526 results match your criteria Ajidd-american Journal On Intellectual And Developmental Disabilities[Journal]


The Influence of Residence Type on Personal Outcomes.

Authors:
Carli Friedman

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Apr;57(2):112-126

Carli Friedman, The Council on Quality and Leadership.

Over the last 5 decades, the state institution census has decreased 85% in the United States. Despite these radical shifts away from institutionalization, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) continue to struggle to be meaningfully included in the community. For these reasons, the aim of this study was to explore if and how residence type affects attainment of quality of life outcomes of people with IDD in the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.2.112DOI Listing

Adaptive Behavior and Intelligence in Adolescents With Down Syndrome: An Exploratory Investigation.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Apr;57(2):79-94

Camila Sabat, School of Psychology, Universidad de los Andes, Santiago, Chile; Marc Tassé, Nisonger Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; and Marcela Tenorio, School of Psychology, Universidad de los Andes, Santiago, Chile.

Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by difficulties in both intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior. These sets of abilities are considered as separate but related domains with small to moderate correlations. The main objective of this study was to explore the relationship of intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior in adolescents with DS because previous studies have shown different relationship patterns between these constructs across other syndromes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.2.79DOI Listing

Resúmenes al Español.

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Apr;57(2):174-175

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.2.174DOI Listing

Résumés en Français.

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Apr;57(2):172-173

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Effects of School-Home Communication With Parent-Implemented Reinforcement on Off-Task Behavior for Students With ASD.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Apr;57(2):95-111

Samantha E. Goldman, Assumption College; and Kelli A. Sanderson, Blair P. Lloyd, and Erin E. Barton, Vanderbilt University, Peabody College.

School-home communication is highly valued for parents of students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other developmental disabilities. However, parents report poor communication as a common barrier to developing partnerships with schools. Using a multiple baseline design, we evaluated the effects of a school-home note intervention with parent-implemented reinforcement for decreasing off-task behavior of students with ASD at school. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.2.95DOI Listing
April 2019
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Predictors of Emergency Room and Hospital Utilization Among Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD).

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Apr;57(2):127-145

Meghan G. Blaskowitz, Duquesne University, Department of Occupational Therapy; Brigida Hernandez, YAI Network; and Paul W. Scott, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Health and Community Systems.

Emergency room (ER) and hospital utilization among people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are significant contributors to rising healthcare costs. This study identifies predictors of utilization among 597 adults with IDD. Using a retrospective survey of medical charts, descriptive statistics and logistic regressions were conducted. Read More

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http://www.aaiddjournals.org/doi/10.1352/1934-9556-57.2.127
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.2.127DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Fiscal Stewardship, Choice, and Control: The Context of Self-Directed Services for People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) in the United States.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Apr;57(2):158-171

Matthew D. Bogenschutz, Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Social Work; Matthew DeCarlo, Radford University, School of Social Work; Jennifer Hall-Lande and Amy Hewitt, University of Minnesota, Institute on Community Integration.

Self-directed home and community based services (HCBS) waiver services and supports for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) have become a viable and widely used method of service provision in the United States. Grounded in theories of self-determination, previous literature on self-direction has suggested high satisfaction and positive outcomes for people who use self-directed programs as well as cost savings for state IDD service systems. This study explored the ways in which state IDD service administrators think about how self-direction may be used as a method of achieving cost savings while providing opportunities for people with IDD and their families to exercise choice and control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.2.158DOI Listing

Understanding the Systems, Contexts, Behaviors, and Strategies of Parents Advocating for Their Children With Down Syndrome.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 Apr;57(2):146-157

Kristen Krueger, Kansas State University; Jessica D. Cless, Washburn University; and Meghan Dyster, Mollie Reves, Robert Steele, and Briana S. Nelson Goff, Kansas State University.

In the current qualitative research study, we focused on understanding the ecological systems, contexts, behaviors, and strategies of parents ( N = 435) advocating for their children with an intellectual and developmental disability diagnosis, specifically Down syndrome (DS). Based on the data analysis, parents of children with DS advocate for their children frequently, in a variety of settings, with different actions, attitudes, motivations, and outcomes. The most common settings where advocacy occurred were primarily school and healthcare systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.2.146DOI Listing
April 2019
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Supporting Families Through the Charting the LifeCourse Framework.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 02;57(1):56-65

George S. Gotto and Michelle C. Reynolds, University of Missouri at Kansas City - Institute for Human Development; Susan B. Palmer, Beach Center on Disability, KUCDD; and Danielle F. Chiang , University of Missouri at Kansas City - Institute for Human Development.

Supporting families who have family members with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) as they move through life is a critical need ( Reynolds, Palmer, & Gotto, 2018 ). The phrase, supporting families, juxtaposes the typical family support paradigm in response to the ongoing shrinkage of federal and state dollars and the recognition that parents and caregivers need services and supports to support their family member with IDD at home ( Amado, Stancliffe, McCarron, & McCallion, 2013 ). Within the family support movement, families are defined in the broadest terms, including those living in the same household, people who are affiliated by birth or choice, and others in the role of helping individuals with IDD succeed in life ( Reynolds et al. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.1.56DOI Listing
February 2019
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In Their Own Words: Perceptions and Experiences of Bullying Among Individuals With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 02;57(1):66-74

Megan M. Griffin, Whitworth University; Marisa H. Fisher, Michigan State University; Laurel A. Lane, University of New Mexico; and Lindsay Morin, Michigan State University.

Despite the high incidence of bullying among people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), little research has been conducted with people with IDD as participants reporting their own perceptions and experiences of bullying. To address this shortcoming, we interviewed 18 adults with IDD regarding these issues. Four major themes emerged from our qualitative analysis of the transcribed interviews: (a) bullying is hurtful, (b) why people bully, (c) bullying takes many forms, and (d) bullying can happen anywhere. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.1.66DOI Listing
February 2019

An Algorithmic Approach to Nutritional Difficulties in People With Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 02;57(1):14-25

Suma Chennubhotla and Rebecca Hertog, University of Louisville; John E. Williams, University of South Carolina School of Medicine-Greenville, Department of Developmental Pediatrics; Debra Hanna, Memphis, TN; and Thomas L. Abell, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Louisville.

With the increasing survival rate of people with developmental disabilities into adulthood and later life, nutritional support and feeding of these individuals frequently becomes a critical problem which must be addressed by their caregivers and healthcare providers. Problems surrounding mealtimes include difficulty with the mechanisms of feeding as well as medical complications including aspiration and gastrointestinal dysmotility. No comprehensive guidelines exist to aid caregivers and healthcare providers regarding the issues in feeding and nutrition in this population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.1.14DOI Listing
February 2019
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Service-Learning and Students With Severe Disabilities: Examining Participation and Curricular Goals.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 02;57(1):42-55

Michelle L. Bonati, State University of New York at Plattsburgh; and Stacy K. Dymond, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

The purpose of this case study was to examine how students with severe disabilities participated in service-learning at a food pantry and the curricular goals they addressed. Service-learning is a form of experiential learning that blends classroom instruction with community service. Participants included 3 high school students with severe disabilities enrolled in a private faith-based school, 5 school staff, and the food pantry coordinator. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.1.42DOI Listing
February 2019

State Utilization of Direct Support Professionals in Medicaid HCBS Waivers.

Authors:
Carli Friedman

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 02;57(1):1-13

Carli Friedman, The Council on Quality and Leadership, Towson, MD.

Direct support professional (DSPs) are crucial to long-term services and supports (LTSS) in the United States for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). This study examined how states utilize DSPs' personal care services in Medicaid Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) 1915(c) waivers across the nation. We found extreme variance across states and services; ensuring people with IDD receive quality services demands this lack of standardization is reduced. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.1.1DOI Listing
February 2019

Understanding Decision Making Among Individuals With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) and Their Siblings.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 02;57(1):26-41

Meghan M. Burke and Chung eun Lee, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Sarah A. Hall, Ashland University; and Zach Rossetti, Boston University.

Many siblings anticipate fulfilling caregiving roles for their brothers and sisters with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Given these roles and the importance of supported decision making, it is crucial to understand how individuals with IDD and their siblings make decisions. Using dyadic interviews, we examined the perspectives of nine sibling dyads ( N = 18) about decision making in relation to self-determination, independent living, and employment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.1.26DOI Listing
February 2019
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Parent Engagement in the Transition From School to Adult Life Through Culturally Sustaining Practices: A Scoping Review.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 10;56(5):307-320

Courtney L. Wilt, University of Kansas; and Mary E. Morningstar, Portland State University.

The increasingly diverse population in the United States calls for schools to address the breadth of cultural histories students bring with them to the classroom. High school students with disabilities are also diverse in terms of cultural histories, race, ethnicities, religions, and citizenship. These factors intersect as families engage in planning for the transition to adulthood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.5.307DOI Listing
October 2018

Empowerment and Resilience in Families of Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 10;56(5):374-388

Jillian A. Caldwell, Jennifer L. Jones, Kami L. Gallus, and Carolyn S. Henry, Oklahoma State University.

Using the family resilience model, we examined the association between empowerment, family member age, length of institutionalization, and resilience among family members of relatives with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) following deinstitutionalization. Participants included 56 family members whose relatives with IDD recently transitioned to community living. Results strongly indicate empowerment plays a key role in positive family adaptation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.5.374DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Grandparents of Children With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Navigating Roles and Relationships.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 10;56(5):354-373

Xueyan Yang, Kathleen Artman-Meeker, and Carly A. Roberts, University of Washington.

Grandparents can play critical roles in the lives of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. However, current research and understanding around grandparent roles and experiences is limited. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the roles and experiences of grandparents supporting children with disabilities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.5.354DOI Listing
October 2018

"We Had to Keep Pushing": Caregivers' Perspectives on Autism Screening and Referral Practices of Black Children in Primary Care.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 10;56(5):321-336

Sarah Dababnah, Wendy E. Shaia, Karen Campion, and Helen M. Nichols, University of Maryland Baltimore, School of Social Work, Baltimore, MD.

Black children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are diagnosed later than their White peers, are more likely to be misdiagnosed, and are less likely to receive early intervention services or a developmental evaluation by three years old. Using a grounded theory approach, we solicited the perspectives of parents and other primary caregivers of Black children with ASD on barriers and facilitators to ASD screening and referrals in primary care. A socioeconomically diverse sample of 22 female caregivers participated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.5.321DOI Listing
October 2018
15 Reads

Introduction to the Special Issue on Partnering With Families of Individuals With Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities Throughout the Lifespan.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 10;56(5):305-306

Hedda Meadan, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; and Melinda R. Snodgrass, Illinois State University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.5.305DOI Listing
October 2018

Hispanic Caregiver Experiences Supporting Positive Postschool Outcomes for Young Adults With Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 10;56(5):337-353

Grace L. Francis, George Mason University; Judith M. S. Gross, Indiana University; Carlos E. Lavín, George Mason University; Lu Ankely Casarez Velazquez, University of Kansas; and Nicholas Sheets, University of Miami.

The rate of competitive employment, or employment in community settings for minimum wage or higher, of working-age individuals with disabilities trails behind individuals without disabilities in the United States. These statistics are even more alarming among Hispanic individuals who have disabilities. The purpose of this study was to explore the negative and positive experiences of Hispanic caregivers from a Midwestern state as they support their family members with disabilities to achieve positive postschool outcomes, including competitive employment. Read More

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http://www.aaiddjournals.org/doi/10.1352/1934-9556-56.5.337
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.5.337DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Transition to Adulthood as a Joint Parent-Youth Project for Young Persons With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 08;56(4):263-277

Anat Zaidman-Zait, University of Tel Aviv; and Richard A. Young, University of British Columbia.

Eight dyads ( N = 16) residing in Western Canada participated in this investigation of how young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and their parents jointly construct, articulate, and act on goals pertinent to the young adults' transition to adulthood. Using the action-project method to collect and analyze conversations and video recall data, cases were grouped representing the ways goal-directed projects brought relationship ( n = 4), planning ( n = 3) or both ( n = 1) to the foreground as joint projects. Resources internal to the dyad such as emotional resources, and external to the dyad, facilitated formulation and pursuit of projects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.5.263DOI Listing
August 2018
5 Reads

Reflections From Co-Researchers With Intellectual Disability: Benefits to Inclusion in a Research Study Team.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 08;56(4):251-262

Karla K. Ausderau, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Kinesiology, Occupational Therapy Program and University of Wisconsin - Madison Waisman Center.

Participatory action research methodologies may empower and protect marginalized individuals; however, they remain underutilized. Limited studies have investigated the impact of participatory action research, specifically on individuals with intellectual disability (ID). This study examines (1) the perspectives of co-researchers with ID on their involvement in the research process and (2) the feasibility of their inclusion based on perspectives of research staff (academic faculty and graduate students without ID). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.5.251DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6348152PMC
August 2018
1 Read

Direct Support Professionals and Quality of Life of People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Authors:
Carli Friedman

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 08;56(4):234-250

Carli Friedman, CQL | The Council on Quality and Leadership.

Direct Support Professionals (DSPs) are the "backbone" of long term services and supports (LTSS) in the United States ( Bogenschutz, Hewitt, Nord, & Hepperlen, 2014 , p. 317). This study examined the relationship between DSPs and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities' (IDD) quality of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.5.234DOI Listing

Lost in Translation: A Reply to Shyman (2016).

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 08;56(4):278-286

David J. Cox, Andrea Villegas, and Molly A. Barlow, University of Florida.

A recently published article sought to determine the extent to which behaviorism and humanism can be reconciled ( Shyman, 2016 ). However, the "current" conceptions of behaviorism and applied behavior analysis (ABA) used for the analysis were based on mischaracterizations, rendering moot many of the points made. Nevertheless, Shyman (2016) highlighted a very important question we believe all helping professionals should attend to: Should normalization be the focus of therapeutic goals? This response article was written to provide readers of this journal an accurate representation of behaviorism and ABA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.5.278DOI Listing
August 2018
19 Reads

The Responsibility to Build Contexts That Enhance Human Functioning and Promote Valued Outcomes for People With Intellectual Disability: Strengthening System Responsiveness.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 08;56(4):287-300

Robert L. Schalock, Hastings College.

This article describes a model that systems can use to build contexts that enhance human functioning and promote valued outcomes for individuals with intellectual disability (ID). Our premise is that that systems have a responsibility to build contexts that enhance human functioning and promote valued outcomes for people with ID, and that this obligation can be met through the use of contextual analysis to deliberately design and implement support strategies that are responsive to identified contextual factors. The model employs a 2-step process to identify context-based independent and intervening variables and align support strategies with identified context-based influencing factors, disability policy goals, and associated outcome domains. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.5.287DOI Listing
August 2018
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Exploring Retirement for Individuals With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: An Analysis of National Core Indicators Data.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 08;56(4):217-233

Julie E. D. Kramme and Kelly Nye-Lengerman, University of Minnesota.

To begin to understand retirement, we examined age-related differences in (a) employment rates, employment hours, and rates of individual-plan employment goals; and (b) participation rates in unpaid formal day programs. We report weighted analyses of 2014-15 National Core Indicators data from 32 states. Unlike younger age groups, a similar proportion of workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities continued working beyond age 65 as for the general community. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.5.217DOI Listing
August 2018
19 Reads

Assessing the Confidence of Australian Mental Health Practitioners in Delivering Therapy to People With Intellectual Disability.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 06;56(3):202-211

Anastasia Hronis, Lynette Roberts, and Ian Kneebone, University of Technology Sydney.

Research supports the use of psychological therapies among people with mild to moderate intellectual disability (ID). One barrier to people with ID accessing psychological treatments is the confidence of mental health practitioners. This article explores the confidence of Australian clinicians in providing therapy to people with ID. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.3.202DOI Listing

Living Without Restraint: One Parent's Reflections and Recommendations for Supporting At-Risk Individuals With Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 06;56(3):155-164

Wilfred Beaudoin, Cranston, RI; and Adam Moore, University of Rhode Island.

In the past several years, there has been an important movement to reduce the utilization of restraint for individuals with developmental disabilities. Legislatures, local and national, are taking on the task of shaping the way that our culture supports people who, up until now, have been often treated in a punitive manner rather than truly supportive in a therapeutic way. Schools and systems of care struggle to identify strategies that offer more positive outcomes to all individuals, even those with challenging behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.3.155DOI Listing

Choice and Control Within Family Relationships: The Lived Experience of Adults With Intellectual Disability.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 06;56(3):188-201

Bernadette Curryer and Roger J. Stancliffe, The University of Sydney, Centre for Disability Research and Policy, Lidcombe, Australia; Angela Dew, UNSW Australia, School of Social Sciences, Arts and Social Sciences, Sydney, Australia; and Michele Y. Wiese, Western Sydney University, School of Social Sciences and Psychology, Kingswood, Australia.

Increased choice and control is a driving force of current disability policy in Australia for people with disability and their families. Yet little is known of how adults with intellectual disability (ID) actually experience choice and control within their family relationships. We used interpretative phenomenological analysis of individual, semistructured interviews conducted with 8 Australian adults with ID to understand the meaning given to their experience of family support received around choice and decision making. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.3.188DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Minimizing Restraint and Seclusion in Schools: A Response to Beaudoin and Moore.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 06;56(3):165-170

Virginia L. Walker, Illinois State University; and Sarah E. Pinkelman, Utah State University.

Increasing efforts have been made in the field of special education to identify positive, evidence-based practices (EBPs) to meet the needs of students who engage in problem behavior, with a major goal being to eliminate or limit the use of reactive measures such as restraint and seclusion ( Snell & Walker, 2014 ). Various stakeholders, including families and self-advocates, have voiced concerns about the dangers of restraint and seclusion and the lack of protection afforded to students who engage in severe problem behavior. In the previous article in this issue of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Beaudoin and Moore (2018) echo these concerns in their account of a family's experience with restraint as told from the perspective of a father whose son was subjected to restraint, resulting in a number of adverse short- and long-term consequences that affected the entire family. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.3.165DOI Listing

Restraint, Restrictive Intervention, and Seclusion of People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 06;56(3):171-187

Carli Friedman, The Council on Quality and Leadership; and Caitlin Crabb, Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Restraint, restrictive interventions, and seclusion are hotly contested practices with inconclusive evidence of their effectiveness. Because the use of restraint and seclusion on people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) is controversial and its effectiveness doubtable, this study was conducted to explore if and how they were permitted in Medicaid HCBS 1915(c) waivers, the largest providers of long-term services and supports (LTSS) for people with IDD. To do so, 111 fiscal year 2015 IDD waivers from across the nation were examined to determine if and how states permitted restraint, restrictive interventions, and seclusion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.3.171DOI Listing

Adverse Childhood Experiences Among Direct Support Professionals.

Authors:
John M Keesler

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 04;56(2):119-132

John M. Keesler, Indiana University.

Direct support professionals (DSPs) provide integral support to many individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Yet, individuals' access to qualified DSPs is often compromised as organizations struggle to hire and retain DSPs. Despite a vast body of research exploring factors associated with turnover, adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) among DSPs remain absent from the literature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.2.119DOI Listing

Identifying the Correlates and Barriers of Future Planning Among Parents of Individuals With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 04;56(2):90-100

Meghan Burke, Department of Special Education, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Catherine Arnold, Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago; and Aleksa Owen, Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Although individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are living longer lives, fewer than half of parents of individuals with IDD conduct future planning. The correlates and barriers to future planning must be identified to develop targeted interventions to facilitate future planning. In this study, 388 parents of individuals with IDD responded to a national, web-based survey. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.2.90DOI Listing
April 2018
6 Reads

Impact of Medicaid Managed Care on Illinois's Acute Health Services Expenditures for Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 04;56(2):133-146

Kiyoshi Yamaki, University of Illinois at Chicago; Coady Wing, Indiana University Bloomington; and Dale Mitchell, Randall Owen, and Tamar Heller, University of Illinois at Chicago.

States have increasingly transitioned Medicaid enrollees with disabilities from fee-for-service (FFS) to Medicaid Managed Care (MMC), intending to reduce state Medicaid spending and to provide better access to health services. Yet, previous studies on the impact of MMC are limited and findings are inconsistent. We analyzed the impact of MMC on costs by tracking Illinois's Medicaid acute health services expenditures for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) living in the community ( n = 1,216) before and after their transition to MMC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.2.133DOI Listing
April 2018
3 Reads

Health Services Use and Costs for Americans With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A National Analysis.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 04;56(2):101-118

Glenn T. Fujiura, University of Illinois, Chicago; Henan Li, Brandeis University, and Sandy Magaña, University of Texas.

Health services and associated costs for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) were nationally profiled and the predictors of high expense users statistically modeled. Using linked data from the National Health Interview Survey and Medical Expenditure Panel Survey for the years 2002 through 2011, the study found a mixed pattern of differences in rates of service use and costs when compared to the general population depending upon personal characteristics, health status, and type of health care service. Prescription medication costs were the primary driver of total health care expenditures for Americans with IDD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.2.101DOI Listing
April 2018
7 Reads

A Holistic Theoretical Approach to Intellectual Disability: Going Beyond the Four Current Perspectives.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 04;56(2):79-89

Robert L. Schalock, Hastings College; Ruth Luckasson, University of New Mexico; Marc J. Tassé, The Ohio State University; and Miguel Angel Verdugo, University of Salamanca, Spain.

This article describes a holistic theoretical framework that can be used to explain intellectual disability (ID) and organize relevant information into a usable roadmap to guide understanding and application. Developing the framework involved analyzing the four current perspectives on ID and synthesizing this information into a holistic theoretical framework. Practices consistent with the framework are described, and examples are provided of how multiple stakeholders can apply the framework. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.2.79DOI Listing
April 2018
3 Reads

Life Outcomes and Higher Education: The Need for Longitudinal Research Using a Broad Range of Quality of Life Indicators.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 02;56(1):69-74

Kathleen Sheppard-Jones, Harold Kleinert, and Laura Butler, University of Kentucky; and Barry Whaley, Southeast ADA Center - Burton Blatt Institute.

Higher education is increasingly becoming an option for young adults with intellectual disability (ID). Although initial evaluations of postsecondary education for this population have been promising, a broader "quality of life" framework needs to be adopted in order to truly understand the impact of these programs. Moreover, researchers and program evaluators must collect longitudinal data that follows former students for multiple years and uses multiple measures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.1.69DOI Listing
February 2018
2 Reads

Reproductive Cancer Treatment Hospitalizations of U.S. Women With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 02;56(1):1-12

Susan L. Parish, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University; Esther Son, Department of Social Work, College of Staten Island, City University of New York; Robyn M. Powell, Lurie Institute for Disability Policy, The Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University; and Leah Igdalsky, Lurie Institute for Disability Policy, The Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University.

There is a dearth of existing research on the treatment of reproductive cancers among women with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). This study analyzed the 2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample and compared the prevalence of reproductive cancer treatment hospitalization discharges among women with and without IDD. Discharges linked to women with IDD had higher incidences of cancer of the uterus and lower prevalence of cancer of the cervix. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.1.1DOI Listing
February 2018

Participant Direction for People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Medicaid Home and Community Based Services Waivers.

Authors:
Carli Friedman

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 02;56(1):30-39

Carli Friedman, The Council on Quality and Leadership.

Participant direction allows people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and/or their families to direct services; in doing so, participant direction shifts participants from passive recipients to active consumers. Medicaid encourages, but does not require, states to allow participant direction. The aim of this study was to examine if and how states permitted participant direction in Medicaid HCBS 1915(c) waivers for people with IDD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-56.1.30DOI Listing
February 2018

Résumés en Français.

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 02;56(1):75-76

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February 2018
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The Perceived Role of Direct Support Professionals in the Health Promotion Efforts of Adults With Developmental Disabilities Receiving Support Services.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 02;56(1):40-55

Kendall A. Leser, School of Community and Environmental Health, Old Dominion University; Phyllis L. Pirie, College of Public Health: Division of Health Behavior and Health Promotion, The Ohio State University; Amy K. Ferketich, College of Public Health: Division of Epidemiology, The Ohio State University; Susan M. Havercamp, The Nisonger Center, The Ohio State University; Mary Ellen Wewers, College of Public Health: Division of Health Behavior and Health Promotion, The Ohio State University.

Direct support professionals (DSPs) play a large social role in the lives of people with developmental disabilities (DD) and have the potential to influence their health behaviors. Six qualitative focus groups ( n = 48) were conducted with DD community agency administrators, DSPs, family members and adults with DD to better understand the perceived role of DSPs in the health promotion efforts of those with DD. Findings from this study suggest that DSPs experience several barriers when trying to promote the health of those with DD, one of which is fear of violating the rights of people with DD. Read More

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February 2018
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Use of Transition Resources by Primary Care Providers for Youth With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 02;56(1):56-68

Paul B. Dressler, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; Teresa K. Nguyen, University of Colorado School of Public Health; Eric J. Moody, Sandra L. Friedman, and Laura Pickler, University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) often experience difficulties with successful transition from pediatric to adult healthcare. A consultative Transition Clinic for youth with IDD was piloted as a quality improvement project, and assessed the engagement of primary care providers (PCPs) for transition planning after patients were seen in clinic. Although many PCPs found the clinic and resources useful, individual and systemic barriers often prohibited them from participating in transition planning for this patient population. Read More

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February 2018
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Assessing Character Strengths in Youth With Intellectual Disability: Reliability and Factorial Validity of the VIA-Youth.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 02;56(1):13-29

Karrie A. Shogren, Leslie A. Shaw, Sheida K. Raley, and Michael L. Wehmeyer, University of Kansas; Ryan M. Niemiec, VIA Institute on Character; and Megan Adkins, University of Kansas.

This article reports the results of an examination of the endorsement, reliability, and factorial validity of the VIA-Youth and assessment of character strengths and virtues developed for the general population in youth with and without intellectual disability. Findings suggest that, generally, youth with intellectual disability endorsed character strengths as being like them at lower levels, although few differences were significant. Issues related to measurement, particularly the establishment of measurement invariance, emerged for some virtues. Read More

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February 2018
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Resúmenes al Español.

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2018 02;56(1):77-78

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February 2018
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Prevalence of Dysphagia in People With Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2017 12;55(6):377-391

Janet Robertson, Lancaster University, United Kingdom; Darren Chadwick, University of Wolverhampton, United Kingdom; Susannah Baines, Lancaster University, United Kingdom; Eric Emerson, Lancaster University, United Kingdom and University of Sydney, Australia; and Chris Hatton, Lancaster University, United Kingdom.

Dysphagia (feeding and swallowing disorder) is associated with serious health complications and psychosocial sequelae. This review summarizes international research relating to the prevalence of dysphagia in people with intellectual disability. Studies published from 1990 to July 2016 were identified using Medline, Cinahl, PsycINFO, Web of Science, email requests, and cross-citations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-55.6.377DOI Listing
December 2017
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Development of the Supported Decision Making Inventory System.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2017 12;55(6):432-439

Karrie A. Shogren, Michael L. Wehmeyer, Hatice Uyanik, and Megan Heidrich, University of Kansas.

Supported decision making has received increased attention as an alternative to guardianship and a means to enable people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to exercise their right to legal capacity. Assessments are needed that can used by people with disabilities and their systems of supports to identify and plan for needed supports to enable decision making. This article describes the steps taken to develop such an assessment tool, the Supported Decision Making Inventory System (SDMIS), and initial feedback received from self-advocates with intellectual disability. Read More

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http://www.aaiddjournals.org/doi/10.1352/1934-9556-55.6.432
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-55.6.432DOI Listing
December 2017
6 Reads

Presidential Address: Promoting Health and Wellness.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2017 12;55(6):365-369

Susan M. Havercamp, The Ohio State University.

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December 2017
5 Reads

Resúmenes al Español.

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2017 12;55(6):442-443

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December 2017

Linking Staff Burnout to Family Members' Satisfaction in Centers for People With Intellectual Disabilities: A Service Chain Approach.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2017 12;55(6):392-406

Carolina Moliner and Laura Lorente, IDOCAL, Universidad de Valencia, Spain; Agustín Molina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile; Esther Gracia and Vicente Martínez-Tur, IDOCAL, Universidad de Valencia, Spain.

Research in centers for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities has somewhat neglected the relationship between workers' burnout and users' service evaluations. Two independent survey studies tested this connection. In the first study (100 centers, 714 workers, and 612 family members), results confirmed that burnout has a negative relationship with workers' perceptions of service quality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-55.6.392DOI Listing
December 2017
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Self-Advocacy Services for People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A National Analysis.

Authors:
Carli Friedman

Intellect Dev Disabil 2017 12;55(6):370-376

Carli Friedman, CQL | The Council on Quality and Leadership.

Self-advocacy plays an important role in facilitating the empowerment of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), and helps people with IDD develop the skills necessary for the participant direction of services. The purpose of this study was to examine Medicaid Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) 1915(c) waivers across the nation to determine how states were utilizing self-advocacy services for people with IDD. Findings revealed approximately half of waivers provided self-advocacy services; however, less than . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-55.6.370DOI Listing
December 2017
1 Read