102 results match your criteria Agriculture And Human Values[Journal]


Veganic farming in the United States: farmer perceptions, motivations, and experiences.

Agric Human Values 2021 Jun 7:1-21. Epub 2021 Jun 7.

Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Vermont, 63 Carrigan Drive, Burlington, VT 05405 USA.

Veganic agriculture, often described as farming that is free of synthetic and animal-based inputs, represents an alternative to chemical-based industrial agriculture and the prevailing alternative, organic agriculture, respectively. Despite the promise of veganic methods in diverse realms such as food safety, environmental sustainability, and animal liberation, it has a small literature base. This article draws primarily on interviews conducted in 2018 with 25 veganic farmers from 19 farms in the United States to establish some baseline empirical research on this farming community. Read More

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Seeing the workers for the trees: exalted and devalued manual labour in the Pacific Northwest craft cider industry.

Authors:
Anelyse M Weiler

Agric Human Values 2021 May 30:1-14. Epub 2021 May 30.

Department of Sociology, STN CSC, University of Victoria, PO Box 3050, Victoria, BC V8W 3P5 Canada.

Craft food and beverage makers regularly emphasize transparency about the ethical, sustainable sourcing of their ingredients and the human labour underpinning their production, all of which helps elevate the status of their products and occupational communities. Yet, as with other niche ethical consumption markets, craft industries continue to rely on employment conditions for agricultural workers that reproduce inequalities of race, class, and citizenship in the dominant food system. This paper interrogates the contradiction between the exaltation of craft cidermakers' labour and the devaluation of farmworker labour by assessing how craft beverage actors make sense of inequalities facing manually skilled agricultural workers. Read More

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Boundary politics and the social imaginary for sustainable food systems.

Authors:
Kim L Niewolny

Agric Human Values 2021 May 2:1-4. Epub 2021 May 2.

Virginia Tech, 282 Litton-Reaves Hall (0343), Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA.

In this essay, Kim Niewolny, current President of AFHVS, responds to the 2020 AFHVS Presidential Address given by Molly Anderson. Niewolny is encouraged by Anderson's message of moving "beyond the boundaries" by focusing our gaze on the insurmountable un-sustainability of the globalized food system. Anderson recommends three ways forward to address current challenges. Read More

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Food support provision in COVID-19 times: a mixed method study based in Greater Manchester.

Authors:
Filippo Oncini

Agric Human Values 2021 Apr 26:1-13. Epub 2021 Apr 26.

Sustainable Consumption Institute and Department of Sociology, University of Manchester, Booth St W, Manchester, M15 6PB UK.

COVID-19 has brought to light the severity of economic inequalities by testing the capacity of the poorest families to make ends meet. Food insecurity has in fact soared all over the UK, with many people forced to rely on food support providers to not go hungry. This paper uses a unique dataset on 55 food support organizations active in Greater Manchester during the first COVID-19 wave, and 41 semi-structured interviews with food aid spokespersons and stakeholders, to shed light on what they overcame, the complications and drawbacks of the food emergency response plan put in place. Read More

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Scholars as allies in the struggle for food systems transformation.

Authors:
Charles Z Levkoe

Agric Human Values 2021 Apr 9:1-4. Epub 2021 Apr 9.

Department of Health Sciences, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Rd, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1 Canada.

Molly Anderson's 2020 Presidential Address for the Agriculture and Human Values Society, is a bold call to action that considers the scope and depth of the challenges facing global food systems. This call has particular relevance to scholars who are closely aligned with struggles for food justice and food sovereignty. In this discussion piece, I suggest additional nuance that builds and expands on Anderson's three opportunities for "pushing beyond the boundaries". Read More

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Translating land justice through comparison: a US-French dialogue and research agenda.

Agric Human Values 2021 Mar 6:1-16. Epub 2021 Mar 6.

UMR Innovation, INRAE, CIRAD, Montpellier University, Montpelier, France.

In this discussion piece, eight scholars in geography, urban planning, and agri-food studies from the United States (US) and France engage in a bi-national comparison to deepen our collective understanding of food and land justice. We specifically contextualize land justice as a critical component of food justice in both the US and France in three key areas: access to land for cultivation, urban agriculture, and non-agricultural forms of food provisioning. The US and France are interesting cases to compare, considering the differences and similarities in their colonial and agricultural histories, persistent and systemic race and class-based inequities in land access, and the roles of public bodies and social movements. Read More

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Preserving cultural heritage through the valorization of Cordillera heirloom rice in the Philippines.

Agric Human Values 2021 15;38(1):257-270. Epub 2020 Oct 15.

Agri-food Policy Platform, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), 4031 Los Baños, Laguna Philippines.

For centuries, heirloom rice varieties have been grown on the terraces of the Cordillera Mountains of Luzon, Philippines, known for their significant historical, cultural, and aesthetic values. However, heritage heirloom rice farming is gradually being abandoned, mainly because of its lower productivity and the struggle of the sector to create a sustainable niche market for heirloom rice by branding its cultural, social, and nutritional values. We propose several demand-side intervention strategies for the valorization of heirloom rice. Read More

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October 2020

Growing pains in local food systems: a longitudinal social network analysis on local food marketing in Baltimore County, Maryland and Chester County, Pennsylvania.

Agric Human Values 2021 Feb 22:1-17. Epub 2021 Feb 22.

Department of Human Ecology, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 USA.

Local food systems are growing, and little is known about how the constellation of farms and markets change over time. We trace the evolution of two local food systems (Baltimore County, Maryland and Chester County, Pennsylvania) over six years, including a dataset of over 2690 market connections (edges) between 1520 locations (nodes). Longitudinal social network analysis reveals how the architecture, actor network centrality, magnitude, and spatiality of these supply chains shifted during the 2012-2018 time period. Read More

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February 2021

Correction to: A small Iowa farmer's perspective on COVID-19.

Authors:
Denise O'Brien

Agric Human Values 2021 Jan 15. Epub 2021 Jan 15.

Ames, IA USA.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1007/s10460-020-10084-y.]. Read More

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January 2021

AFHVS 2020 presidential address: pushing beyond the boundaries.

Authors:
Molly D Anderson

Agric Human Values 2021 Jan 6:1-4. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Middlebury College, 202 Robert A. Jones '59 House, Middlebury, VT 05753 USA.

In this 2020 AFHVS Presidential Address, Molly Anderson suggests that we must push beyond the boundaries imposed by our training, institutional reward systems, political system and comfort zones in order to solve global challenges. She lists five challenges facing those who are trying to build more sustainable food systems: overcoming the technocratic and productivist approach of industrial agriculture, avoiding future pandemics, restoring degraded and depleted systems and resources, remaining united as a movement while creating collaborations with other movements, and redistributing power across food system actors so that everyone can realize their human rights, including the right to food. She describes three ways that she has found to be effective in pushing beyond boundaries: international collaborations, interactions with global social movements, and anti-racist work. Read More

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January 2021

Feeding relations: applying Luhmann's operational theory to the food system.

Agric Human Values 2021 Jan 3:1-12. Epub 2021 Jan 3.

Department of International Political Economy, University of Puget Sound, 1500 N. Warner Street, Tacoma, WA 98416 USA.

Current, prevalent models of the food system, including complex-adaptive systems theories and commodity-as-relation thinking, have usefully analyzed the food system in terms of its elements and relationships, confronting persistent questions about a system's identity and leverage points for change. Here, inspired by Heldke's (Monist 101:247-260, 2018) analysis, we argue for another approach to the "system-ness" of food that carries those key questions forward. Drawing on Niklas Luhmann's systems theory, we propose a model of the food system defined by the relational process of feeding itself; that is, the food system is made of feeding and only feeding, and system structures are produced by the coupling of that process to its various contexts. Read More

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January 2021

Palatable disruption: the politics of plant milk.

Agric Human Values 2020 30;37(4):945-962. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QY UK.

Plant-based milk alternatives-or -have surged in popularity over the past ten years. We consider the politics and consumer subjectivities fostered by mylks as part of the broader trend towards 'plant-based' food. We demonstrate how mylk companies inherit and strategically deploy positive framings of milk as wholesome and convenient, as well as negative framings of dairy as environmentally damaging and cruel, to position plant-based as the 'better' alternative. Read More

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January 2020

The invisible labor and multidimensional impacts of negotiating childcare on farms.

Agric Human Values 2020 Oct 14:1-17. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

Independent Scholar, New York, USA.

Social science inquiries of American agriculture have long recognized the inextricability of farm households and farm businesses. Efforts to train and support farmers, however, often privilege business realm indicators over social issues. Such framings implicitly position households as disconnected from farm stress or farm success. Read More

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October 2020

'I will know it when I taste it': trust, food materialities and social media in Chinese alternative food networks.

Authors:
Leigh Martindale

Agric Human Values 2020 Oct 13:1-16. Epub 2020 Oct 13.

62 Rhos Road, Rhos-on-Sea, Conway, LL28 4RY Wales.

Trust is often an assumed outcome of participation in Alternative Food Networks (AFNs) as they directly connect producers with consumers. It is based on this potential for trust "between producers and consumers" that AFNs have emerged as a significant field of food studies analysis as it also suggests a capacity for AFNs to foster associated embedded qualities, like 'morality', 'social justice', 'ecology' and 'equity'. These positive benefits of AFNs, however, cannot be taken for granted as trust is not necessarily an outcome of AFN participation. Read More

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October 2020

Digitalization and the third food regime.

Agric Human Values 2020 Oct 13:1-15. Epub 2020 Oct 13.

Department of Agriculture and Food Policy, Research Group BioMaterialities, Humboldt-Universität Zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

This article asks how the application of digital technologies is changing the organization of the agri-food system in the context of the third food regime. The academic debate on digitalization and food largely focuses on the input and farm level. Yet, based on the analysis of 280 digital services and products, we show that digital technologies are now being used along the entire food commodity chain. Read More

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October 2020

Bridging the rural-urban divide in social innovation transfer: the role of values.

Authors:
Imran Chowdhury

Agric Human Values 2020 Oct 5:1-19. Epub 2020 Oct 5.

Diana Davis Spencer Chair of Social Entrepreneurship, Wheaton College, Norton, MA 02766 USA.

This study examines the process of knowledge transfer between a pair of social enterprises, organizations that are embedded in competing social and economic logics. Drawing on a longitudinal case study of the interaction between social enterprises operating in emerging economy settings, it uncovers factors which influence the transfer of a social innovation from a dense, population-rich setting to one where beneficiaries are geographically dispersed and the costs of service delivery are correspondingly elevated. Evidence from the case study suggests that institutional bricolage-the crafting of improvised solutions in resource-constrained settings-can serve as potent driving force in driving innovation transfer, and that this process of re-combining available resources may be facilitated by the extent to which the values between partner social enterprises are aligned. Read More

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October 2020

Regulating surplus: charity and the legal geographies of food waste enclosure.

Authors:
Joshua D Lohnes

Agric Human Values 2020 Sep 12:1-13. Epub 2020 Sep 12.

Department of Geology and Geography, West Virginia University, 98 Beechurst Ave, Morgantown, WV 26506 USA.

Food charity in the United States has grown into a critical appendage of agro-food supply chains. In 2016, 4.5 billion pounds of food waste was diverted through a network of 200 regional food banks, a fivefold increase in just 20 years. Read More

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September 2020

The power to convene: making sense of the power of food movement organizations in governance processes in the Global North.

Agric Human Values 2020 Aug 31:1-17. Epub 2020 Aug 31.

Department of Political Science, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6 Canada.

Dominant food systems, based on industrial methods and corporate control, are in a state of flux. To enable the transition towards more sustainable and just food systems, food movements are claiming new roles in governance. These movements, and the initiatives they spearhead, are associated with a range of labels (e. Read More

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'Workable utopias' for social change through inclusion and empowerment? Community supported agriculture (CSA) in Wales as social innovation.

Agric Human Values 2020 Aug 18:1-20. Epub 2020 Aug 18.

School of Geography and Planning, Cardiff University, Glamorgan Building, King Edward VII Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3WA Wales UK.

The focus of this article is community supported agriculture (CSA) as an alternative food movement and a bottom-up response to the problems of the dominant food systems. By utilizing social innovation approach that explores the relationship between causes for human needs and emergence of socially innovative food initiatives, the article examines how the CSA projects emerge and why, what is their innovative role as part of the social economy and what is their transformative potential. Based on qualitative data from four different models of CSA case studies in different regions of Wales, UK, and by using concepts from an alternative model for social innovation (ALMOLIN) as analytical tool, the article demonstrates that the Welsh CSA cases play distinctive roles as part of the social economy. Read More

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Organizing for thoughtful food: a meshwork approach.

Agric Human Values 2020 Aug 8:1-11. Epub 2020 Aug 8.

University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB UK.

This paper provides an alternative narrative for organizing food systems. It introduces as a novel theoretical lens to examine the ontological assumptions underlying the shadow and informal dynamics of organizing food. Through a longitudinal qualitative case study, we place relationality and becoming at the centre of organizing food and food systems, demonstrating how entangled relationships can create a complex ontology through the meshwork knots, threads and weave. Read More

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Blended finance for agriculture: exploring the constraints and possibilities of combining financial instruments for sustainable transitions.

Agric Human Values 2020 Jul 27:1-12. Epub 2020 Jul 27.

Clarmondial AG, Zürich, Switzerland.

Transitioning to sustainable agricultural systems is imperative to meet the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Achieving more sustainable agricultural production systems will require significant additional capital, however this cannot be covered by the current financial market setup, which dissociates public and private funders. Blended finance, where concessionary development-oriented funding is used to mobilize additional private capital, is essential. Read More

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Sustainability transitions in the context of pandemic: an introduction to the focused issue on social innovation and systemic impact.

Agric Human Values 2020 Jul 21:1-9. Epub 2020 Jul 21.

Agricultural Information Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China.

For society to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, the agri-food industry needs a substantial toward food systems capable of delivering greater volumes of nutritious food, while simultaneously lowering the environmental footprint. This issue of AHV focuses on the big picture-on mechanisms of sustainability transition, from social innovation, to models of finance and institutional systems, and calls for business and agricultural researchers to transform the sector together. Contributors to this issue embrace a transdisciplinary outlook, including scientific, technical, social and political dimensions of agroecology. Read More

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The COVID-19 pandemic: a systemic analysis.

Authors:
Fritjof Capra

Agric Human Values 2020 Jun 23:1-2. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Center For Ecoliteracy, Berkeley, CA USA.

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Building power through crisis.

Authors:
Saru Jayaraman

Agric Human Values 2020 Jun 16:1-2. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

New York, USA.

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The Covid-19 epidemic: are there lights at the end of the long tunnel?

Authors:
Patrick Holden

Agric Human Values 2020 Jun 10:1-2. Epub 2020 Jun 10.

Sustainable Food Trust, Bristol, UK.

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COVID-19 crisis: time to reflect on how we live and interact with nature.

Authors:
Elizabeth Mpofu

Agric Human Values 2020 Jun 10:1-2. Epub 2020 Jun 10.

Harare, Zimbabwe.

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Who gets to define 'the COVID-19 problem'? Expert politics in a pandemic.

Agric Human Values 2020 Jun 8:1-2. Epub 2020 Jun 8.

Department of Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz, USA.

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Industrial seafood systems in the immobilizing COVID-19 moment.

Agric Human Values 2020 Jun 8:1-2. Epub 2020 Jun 8.

York University, Toronto, Canada.

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COVID-19-does social distancing include species distancing?

Authors:
Undine Giseke

Agric Human Values 2020 Jun 8:1-2. Epub 2020 Jun 8.

Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

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The Arkansas traveler's paradox: COVID-19 and the rural sociology of stupidity.

Authors:
Michael M Bell

Agric Human Values 2020 Jun 4:1-2. Epub 2020 Jun 4.

University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, USA.

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