ligament in the knee. The standard treatment of ACL injury remains ligament reconstruction followed by a postoperative physiotherapeutic procedure. During the reconstruction, the torn ligament can be replaced with an autograft or an allograft. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.17219/pim/76819DOI Listing
April 2018
3 Reads

Concomitant Arthroscopic Meniscal Allograft Transplantation and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

Arthrosc Tech 2016 Oct 11;5(5):e1161-e1171. Epub 2016 Oct 11.

Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

In recent decades, arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) has been refined as a robust option for the treatment of evolving unicompartmental tibiofemoral arthrosis in the setting of meniscal deficiency. It is imperative that the MAT be performed in a knee with anatomic stability and alignment to reduce aberrant biomechanical forces experienced by the allograft tissue to maintain its durability. Thus, in an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knee, ACL reconstruction (ACLR) must be performed to restore the stable knee environment for the MAT to succeed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eats.2016.07.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5310194PMC
October 2016
3 Reads

Autograft Versus Allograft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Prospective, Randomized Clinical Study With a Minimum 10-Year Follow-up.

Am J Sports Med 2015 Oct 26;43(10):2501-9. Epub 2015 Aug 26.

Sports Medicine Section, Orthopaedic Surgery Service, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.

Background: The use of allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in young athletes is controversial. No long-term results have been published comparing tibialis posterior allografts to hamstring autografts.

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term results of primary ACL reconstruction using either an allograft or autograft. Read More

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http://ajs.sagepub.com/content/43/10/2501.full.pdf
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http://ajs.sagepub.com/lookup/doi/10.1177/0363546515596406
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546515596406DOI Listing
October 2015
23 Reads
14 Citations
4.362 Impact Factor

Effect of ACL graft material on joint forces during a simulated in vivo motion in the porcine knee: examining force during the initial cycles.

J Orthop Res 2014 Nov 6;32(11):1458-63. Epub 2014 Aug 6.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California Los Angles, Los Angeles, CA.

This study compared three-dimensional forces in knees containing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft materials versus the native porcine ACL. A six-degree-of-freedom (DOF) robot simulated gait while recording the joint forces and moments. Knees were subjected to 10 cycles of simulated gait in intact, ACL-deficient, and ACL-reconstructed knee states to examine time zero biomechanical performance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jor.22704DOI Listing
November 2014
4 Reads

Reliability of a semi-automated 3D-CT measuring method for tunnel diameters after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A comparison between soft-tissue single-bundle allograft vs. autograft.

Knee 2014 Oct 20;21(5):926-31. Epub 2014 May 20.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Monica Hospitals, Antwerp, Belgium; Department of Physiotherapy and Orthopedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ghent University, Belgium.

Background: Post-operative widening of tibial and/or femoral bone tunnels is a common observation after ACL reconstruction, especially with soft-tissue grafts. There are no studies comparing tunnel widening in hamstring autografts versus tibialis anterior allografts. The goal of this study was to observe the difference in tunnel widening after the use of allograft vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.knee.2014.05.003DOI Listing
October 2014
4 Reads

Outcome of anatomic transphyseal anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in Tanner stage 1 and 2 patients with open physes.

Am J Sports Med 2012 May 5;40(5):1093-8. Epub 2012 Mar 5.

North Sydney Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Centre, Wollstonecraft, Australia.

Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are being seen with increasing frequency in children. Treatment of the ACL-deficient knee in skeletally immature patients is controversial.

Purpose: To determine the outcome of all-arthroscopic transphyseal anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction in Tanner stage 1 and 2 patients at a minimum of 2 years after surgery. Read More

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http://ajs.sagepub.com/content/early/2012/03/02/036354651243
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http://ajs.sagepub.com/lookup/doi/10.1177/0363546512438508
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546512438508DOI Listing
May 2012
9 Reads

Allograft anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: indications, techniques, and outcomes.

J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2012 Mar 25;42(3):196-207. Epub 2012 Jan 25.

UPMC Center for Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is an important stabilizer of the knee against translational and rotational forces. The goal of anatomic reconstruction of the ACL-deficient knee is to re-create a stable knee that will allow for return to sport and prevent recurrent injury. Multiple graft options exist for ACL reconstruction, and each option has unique advantages and disadvantages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2519/jospt.2012.4083DOI Listing
March 2012
7 Reads

Lyophilised medial meniscus transplantations in ACL-deficient knees: a 19-year follow-up.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2012 Jan 26;20(1):109-13. Epub 2011 May 26.

Department of Orthopaedic and Traumatology, Medicine School of Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: The treatment of meniscal tears has changed since the early 1980s. Meniscus transplantation emerged as a treatment option during that period. This study aims to present the long-term results of the first lyophilised meniscus allograft transplants in Turkey. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00167-011-1556-3
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-011-1556-3DOI Listing
January 2012
3 Reads

Three-dimensional in vivo patellofemoral kinematics and contact area of anterior cruciate ligament-deficient and -reconstructed subjects using magnetic resonance imaging.

Arthroscopy 2009 Nov;25(11):1214-23

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test whether (1) the 3-dimensional in vivo patellofemoral kinematics and patellofemoral contact area of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees are different from those of normal, contralateral knees and (2) ACL reconstruction restores in vivo patellofemoral kinematics and contact area.

Methods: Ten ACL-deficient knees and twelve ACL-reconstructed knees, as well as the contralateral uninjured knees, were tested. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at full extension and 40 degrees of flexion under simulated partial weight-bearing conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2009.05.013DOI Listing
November 2009
3 Reads

Double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using two different suspensory femoral fixation: a technical note.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2007 Aug 12;15(8):1023-7. Epub 2007 May 12.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Korea University Ansan Hospital, 516 Gozan-dong, Danwon-gu, Ansan, 425-707, South Korea.

We describe a novel double-bundle reconstruction method for ACL deficient knee. Grafts are tibialis allograft for AMB (anteromedial bundle) and semitendinosus autograft for PLB (posterolateral bundle). Femoral fixations are done by Bio-TransFix for AMB and EndoButton for PLB. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-007-0336-6DOI Listing
August 2007
7 Reads

Single femoral socket double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using tibialis anterior tendon: description of a new technique.

Arthroscopy 2005 Oct;21(10):1273

Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA.

The native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has been shown to consist of 2 functional bundles with independent behavior throughout range of knee motion. Conventional arthroscopic ACL reconstruction techniques selectively recreate the anteromedial bundle of the native ACL only. Numerous studies have reported the failure to restore normal knee kinematics in an ACL-deficient knee using a single-bundle reconstruction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2005.07.015DOI Listing
October 2005
2 Reads

Reverse achilles tendon allograft technique for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

Arthroscopy 2005 Jun;21(6):769

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California 90509, USA.

Because of the increasing popularity of allograft anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions, the technical difficulties with posterior bone loss in revision ACL surgery, and the limited supply of bone-patellar tendon-bone donor grafts, we have developed a technique using a reversed Achilles tendon allograft to reconstruct the ACL-deficient knee. This technique allows for bony tibial fixation with an interference screw by rotating the graft 180 degrees and optimizing soft-tissue fixation at the femur with an EndoButton CL (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA). Short-term follow-up (average, 26. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2005.03.031DOI Listing
June 2005
6 Reads

Arthroscopically assisted meniscal allograft transplantation with and without combined anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2003 May 9;11(3):173-82. Epub 2003 May 9.

Holy Cross Hospital Medical Group, 6000 N. Federal Highway, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33308, USA.

The menisci provide a vital role in load transmission across the knee joint as well as contribute to knee stability, particularly in the ACL-deficient knee. Loss of the meniscus, in part or in total, significantly alters joint function and predisposes the articular cartilage to degenerative changes, which has been well documented both clinically and radiographically. This study examined clinical and patient-reported outcomes following meniscal allograft transplantation with and without combined ACL reconstruction in a select group of 31 patients with complaints of pain and/or instability (34 meniscal allografts); 11 underwent isolated meniscal transplantation and 20 meniscal transplantation combined with ACL reconstruction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-003-0362-yDOI Listing
May 2003
21 Reads

Scientific justification and technique for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using autogenous and allogeneic soft-tissue grafts.

Orthop Clin North Am 2003 Jan;34(1):19-30

Uniformed Services, University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA.

The DLSTG is the strongest and stiffest autogenous graft source available for reconstruction of the torn anterior cruciate ligament. Harvest morbidity is low compared with other autogenous graft sources, such as the patellar bone-tendon-bone graft. Soft-tissue allografts provide an excellent alternative for patients requiring revision surgery or for patients who want to avoid any morbidity associated with autogenous graft harvest. Read More

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January 2003
1 Read

Allograft anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients over 40 years of age.

Arthroscopy 2002 Oct;18(8):845-53

Kruger Orthopedic Clinic and Surgery Center, Ed-monds, Washington, USA.

Purpose: The study goal was to determine the results of allograft anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in patients over 40 years old at a minimum of 24 months follow-up (mean, 59.7 months; range, 24 to 110 months).

Type Of Study: Retrospective review. Read More

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October 2002
3 Reads

Survival analysis of human meniscal transplantations.

J Bone Joint Surg Br 2002 Mar;84(2):227-31

Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

We describe a prospective survival analysis of 63 consecutive meniscal allografts transplanted into 57 patients. The lateral meniscus was transplanted in 34, the medial meniscus in 17, and both menisci (combined) in the same knee in six. For survival analysis we used persistent pain or mechanical damage as clinical criteria of failure. Read More

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March 2002
2 Reads

Development of a synovial cyst following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

Arthroscopy 2001 Feb;17(2):200-2

Department of Orthopaedics, Geisinger Medical Center, Geisinger Health Systems, Danville, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

The use of bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft or autograft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is an accepted method of repair of the ACL-deficient knee with few complications. We report an unusual complication associated with this technique, the development of synovial fistula and cyst associated with the use of nonabsorbable suture material. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/jars.2001.8019DOI Listing
February 2001
1 Read

The ligament augmentation device: an historical perspective.

Authors:
K Kumar N Maffulli

Arthroscopy 1999 May;15(4):422-32

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Aberdeen Medical School, Foresterhill, Scotland.

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is the most common ligament injury in the knee, and a significant number of patients may develop progressive instability and disability despite aggressive rehabilitation. Various materials have been used for its reconstruction. These include autografts, allografts, prosthetic ligaments, and synthetic augmentation of the biological tissue. Read More

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May 1999
6 Reads

An unusual intrinsic complication of a patellar tendon allograft and recommendations for tissue banking.

Arthroscopy 1995 Aug;11(4):475-7

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60612, USA.

Complications of patellar-tendon allograft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in ACL-deficient patients have focused on disease transmission, strength, survivorship, technique, and processing to decrease antigenicity. Little has been described in regard to intrinsic complications of patellar-tendon allograft. This article discusses our experience with a damaged patellar-tendon allograft that was abnormally long and had a large osseous intratendinous mass. Read More

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August 1995
3 Reads

Meniscus Tears: Treatment in the Stable and Unstable Knee.

Authors:
Belzer Cannon

J Am Acad Orthop Surg 1993 Oct;1(1):41-47

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco.

Basic science research and follow-up studies after meniscectomy have provided convincing evidence of the importance of preservation of the meniscus in decreasing the risk of late degenerative changes. Whether in a stable or an unstable knee, if a meniscus tear cannot be repaired, a conservative partial meniscectomy should be undertaken to preserve as much meniscal tissue as possible. When feasible, repair should be carried out in young patients with an isolated meniscus tear, despite healing rates that are significantly lower than those obtained when meniscus repair is done with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Read More

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October 1993
2 Reads

The meniscus in the cruciate-deficient knee.

Authors:
W O Thompson F H Fu

Clin Sports Med 1993 Oct;12(4):771-96

Musculoskeletal Research Center, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pennsylvania.

Evidence clearly implicates meniscectomy as a primary factor in the premature development of OA of the knee joint. Although data demonstrate the ability of the menisci to transmit load, they do not contribute to the primary stability of the knee. In the absence of the ACL, the menisci have been shown to enhance the knee's stability in the AP, varus-valgus, and internal-external directions in vitro. Read More

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October 1993
23 Reads

Prosthetic versus tendon allograft replacement of ACL-deficient knees.

Acta Orthop Belg 1991 ;57 Suppl 2:67-74

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Ghent State University Hospital, Belgium.

ACL reconstruction is still controversial. Between November 1985 and October 1987, 57 ACL reconstructions were performed using a Dacron graft. Evaluation was done using the Lysholm rating system and Tegner scale. Read More

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March 1992
1 Read

Clinical comparison of freeze-dried and fresh frozen patellar tendon allografts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee.

Am J Sports Med 1990 Jul-Aug;18(4):335-42

Department of Orthopaedics, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville 32610.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of freeze-dried compared to fresh frozen allograft tissue used as a substitute for a ruptured ACL of the knee. In addition, the incidence of any graft rejection phenomena was recorded. Forty-one patients with ACL deficient knees underwent reconstructive surgery using a patellar bone-tendon-bone allograft that had been freeze-dried (Group 1, N = 14) or fresh frozen (Group 2, N = 27). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/036354659001800401DOI Listing
October 1990
1 Read

Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using allograft tendon.

Arthroscopy 1988 ;4(3):199-205

Department of Surgery, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest University Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27103.

Treatment of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knee using an arthroscopic technique and freeze-dried allograft tendons in 23 patients was studied prospectively. Accurate placement of drill holes and anchoring positions for the allografts was effected through a standard arthroscopic approach combined with a 3 cm incision on the medial tibial flare. Candidates for reconstruction were those who were unable to tolerate brace therapy and who had no degenerative arthritis. Read More

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November 1988
1 Read
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