2,082 results match your criteria Allergy and Asthma Proceedings[Journal]


A cross-sectional study of the prevalence of food allergies among children younger than ages 14 years in a Beijing urban region.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2019 Jan;40(1):e1-e7

From the Center for Asthma Prevention and Education, Capital Institute of Pediatrics, Beijing, China.

The prevalence of food allergies has increased over the past several decades, but little is known about this issue in Beijing. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of food allergies in the Beijing urban area and to summarize the clinical features and common food allergens in children <14 years of age. We conducted a cross-sectional study of children ages 0-14 years who were recruited from 10 kindergartens and 20 primary and middle schools in two communities in the central region (Xicheng district). Read More

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https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4193DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads

For the Patient.

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Allergy Asthma Proc 2019 Jan;40(1):70

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4197DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Pearls and pitfalls of food challenges in infants.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2019 Jan;40(1):62-69

An oral food challenge (OFC) is considered the diagnostic criterion standard procedure for evaluation of a suspected food allergy in patients of any age. This can be accomplished as either an open or a blinded challenge. In recent years, the open OFC has become an acceptable and practical office-based practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4187DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Direct oral amoxicillin challenge without preliminary skin testing in adult patients with allergy and at low risk with reported penicillin allergy.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2019 Jan;40(1):57-61

Department of Internal Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Ten percent of hospitalized patients report penicillin allergy; however, recent studies indicate that ∼98% of these patients are not acutely hypersensitive. Unconfirmed penicillin allergy poses public health risks, and an evaluation of penicillin allergy labels is recommended to improve antibiotic stewardship. Although the most widely accepted protocol is penicillin skin testing, followed by oral amoxicillin challenge, time constraints and resources may preclude this. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4184DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads

A cross-sectional, population-based survey of U.S. adults with symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2019 Jan;40(1):48-56

OptiNose US, Inc., Yardley, Pennsylvania.

Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is believed to create a substantial population-level disease burden in the United States due to its high prevalence and significant disease morbidity, but many studies of CRS epidemiology are based on administrative or historical record sources rather than primary population sources. To characterize CRS symptoms, burden, and patient characteristics by using a primary U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4182DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Anaphylaxis risk factors for hospitalization and intensive care: A comparison between adults and children in an upstate New York emergency department.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2019 Jan;40(1):41-47

From the Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Albany Medical College School of Medicine, Albany, New York.

Anaphylaxis is an acute, systemic allergic reaction that can be life threatening, and with an increasing incidence and costs associated with hospitalization and intensive care. To assess the risk factors for hospitalization by comparing pediatric and adult patients. We performed a retrospective chart review for patients with anaphylactic reactions who presented to the Albany Medical Center emergency department between 2005 and 2012. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4189DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6313254PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Systemic reaction rates with omalizumab, subcutaneous immunotherapy, and combination therapy in children with allergic asthma.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2019 Jan;40(1):35-40

For children with moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma, omalizumab is effective. However, it is expensive, and there are no current guidelines for discontinuation. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) is the only approach that can provide persistent beneficial effects after treatment is discontinued. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4173DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Effect of inhaled corticosteroids on serum periostin levels in adult patients with mild-moderate asthma.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2019 Jan;40(1):32-34

From the Department of Pharmacology, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Shrimati Sucheta Kriplani Hospital, New Delhi, India.

Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein, and its expression is upregulated in airway epithelial cells in patients with bronchial asthma. Periostin may be a key molecule linked to type 2 T-helper cell inflammation. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) may suppress periostin-induced asthmatic inflammation. Read More

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https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4179DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Clinical burden of asynchrony in patients with asthma when using metered-dose inhalers for control.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2019 Jan;40(1):21-31

Analysis Group, Inc., Boston, Massachusetts.

Asynchrony, or lack of coordination between inhalation and actuation when using a pressurized metered-dose inhaler (MDI), could theoretically impact the delivery of inhaled medications and treatment efficacy. To assess the real-world association between asynchrony and clinical outcomes among patients with asthma who receive controller therapy delivered by MDIs. A cohort of patients was assembled via electronic health records. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4192DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Update on peanut allergy: Prevention and immunotherapy.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2019 Jan;40(1):14-20

The prevalence of food allergy is steadily increasing, and the burden of food allergy has become significant. However, treatments for food allergy remain experimental. To review advances in the past 18 months for the prevention and treatment of food allergies, with a particular focus on peanut allergy. Read More

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https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4190DOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

New and evolving therapies for hereditary angioedema.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2019 Jan;40(1):7-13

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare, autosomal dominant, genetic disorder associated with a deficiency in C1 inhibitor protein. HAE is characterized by recurrent and unpredictable episodes of swelling of the extremities, abdomen, face, and upper airway. There are several newly approved drugs as well as investigational products that are currently under study for the management of patients with HAE, with the potential to optimize care and improve quality of life for patients with HAE. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4195DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Clinical updates in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

Authors:
Tanya M Laidlaw

Allergy Asthma Proc 2019 Jan;40(1):4-6

Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), a syndrome that includes asthma, recurrent nasal polyps, and pathognomonic reactions to aspirin and other nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitors, is still not fully understood and lacks specific disease-modifying therapeutic options. To review the most recent clinical updates in the evaluation and treatment of patients with AERD. Recent clinical research studies relevant to patients with AERD were reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4188DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6313255PMC
January 2019
6 Reads

Scoring systems for allergies and asthma in clinical research and practice.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Dec 18. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

Background: Scoring systems are increasingly being developed for various diseases, including asthma and allergic disorders, with the objective of improving the classification of disease severity and the assessment of efficacy of therapeuticmodalities.

Objective: This review provided concise summaries of published scoring systems used for allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopicdermatitis, urticaria, Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis, eosinophilic esophagitis, and systemic allergicreactions (anaphylaxis).

Methods: We searched the medical literature between 1985 and 2018 for published scoring systems that have been developedand used in clinical trials or in practice for assessment of asthma and a variety of allergic disorders. Read More

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https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2019.40.4196DOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads

A cross-sectional, population-based survey of U.S. adults with symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov 14. Epub 2018 Nov 14.

Background: Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is believed to create a substantial population-level disease burden in the UnitedStates due to its high prevalence and significant disease morbidity, but many studies of CRS epidemiology are based onadministrative or historical record sources rather than primary population sources.

Objective: To characterize CRS symptoms, burden, and patient characteristics by using a primary U.S. Read More

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https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4182DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

Effect of indoor air quality on the natural history of asthma in an urban population in Poland.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov;39(6):e64-e70

From the Department of Prevention of Environmental Hazards and Allergology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Pol.

Indoor air pollution may have an impact on asthma. To evaluate the influence of indoor air pollution on the natural history of asthma. Data collection by using the European Community Respiratory Health Survey and International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood standardized questionnaire (N = 18,617) and medical examinations (N = 4783) in selected Polish regions was used. Read More

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2018.39.41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4176DOI Listing
November 2018
21 Reads

Extrinsic warming of low-osmolality iodinated contrast media to 37°C reduced the rate of allergic-like reaction.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov;39(6):e55-e63

From the Department of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital/Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong, P.R. China.

Although there is good evidence that warming of contrast media changes the bolus kinetics and injection pressure of iodinated contrast media, there has been little evidence that it affects clinical adverse event rates in a meaningful way. To determine whether the extrinsic warming of low-osmolality iodinated contrast media to 37°C reduced adverse reactions. Data on adverse reactions were collected from two cohorts, one of which used contrast media at room temperature and the other in which contrast media were warmed to 37°C before administration. Read More

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2018.39.41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4160DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6212634PMC
November 2018
15 Reads

Early risk factors for cow's milk allergy in children in the first year of life.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov;39(6):e44-e54

Department of Paediatrics, Allergology and Gastroenterology, Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University of Torun, Poland, Bydgoszcz.

Cow's milk allergy (CMA) is a key form of food allergy (FA). It was shown that the frequency of FA seems to have increased during the past 10-20 years, which led to the thought that FA may have different risk factors. Epigenetic regulations and environmental pre- and postnatal factors play a large role in contributing to allergy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4159DOI Listing
November 2018
15 Reads

Effect of indoor air quality on the development of rhinitis in an urban population in Poland.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 11;39(6):e71-e77

Background: Indoor air significantly impacts the incidence of rhinitis among residents of urban agglomerations. Objective: To assess the impact of indoor air pollution on rhinitis. Methods: Data were collected by using an European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) and International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) standardized questionnaires (N = 18,617), and medical examinations were carried out (N = 4783) in selected Polish regions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4177DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

For the Patient.

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Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov;39(6):472

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4186DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Generalized rash and pruritus in a 58-year-old woman.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov;39(6):468-471

From the Section of Allergy and Immunology, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

Although allergists often evaluate rashes associated with allergic, IgE mediated etiologies, it is important to consider a wide range of differential diagnoses that includes inflammatory, infectious, and autoimmune etiologies. The case of a 58-year-old woman with a 1-year history of progressive pruritic rash that did not improve with topical creams and steroids is presented. The patient did not state any other symptoms, and a physical examination was notable for a widespread rash. Read More

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2018.39.41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4181DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

Pearls and pitfalls in the diagnosis of cough variant asthma.

Authors:
William M Corrao

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov;39(6):466-467

Cough alone may sometimes be the sole presenting symptom of asthma. Patients experience cough without wheeze or shortness of breath and with normal baseline pulmonary function test results. These patients do, however, demonstrate bronchial hyperreactivity. Read More

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2018.39.41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4168DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

Correlation of negative skin-prick test results for tree nuts and successful tree nut challenges among children with peanut allergy.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov;39(6):456-460

The Translational Pulmonary and Immunology Research Center, Long Beach, California.

Children with peanut allergy are regularly instructed to avoid all tree nuts. However, children with peanut allergy are likely not allergic to all tree nuts. In our cohort of patients with peanut anaphylaxis and who underwent oral immunotherapy, we sought to determine the correlation of skin-prick testing (SPT) results for tree nuts and the likelihood of successfully passing a tree nut challenge. Read More

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2018.39.41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4174DOI Listing
November 2018
10 Reads

Challenges in managing patients referred for eosinophilic esophagitis: A telephone survey and retrospective review.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov;39(6):449-455

Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) in patients referred to allergists can be difficult to manage. This is due to multiple factors, including overlaps in presentation with gastroesophageal reflux disease and proton-pump inhibitor responsive eosinophilia, remaining uncertainties regarding the role of different forms of allergy testing, and a variety of patient adherence issues. To highlight, in an objectively studied fashion, complications that can be faced when managing patients referred for EoE. Read More

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2018.39.41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4163DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

Assessment of atopic dermatitis as a risk factor for chronic spontaneous urticaria in a pediatric population.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov;39(6):445-448

From the Allergy Department, 2nd Pediatric Clinic, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

Atopic dermatitis (AD) and chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) represent two of the most common chronic inflammatory pruritic skin diseases. Any relationship between atopic skin disorders and CSU is controversial, mostly due to the paucity of relevant epidemiologic and pathogenetic data. To evaluate whether a history of AD in early childhood represents a risk factor for the subsequent occurrence of CSU in a pediatric population. Read More

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2018.39.41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4166DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

The effect of preoperative penicillin allergy testing on perioperative non-beta-lactam antibiotic use: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov;39(6):420-429

From Education Division, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Lebanon, New Hampshire.

The majority of patients for elective surgery and with a history of penicillin allergy are placed on alternative prophylactic antibiotic therapies, which have been associated with the emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens and increased morbidity and mortality rates. However, self-reporting of penicillin allergy alone may overestimate the prevalence of penicillin allergy in the population. To assess the effects of preoperative antibiotic allergy testing protocols in reducing the use of non-beta-lactam antibiotics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4178DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

Severe atopic dermatitis: Therapeutic update.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov;39(6):411-419

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disorder with a multitude of highly characterized comorbidities that affect infants, children, and adults worldwide. Despite its high prevalence and health burden, our armamentarium to treat AD in its severe form has remained lacking. For decades, the only Food and Drug Administration approved systemic treatment options for AD had been limited to corticosteroids. Read More

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2018.39.41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4172DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

The burden of atopic dermatitis.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov;39(6):406-410

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a dermatologic condition that affects a large percentage of children and adults in the United States. The disease process is not fully understood, and, currently, there is no cure, so today's treatment methodologies focus on the rash and the symptoms, , pruritus. Even though there is no mortality with this condition, there is significant morbidity and burden. Read More

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2018.39.41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4175DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

Impact of patient satisfaction with his or her inhaler on adherence and asthma control.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov 18;39(6):437-444. Epub 2018 Oct 18.

Servicio de Neumología y Alergia, Hospital Clínic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas en Red de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Barcelona, Spain.

Asthma guidelines recommend considering patient preferences for inhaler choice. However, few studies have assessed the impact of patient satisfaction with an inhaler on adherence and health outcomes. To assess the impact of patient satisfaction with an inhaler on adherence and health outcomes in asthma. Read More

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2018.39.41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4183DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6212632PMC
November 2018
18 Reads

Cross-sectional study on Asthma Insights and Management in the Gulf and Russia.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov 16;39(6):430-436. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Real-World & Analytics Solutions, IQVIA, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Asthma is a chronic and complex lung disease that is not completely understood. It involves airway inflammation, reversible airflow obstruction, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. The most common symptoms are recurrent wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, and coughing. Read More

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2018.39.41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4180DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6212633PMC
November 2018
10 Reads

Human factors engineering validation study for a novel 0.1-mg epinephrine auto-injector.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Nov 29;39(6):461-465. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

Core Human Factors, Inc., Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania.

Anaphylaxis in infants and young children is increasing. Historically, epinephrine auto-injectors (EAI) were not available in a dose or platform designed for patients who weighed <15 kg, and, therefore, 0.15-mg EAIs were prescribed for these patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4171DOI Listing
November 2018
5 Reads

Abstracts from the Eastern Allergy Conference, May 31-June 3, 2018, Palm Beach, Florida.

Authors:

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 09;39(5):399-401

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/108854118823980329DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

For the Patient.

Authors:

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 09;39(5):398

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2013.39.41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2013.39.4170DOI Listing
September 2018
4 Reads

A 45-year-old man with elevated levels of immunoglobulin A.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Sep;39(5):394-397

From the Department of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Southern California Permanente Medical Group, Los Angeles, California.

Quantitative immunoglobulin tests are often ordered as part of the initial evaluation for suspected immune deficiency. Although alterations in immunoglobulin levels can explain recurrent infections, in a patient without symptoms, there are a variety of other factors that can alter immunoglobulin levels. Common causes for elevated immunoglobulin A levels include malignancy and hepatic impairment in addition to a variety of infiltrative, infectious, and inflammatory diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4161DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Human factors study of a newly approved prefilled syringe of epinephrine for the treatment of anaphylaxis.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Sep;39(5):389-393

Background: Epinephrine remains the treatment of choice for acute anaphylaxis. However, currently available autoinjectors are costly, and studies have demonstrated human factor issues that result in incorrect use as well as device failures.

Objective: A recent U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4154DOI Listing
September 2018
27 Reads

Camel's milk allergy.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Sep;39(5):384-388

Departments of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Cerrahpaşa Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Introduction: Camel's milk is a safe and therapeutic nutrient. Camel's milk allergy is almost unknown.

Objective: To identify the clinical and laboratory features of camel's milk allergy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4150DOI Listing
September 2018
3 Reads

Improved diagnostic clarity in shrimp allergic non-dust-mite sensitized patients.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Sep;39(5):377-383

From the Section of Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

Background: Allergen specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) levels predictive of shrimp allergy have not been identified, but these may be helpful in identifying patients at risk for shrimp-induced allergic reactions.

Objective: This study sought to identify component resolved diagnostic tests useful for diagnosis of shrimp allergy in patients with or without house-dust mite (HDM) sensitization to the major allergen cysteine protease (Der p 1).

Methods: Patients with positive skin-prick test (SPT) results and/or sIgE values were recruited. Read More

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.2500/aap.2018.39.41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4148DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6122289PMC
September 2018
7 Reads

Factors that predict disease severity in atopic dermatitis: The role of serum basal tryptase.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Sep;39(5):371-376

Division of Pediatric Allergy, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Background: Increased numbers of mast cells that contain tryptase are found in lesional atopic dermatitis (AD) skin. The association of serum basal tryptase (sBT) with anaphylactic reactions and mast cell diseases has recently been shown in children with venom and food allergy.

Objective: We aimed to identify the risk factors that predict the severity of AD and the association of sBT levels with AD and disease severity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4158DOI Listing
September 2018
3 Reads

Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials for the efficacy and safety of anti-interleukin-13 therapy with lebrikizumab in patients with uncontrolled asthma.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Sep;39(5):332-337

Background: Several studies have evaluated the efficacy and safety of lebrikizumab treatment with uncontrolled asthma. However, most of these studies were small and conclusions were inconsistent. Furthermore, whether serum periostin can act as a good predictor of the response to lebrikizumab treatment is still not certain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4149DOI Listing
September 2018
7 Reads

Physician-diagnosed eczema is an independent risk factor for incident mouse skin test sensitization in adults.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Jul;39(4):311-315

From the Division of Pediatric Allergy/Immunology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryl.

Background: The disrupted skin barrier in eczema has been associated with an increased risk of immunoglobulin E (IgE) sensitization in childhood. However, it is unclear whether eczema, independent of atopy, is a risk factor for the development of allergic sensitization in adulthood.

Objective: To determine if skin barrier dysfunction, independent of atopy, is a risk factor for incident sensitization in adult workers at a mouse production and research facility. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4137DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6052172PMC
July 2018
18 Reads

Subcutaneous C1-esterase inhibitor to prevent hereditary angioedema attacks: Safety findings from the COMPACT trial.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Sep 14;39(5):365-370. Epub 2018 Aug 14.

CSL Behring, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.

Background: The first subcutaneous (SC) C1-esterase inhibitor concentrate (C1-INH) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in June 2017 as routine prophylaxis to prevent hereditary angioedema attacks in adolescents and adults at a dose of 60 IU/kg twice weekly based on the phase III Clinical Study for Optimal Management of Preventing Angioedema With Low-volume Subcutaneous C1-Inhibitor Replacement Therapy (COMPACT) trial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4164DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads

Cost impact of monitoring exhaled nitric oxide in asthma management.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Sep 13;39(5):338-344. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

Global Medical Affairs, Circassia Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Morrisville, North Carolina.

Background: Asthma guidelines recommend periodic assessment of impairment and risk factors to prevent exacerbations, which can lead to hospitalization and increased health care utilization and cost. According to recent meta-analysis data, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) monitoring is associated with a 40-50% reduction in the risk of exacerbations.

Objective: Cost modeling of these data indicates the potential for significant cost savings with FeNO use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4165DOI Listing
September 2018
3 Reads

Erratum.

Authors:

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 07;39(4):e43

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4152DOI Listing
July 2018
4 Reads

Feasibility of structured light plethysmography for the evaluation of lung function in preschool children with asthma.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Jul;39(4):e38-e42

Background: Structured light plethysmography (SLP) is a new noninvasive technology to capture the movement of the thoracic and abdominal wall, and to assess some parameters indicative for lung function.

Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of SLP in children with asthma.

Methods: A total of 52 patients were enrolled: 25 with asthma exacerbation (group 1), 13 with well-controlled asthma (group 2), and 14 healthy controls (group 3). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4143DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

Differences in cytokine levels between the nasal polyps of adolescents with local allergic and adolescents with allergic or nonallergic rhinitis.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Jul;39(4):e30-e37

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, Hanyang University Seoul, Korea.

Background: Local allergic rhinitis (LAR) is rhinitis with a localized nasal allergic response in the absence of systemic allergy. This study aimed to evaluate the pathogenesis specific to LAR compared with allergic rhinitis (AR) and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) by using cytokines from polypous tissues.

Methods: We recruited 43 patients with AR (n = 15; mean age, 17. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4135DOI Listing
July 2018
11 Reads

For the Patient.

Authors:

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Jul;39(4):326

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4153DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

A 69-year-old woman with periodic fever, facial swelling, and neck pain.

Allergy Asthma Proc 2018 Jul;39(4):322-325

We presented a case of a 69-year-old woman who experienced monthly episodes of facial swelling and nonpruritic, erythematous rash on her face, accompanied by high fever, nausea, headache, and neck pain over 1 year. Her symptoms started with myalgia, arthralgia, fever and neck stiffness, and headache, and then angioedema occurred, which was painful to touch. She underwent multiple iatrogenic diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that did not lead to the correct diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4139DOI Listing
July 2018
5 Reads