581 results match your criteria Ajidd-american Journal On Intellectual And Developmental Disabilities[Journal]


They Care for Others, But What About Themselves? Understanding Self-Care Among DSPs' and Its Relationship to Professional Quality of Life.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 Jun;58(3):221-240

John M. Keesler and Jess Troxel, Indiana University Bloomington.

Direct support professionals (DSPs) are instrumental to the daily operations of organizations that support people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). With extensive responsibilities, DSPs often experience high levels of stress and burnout that can result in turnover and vacant positions. Self-care is the practice of behaviors that promote well-being, counter work-related stress, and foster resilience. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.3.221DOI Listing

Implementing Living Independent From Tobacco With Dyads of People With Disabilities and Their Caregivers: Successes and Lessons Learned.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 Jun;58(3):241-250

Susan M. Havercamp, The Ohio State University Nisonger Center.

People with disabilities have more health complications and higher healthcare utilization related to tobacco use than people without disabilities. Yet, they are less likely to use tobacco cessation resources. Important to meaningful and lasting health behavior change are relationships developed in the home, workplace, and community. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.3.241DOI Listing

Conclusion to the Special Issue: Understanding the Direct Support Workforce in the United States.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 Jun;58(3):251-252

Carol B. Laws, University of Georgia.

This special issue sheds light on the needs of the direct support professionals (DSPs), as well the possibilities when positive practices are implemented. A commitment to quality services and quality lives requires a commitment to finding solutions that better support DSPs so they can afford (emotionally, physically and financially) to keep doing the work they love. Improving supports to people with IDD is contingent on improving the compensation, working conditions, professional development, and career opportunities of DSPs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.3.251DOI Listing

From the DSP Perspective: Exploring the Use of Practices That Align With Trauma-Informed Care in Organizations Serving People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Authors:
John M Keesler

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 Jun;58(3):208-220

John M. Keesler, Indiana University Bloomington.

Trauma-informed care (TIC) is a systemwide approach that emphasizes organizational practices based upon principles of safety, choice, collaboration, empowerment, and trustworthiness. It is intended to influence an entire organization, with implications for clients and the workforce. The present study explored the extent to which IDD organizations utilize practices that align with TIC with their DSP workforce. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.3.208DOI Listing

Predictors of Annual and Early Separations Among Direct Support Professionals: National Core Indicators Staff Stability Survey.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 Jun;58(3):192-207

James Houseworth, Sandra L. Pettingell, Julie E.D. Kramme, Renáta Tichá, and Amy S. Hewitt, University of Minnesota, Institute on Community Integration.

Direct support professionals (DSPs) provide a broad range of supports in a variety of settings to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) that enables people to live, work, and participate in their communities. Despite the crucial importance in ensuring supports for community participation of people with IDD, high rates of annual turnover among DSPs in organizations that employ them have been documented for decades. This study utilizes National Core Indicators Staff Stability data from 2016 to examine the impact of organizational- and state-level factors related to DSP turnover, including annual DSP turnover and the percentage of DSPs who left their positions after less than 6 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.3.192DOI Listing

Integrating Health Promotion in the Everyday Life of People With Intellectual Disability-The Extent to Which Current Initiatives Take Context Into Account.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 04;58(2):170-179

Noortje M. J. Kuijken, Jenneken Naaldenberg, Kristel Vlot-van Anrooij, Maria W. G. Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Henny M. J. van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, and Geraline L. Leusink, Radboud University Medical Center.

Taking the dynamics of everyday life into account is important for health behavior change. Surveys were conducted to gain insight into available health promoting physical activity and nutrition initiatives in the everyday life of people with intellectual disability (ID). Researchers considered characteristics of the initiatives and the attention they give to resources and hindering factors of healthy living for people with ID. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.2.170DOI Listing

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 04;58(2):183-185

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.2.183DOI Listing

Effectiveness of Online Training and Supervisor Feedback on Safe Eating and Drinking Practices for Individuals With Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 04;58(2):111-125

Emaley McCulloch, Relias Institute; Audra Cuckler, Easter Seals; Elise Valdes, Relias Institute; and M. Courtney Hughes, Northern Illinois University.

Dysphagia is common in individuals with developmental disabilities. Little research exists on the impact of trainings aimed at improving Direct Care Staff's (DCS) use of safe eating and drinking practices. This article presents two studies using pre-and postexperimental design, evaluating online training to improve DCSs' knowledge and ability to identify nonadherence to diet orders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.2.111DOI Listing

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Birth Outcomes and Labor and Delivery Charges Among Massachusetts Women With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 04;58(2):126-138

Ilhom Akobirshoev and Monika Mitra, Brandeis University; Susan L. Parish, Virginia Commonwealth University; Anne Valentine, Brandeis University; and Tiffany A. Moore Simas, University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Understanding the pregnancy experiences of racial and ethnic minority women with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) is critical to ensuring that policies can effectively support these women. This research analyzed data from the 1998-2013 Massachusetts Pregnancy to Early Life Longitudinal (PELL) data system to examine the racial and ethnic disparities in birth outcomes and labor and delivery charges of U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.2.126DOI Listing

Families Requesting Advocates for Children With Disabilities: The Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How of Special Education Advocacy.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 04;58(2):158-169

Samantha E. Goldman, Assumption College; Meghan M. Burke, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign; and Ellen G. Casale, Morgan A. Frazier, and Robert M. Hodapp, Vanderbilt University.

Because parents face barriers in advocating for their children within the special education system, some families request help from a special education advocate. In this study, we evaluated the perceptions of caregivers who requested advocacy support to understand why, for whom, when, and where the advocacy services were needed; how the advocate helped; and what the outcomes of the advocacy process were and which variables related to better outcomes. We conducted structured interviews with 36 families who had requested help and connected with an advocate over a 3-year period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.2.158DOI Listing

Identifying Predictors for Enhanced Outcomes for People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 04;58(2):139-157

Parthenia Dinora, Matthew Bogenschutz, and Michael Broda, Virginia Commonwealth University.

People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) often rely on Medicaid-funded services and supports to facilitate their daily living. The financial investment for these services is significant, yet little work has been conducted to understand how these investments affect life outcomes. This pilot study used a novel data integration approach to offer initial insights about how Medicaid expenditures relate to outcomes using Medicaid claims data, results of the National Core Indicators consumer survey, and data from the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.2.139DOI Listing

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 04;58(2):180-182

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.2.180DOI Listing

Using a Multidimensional Model to Analyze Context and Enhance Personal Outcomes.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 04;58(2):95-110

Karrie A. Shogren, University of Kansas; Ruth Luckasson, University of New Mexico; and Robert L. Schalock, Hastings College.

This article describes a multidimensional model of context that identifies, defines, and explains three key properties of context: multilevel, multifactorial, and interactive. The use of this model to drive a context-based enhancement cycle is also described. The enhancement cycle involves four steps: (a) identifying current interactions that influence personal goals and outcomes; (b) targeting the interaction that will have the highest impact on selected outcomes for the individual; (c) manipulating the contextual factors that will positively influence the interaction; and (d) evaluating the impact of the manipulated interaction on personal outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.2.95DOI Listing

Defining Inclusion: Faculty and Student Attitudes Regarding Postsecondary Education for Students With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 02;58(1):65-81

Carly B. Gilson, Christina M. Gushanas, Yi-Fan Li, and Kaitlin Foster, Texas A&M University, Department of Educational Psychology.

Inclusion across education contexts is critical to acknowledge and inspire the full potential of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). In the early stages of a postsecondary education program's development, peers and faculty are integral stakeholders to promoting an inclusive campus life. We conducted a campus-wide survey at a large public university to evaluate the perspectives of 1,867 faculty and students regarding their views of inclusion in student life and their attitudes toward prospective students with IDD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.1.65DOI Listing
February 2020

Effects of Using an iPad to Teach Early Literacy Skills to Elementary Students With Intellectual Disability.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 02;58(1):34-48

Minkowan Goo, Diane Myers, and Adela L. Maurer, Texas Woman's University; and Robert Serwetz, Northwest Independent School District.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of using an iPad to teach early literacy skills to students with intellectual disability (ID). Three elementary students with mild to moderate levels of ID participated in the study. We used a multiple-probe design across students to examine a functional relationship between using an iPad providing visual supports and the acquisition of phonemic segmentation skills. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.1.34DOI Listing
February 2020

Special Education Supports and Services for Rett Syndrome: Parent Perceptions and Satisfaction.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 02;58(1):49-64

Kelsey Larriba-Quest, Indiana University; Breanne J. Byiers, University of Minnesota; Arthur Beisang, Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare, and Alyssa M. Merbler and Frank J. Symons, University of Minnesota.

There are no published studies describing educational experiences for girls with Rett syndrome. Given the extensive educational needs associated with Rett syndrome, it is important to understand how families perceive their daughters' educational experiences to inform education service provision. The purpose of this study was to survey parents of school-aged children with Rett syndrome to describe the educational services that they receive and understand parents' perceptions of and satisfaction with the special educational and related services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.1.49DOI Listing
February 2020

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 02;58(1):91-92

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.1.91DOI Listing
February 2020

Social Connections Among Siblings With and Without Intellectual Disability or Autism.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 02;58(1):19-33

Hilary E. Travers, Vanderbilt University; Mary Elizabeth Carlton, Dare County Schools, Nags Head, NC; Erik W. Carter, Vanderbilt University.

Although the significance of sibling relationships is widely affirmed, little is known about these relationships in young adulthood. In this study, we examined the experiences and perspectives of 155 siblings (ages 18-30) of individuals with intellectual disability or autism. Our focus was on how young adults spend time with their brother or sister with a disability, the ways in which they view their relationship, and the expectations they hold for the future. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.1.19DOI Listing
February 2020

Family and Practitioner Perspectives on Prenatal Early Intervention.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 02;58(1):1-18

Bonnie Keilty, Hunter College, City University of New York; and JaneDiane Smith, University of North Carolina, Charlotte.

Increasingly, families know prenatally of certain diagnoses with a high probability of developmental delays. These diagnoses could result in eligibility for Part C early intervention (EI) postnatally. Although prenatal developmental interventions (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.1.1DOI Listing
February 2020

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 02;58(1):93-94

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February 2020

The Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction and Students With Extensive Support Needs in Inclusive Settings.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2020 02;58(1):82-90

Sheida K. Raley, University of Kansas, Kansas University on Developmental Disabilities; Kathryn M. Burke, Temple University, College of Education; Mayumi Hagiwara, Karrie A. Shogren, Michael L. Wehmeyer, and Jennifer A. Kurth, University of Kansas, Kansas University Center on Developmental Disabilities.

There is a strong link between the development of skills associated with self-determination (i.e., choice-making, decision-making, problem solving, goal setting and attainment, planning, self-management, self-advocacy, self-awareness, and self-knowledge) and positive school (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-58.1.82DOI Listing
February 2020

Facets of Faith: Spirituality, Religiosity, and Parents of Individuals With Intellectual Disability.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 12;57(6):512-526

Thomas L. Boehm, Wheaton College; and Erik W. Carter, Vanderbilt University.

Although faith has particular prominence in the contemporary American landscape, its intersection with disability and families has received little attention. We examined the spiritual and religious lives of 530 parents and caregivers of family members who have intellectual disability. For most participants, faith had clear relevance and was reflected in their congregational participation, beliefs, practices, and strength of faith. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.6.512DOI Listing
December 2019

Case Management Workforce Supporting People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Indications of a New Frontier of the Workforce Crisis.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 12;57(6):499-511

Matthew D. Bogenschutz, and Parthenia A. Dinora,Virginia Commonweath University; Khalilah R. Johnson, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill.

Case management (CM) is one of the most commonly used services by individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), but little is known about the workers who provide CM. This study used a mixed methods approach to gain understanding of the CM workforce in one U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.6.499DOI Listing
December 2019

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 12;57(6):551-552

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.6.551DOI Listing
December 2019

A Description of Parent Input in IEP Development Through Analysis IEP Documents.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 12;57(6):485-498

Jennifer A. Kurth, University of Kansas; Jessica A. McQueston, University of Wisconsin - Madison; Andrea L. Ruppar, University of Wisconsin - Madison; Samantha Gross Toews, University of Kansas; Russell Johnston, California State University, Fullerton; and Katie M. McCabe, University of Wisconsin - Madison.

Parent input in individualized education program (IEP) development is the clear expectation in U.S. education law. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.6.485DOI Listing
December 2019

Feedback and Strategies From People With Intellectual Disability Completing a Personalized Online Weight Loss Intervention: A Qualitative Analysis.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 12;57(6):527-544

Nichole Guerra, The Resource Exchange; William H. Neumeier, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Lakeshore Foundation; Lauren Breslin, Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine; Betty Geer, The Resource Exchange; Mohanraj Thirumalai, University of Alabama at Birmingham; David A. Ervin, Jewish Foundation for Group Homes, Inc.; and James H. Rimmer, University of Alabama at Birmingham and The Lakeshore Foundation.

Coaching log notes for 15 participants from a 24-week blended online and telehealth randomized controlled trial were analyzed using thematic analysis and analyst triangulation to determine the factors that facilitated participant adherence to weight loss strategies, use of technology, and motivational interviewing. Several participants reported that restricting processed carbohydrates, limiting portion size, and maintaining healthy substitutions were effective nutritional strategies. Participants were less successful with adherence to their exercise goals, often due to time constraints and a lack of support. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.6.527DOI Listing
December 2019

Résumés en Français.

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 12;57(6):549-550

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.6.549DOI Listing
December 2019

A Call for Better Data on Prevalence and Health Surveillance of People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Authors:
Gloria L Krahn

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 10;57(5):357-375

Gloria L. Krahn, Oregon State University, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Corvallis.

The U.S. approach to the health of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) is fraught with paradox. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.5.357DOI Listing
October 2019
7 Reads

What Matters in Population Health and How We Count It Among People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 10;57(5):347-356

Susan M. Havercamp, The Ohio State University Nisonger Center; and Gloria L. Krahn, Oregon State University.

This issue, presents an overview of health surveillance research for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in the United States. Although public health now conducts surveillance of people with disabilities broadly defined and compares their health status with that of individuals without disabilities, there are many challenges in conducting health surveillance of people with IDD. Difficulties include how to define cases, how to find cases, and how to obtain accurate information ( Krahn, Fox, Campbell, Ramon, & Jesien, 2010 ). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.5.347DOI Listing
October 2019
3 Reads

Technology Tools: Increasing Our Reach in National Surveillance of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 10;57(5):463-475

Jordan B. Wagner, Minje Kim, and Marc J. Tassé, The Ohio State University, Nisonger Center, Columbus.

Challenges in collecting comprehensive health surveillance data on people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are numerous. A number of important issues and strategies are discussed in the articles contained in this special issue of . In this article, we focus on the advances and tools available in the area of technology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.5.463DOI Listing
October 2019
2 Reads

From Invisible to Visible to Valued: Improving Population Health of People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 10;57(5):476-481

Gloria L. Krahn, Oregon State University, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Corvallis; and Susan M. Havercamp, The Ohio State University Nisonger Center.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.5.476DOI Listing
October 2019

A Systematic Review of U.S. Studies on the Prevalence of Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities Since 2000.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 10;57(5):421-438

Lynda Lahti Anderson and Sheryl A. Larson, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; Sarah MapelLentz, Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul; and Jennifer Hall-Lande, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

This systematic review examined 14 U.S. studies published since 2000 reporting prevalence estimates for intellectual disability (ID) or developmental disability (DD). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.5.421DOI Listing
October 2019
2 Reads

Identifying People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in National Population Surveys.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 10;57(5):376-389

Susan M. Havercamp, Ohio State University Nisonger Center; Gloria L. Krahn, Oregon State University; Sheryl A. Larson, University of Minnesota; Glenn Fujiura, University of Illinois Chicago; Tawara D. Goode, Georgetown University Medical Center; Barbara L. Kornblau, Florida A&M University; and the National Health Surveillance for IDD Workgroup.

Public health and policy planning for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) is imperiled by the lack of ongoing national surveillance data on prevalence and health status. In 2018, the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities appointed a workgroup of representatives from key federal agencies and national experts to recommend strategies to improve prevalence estimates and health surveillance for people with IDD. This article presents the workgroup findings on the availability of prevalence and health surveillance data for adults with IDD and suggested items that could identify respondents with IDD on national surveys with special attention to modifications in the National Health Interview Survey. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.5.376DOI Listing
October 2019
2 Reads

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 10;57(5):482-484

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.5.482DOI Listing
October 2019

Characteristics of Medicare Beneficiaries With Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 10;57(5):405-420

Amanda Reichard, Administration for Community Living; Elsa Haile, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; and Andrew Morris, Administration for Community Living.

Gaps in knowledge and systematic tracking of the prevalence of intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and characteristics that may affect the health of this disability group limits our ability to address the health disparities they experience in comparison to people without disability. The purpose of this study is to begin to fill one relevant critical gap in knowledge: understanding the demographics and health outcomes of adults with IDD who receive services under Medicare Fee-for-Service (FFS), many of who are also eligible for Medicaid. Using 2016 Medicare administrative claims, we examined the prevalence and characteristics of five diagnosis groups of IDD, in those under 65 and those 65 and over, as well as their health outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.5.405DOI Listing
October 2019
2 Reads

Unlocking the Potential of State Level Data: Opportunities to Monitor Health and Related Outcomes in People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 10;57(5):390-404

Alexandra Bonardi, Human Services Research Institute, Cambridge, MA; Emily Lauer, Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School; Amie Lulinski, University of Colorado; Mary Lee Fay, National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services; Andrew Morris, United States Department of Health & Human Services; Margaret A. Nygren, American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities; and Gloria Krahn, Oregon State University.

No single U.S. health surveillance system adequately describes the health of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.5.390DOI Listing
October 2019
2 Reads

Data Linkage: Canadian and Australian Perspectives on a Valuable Methodology for Intellectual and Developmental Disability Research.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 10;57(5):439-462

Robert Balogh, Ontario Tech University, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada; Helen Leonard and Jenny Bourke, Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth; Kate Brameld, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia; Jenny Downs, Michele Hansen, and Emma Glasson, Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth; Elizabeth Lin, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Meghann Lloyd, Ontario Tech University, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada; Yona Lunsky, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Melissa O'Donnell, Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth; Shahin Shooshtari, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Kingsley Wong, Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth; and Gloria Krahn, Oregon State University, Corvallis.

Data linkage holds great promise for generating new information about people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) as a population, yet few centers have developed the infrastructure to utilize this methodology. Two examples, from Canada and Australia, describe their efforts in building data linkage capabilities, and how linked databases can be used to identify persons with IDD and used for population-based research. The value of data linkage is illustrated through new estimates of prevalence of IDD; health service utilization patterns; associations with sociodemographic characteristics, and with physical and mental health conditions (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.5.439DOI Listing
October 2019
2 Reads

Impact of an Inclusive Postsecondary Education Program on Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Toward Intellectual Disability.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 08;57(4):323-336

Ashley J. Harrison, The University of Georgia; Jennifer B. Bisson, Clemson University; and Carol B. Laws, The University of Georgia.

People with intellectual disability (ID) experience negative consequences as a result of stigmas held by the public. Students with ID involved in inclusive postsecondary education (IPSE) programs demonstrate positive outcomes. This study examines the impact of an IPSE program on typically matriculating student attitudes toward ID. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.4.323DOI Listing
August 2019
2 Reads

The Impact of Medicaid Managed Care on Health Service Utilization Among Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 08;57(4):289-306

Kiyoshi Yamaki, University of Illinois at Chicago; Coady Wing, Indiana University Bloomington; and Dale Mitchell, Randall Owen, and Tamar Heller, University of Illinois at Chicago.

People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are frequent users of health services. We examined how their service utilization of emergency department (ED), inpatient hospitalization, and primary care physicians changed as they transitioned from fee-for-service to Medicaid managed care (MMC). Our results showed that MMC reduced the utilization of all of these services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.4.289DOI Listing
August 2019
3 Reads

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 08;57(4):344-346

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.4.344DOI Listing

A Rose Is a Rose Is a Rose: A Response to Cox et al. (2018).

Authors:
Eric Shyman

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 08;57(4):337-338

Eric Shyman, St. Joseph's College, New York.

Cox, Villegas, and Barlow (2018) published a reply to an article in which I ( Shyman, 2016 ) argued that there were fundamental philosophical problems with behavior analytic intervention that prevent it from being considered as a humanistic approach. A number of important points were raised about the argument including criticisms and the need for clarifications, as well as merits. This article will provide a response to three of the main critiques proffered by the authors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.4.337DOI Listing
August 2019
1 Read

Interactions of High School Students With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Inclusive Classrooms.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 08;57(4):307-322

Yun-Ching Chung, Department of Special Education, Illinois State University; Karen H. Douglas, School of Teacher Education and Leadership, Radford University; Virginia L. Walker, Department of Special Education and Child Development, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Rachel L. Wells, Thomas Metcalf Laboratory School, Illinois State University.

As inclusive opportunities increase for students with disabilities, additional research is needed to examine high school students' classroom interactions. This descriptive study explores the nature of the social interactions of 10 high school students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in the general education classroom. Findings from our observations indicated that students with IDD interacted with peers during approximately one out of every four minutes and interacted with the general educator during one out of every 10 minutes, less than their peer comparisons' interactions with peers and teachers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.4.307DOI Listing

Still Lost in Translation.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 08;57(4):339-340

Molly A. Barlow and Andrea Villegas, University of Florida; and David J. Cox, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Interdisciplinary dialogue can help progress and improve professional fields. Progress and improvement may be impeded by barriers within an interdisciplinary dialogue, two of which are false dichotomies and faulty generalizations. It is our opinion that this particular interdisciplinary dialogue will advance productively by avoiding: false dichotomies about the medical model and Disability Studies in Education (DSE) framework; false dichotomies about using a normality approach to establish goals; and faulty generalizations about practitioners within and outside the field in which we are trained. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.4.339DOI Listing

Résumés en Français.

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 08;57(4):341-343

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.4.341DOI Listing

The Relationship Between Disability Prejudice and Institutionalization of People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Authors:
Carli Friedman

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 08;57(4):263-273

Carli Friedman, CQL | The Council on Quality and Leadership, Towson, MD.

There are decades of research indicating ableism is extremely prominent. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between disability prejudice and institutionalization of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). This study had two research questions: (1) How does disability prejudice impact the number of people with IDD who are institutionalized in a state? and (2) How does disability prejudice impact spending on institutions? To do so, we utilized secondary data about state utilization of institutions (fiscal year 2015), and disability prejudice data from 325,000 people. Read More

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August 2019
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The Assessment of Self-Determination in Spanish and American Adolescents: The Self-Determination Inventory: Student Report.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 08;57(4):274-288

Karrie A. Shogren, University of Kansas, Beach Center on Disability and Kansas University Center on Developmental Disabilities; Leslie A. Shaw, Cornell University, Yang-Tan Institute on Employment and Disability; and Cristina Mumbardó-Adam, Education and Sports Sciences, Blanquerna, Ramon Llull University, Spain.

The purpose of this study was to explore the cross-cultural validity of the Self-Determination Inventory: Student Report, a newly developed measure of self-determination grounded in Causal Agency Theory. The tool was translated to Spanish and administered to American and Spanish adolescents. The sample was structured to include adolescents with and without intellectual disability in both cultural contexts. Read More

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August 2019
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Restrictions, Power, Companionship, and Intimacy: A Metasynthesis of People With Intellectual Disability Speaking About Sex and Relationships.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 06;57(3):212-233

Rhonda S. Black, University of Hawaii at Manoa; and Rebecca R. Kammes, Michigan State University.

Examining literature that tells us what people with intellectual disability (PWID) think and feel about their sexual lives may enable families and professionals to offer a more person-centered approach to education and support. Examining the voices of many individuals across several studies may provide more convincing evidence about the experiences of these individuals-turning a solo into a chorus. Thus, the purpose of this article is to describe the results of a metasynthesis of qualitative studies highlighting the voices of PWID with respect to relationships and sexuality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.3.212DOI Listing
June 2019
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Exploring the Valley of Savings: Minimizing Part D Costs and Optimizing Drug Therapy Outcomes in Medicare Beneficiaries With Developmental Disability.

Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 06;57(3):234-241

Edward L. Rogan, Carly A. Ranson, Traci K. Mori, Salley K. Park, Howard M. Lam, Jamie F. Legaspi, Lan Kim Tran, Christine Julie M. Cameros, Amy Natsuki Blackburn, Sandra T. Lee, Cynthia S. Valle-Oseguera, Christopher N. Pham, Joseph A. Woelfel, and Rajul A. Patel, University of the Pacific, Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy, Stockton, CA.

Nonelderly disabled Medicare beneficiaries have a higher prevalence of chronic conditions, higher utilization of prescription medications, and increased demand for clinical services when compared to beneficiaries 65 years of age and older who are not disabled. Out-of-pocket costs and medication-related problems are major barriers to medication compliance and achievement of therapeutic goals. A school of pharmacy partnered with a nonprofit organization that provides care to individuals with developmental disabilities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.3.234DOI Listing
June 2019
2 Reads

Résumés en Français.

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Intellect Dev Disabil 2019 06;57(3):259-260

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-57.3.259DOI Listing
June 2019
1 Read