6,032 results match your criteria Age And Ageing[Journal]


Impact of modifiable healthy lifestyle adoption on lifetime gain from middle to older age.

Age Ageing 2022 May;51(5)

Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

Objective: this study explored whether the modification of selected lifestyles is likely to increase life expectancy from middle age onwards, regardless of the presence of major comorbidities.

Methods: we examined a prospective cohort of 20,373 men and 26,247 women aged 40-80 years. Eight modifiable lifestyle factors were assessed: consumption of fruit, fish and milk, walking and/or sports participation, body-mass index, smoking status, alcohol consumption and sleep duration. Read More

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Brain white matter hyperintensities-predicted age reflects neurovascular health in middle-to-old aged subjects.

Age Ageing 2022 May;51(5)

Institute of Neuroscience, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Background: age-related neurovascular structural and functional impairment is a major aetiology of dementia and stroke in older people. There is no single marker representative of neurovascular biological age yet.

Objective: this study aims to develop and validate a white matter hyperintensities (WMH)-based model for characterising individuals' neurovascular biological age. Read More

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Patterns of lifestyle behaviours from mid- through later-life in relation to exceptional episodic memory performance in older women: the Nurses' Health Study.

Age Ageing 2022 May;51(5)

RUSH Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.

Objectives: to model and compare patterns from mid- to late-life of body mass index (BMI), alternate Mediterranean diet (A-MeDi) and physical activity, between women with exceptional episodic memory over age 80 and cognitively average controls. Our goal was to examine if lifestyle risk factors in early adulthood may be identified which promote exceptional memory status later in life.

Methods: a case-control sample nested within the Nurses' Health Study (initiated in 1976), including 7,557 cognitively healthy participants who survived to age 80 and had a cognitive assessment at 80-87 years. Read More

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Geriatric medicine learning objectives and entrustable professional activities in undergraduate medical curricula: a scoping review.

Age Ageing 2022 May;51(5)

Department of Geriatrics, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Background: entrustable professional activities (EPAs) have become an important component of competency-based medical education. The aim of this study is to evaluate how geriatric medicine learning objectives are addressed by undergraduate medical curricula including EPAs.

Methods: we performed a scoping review following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews guidelines to identify undergraduate medical curricula that include EPAs. Read More

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Clinical trials in older people.

Age Ageing 2022 May;51(5)

University of Helsinki, Department of Medicine, and Helsinki University Hospital, PO Box 340, FI-00029 HUS, Finland.

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) usually provide the best evidence for treatments and management. Historically, older people have often been excluded from clinical medication trials due to age, multimorbidity and disabilities. The situation is improving, but still the external validity of many trials may be questioned. Read More

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Interventions to reduce falls in hospitals: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Age Ageing 2022 May;51(5)

John Walsh Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Northern Sydney Local Health District and The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Background: Falls remain a common and debilitating problem in hospitals worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of falls prevention interventions on falls rates and the risk of falling in hospital.

Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Read More

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Frailty indices based on self-report, blood-based biomarkers and examination-based data in the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging.

Age Ageing 2022 May;51(5)

Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Background: Frailty can be operationalised using the deficit accumulation approach, which considers health deficits across multiple domains. We aimed to develop, validate and compare three different frailty indices (FI) constructed from self-reported health measures (FI-Self Report), blood-based biomarkers (FI-Blood) and examination-based assessments (FI-Examination).

Methods: Up to 30,027 participants aged 45-85 years from the baseline (2011-2015) comprehensive cohort of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging were included in the analyses. Read More

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Comprehensive geriatric assessment in older people: an umbrella review of health outcomes.

Age Ageing 2022 May;51(5)

Department of Interdisciplinary Medicine, University of Bari "Aldo Moro", Bari, Italy.

Background: Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) has been in use for the last three decades. However, some doubts remain regarding its clinical use. Therefore, we aimed to capture the breadth of outcomes reported and assess the strength of evidence of the use of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) for health outcomes in older persons. Read More

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Antibody response with SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccine (CoronaVac) in Turkish geriatric population.

Age Ageing 2022 May;51(5)

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Background: Sars-CoV-2 infection influences older individuals at the forefront, and there is still limited data on the COVID-19 vaccine response in the geriatric population. This study aimed to assess antibody response after vaccination with SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccine and examine possible factors affecting this response in a geriatric population.

Methods: individuals who have been on at least the 28th day after the second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine were included. Read More

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'Oncological trials-designed for result or clinical relevance?'

Age Ageing 2022 May;51(5)

Department of Geriatric Medicine, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin 4, Republic of Ireland.

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Mobility screening for fall prediction in the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA): implications for fall prevention in the decade of healthy ageing.

Age Ageing 2022 May;51(5)

Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Guidelines for fall prevention in older adults recommend mobility screening for fall risk assessment; however, there is no consensus on which test to use and at what cutoff. This study aimed to determine the accuracy and optimal cut-off values of commonly used mobility tests for predicting falls in the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA).

Methods: Mobility tests at baseline included the Timed Up and Go (TUG), Single Leg Stance (SLS), chair-rise and gait speed. Read More

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Kidney transplantation or dialysis in older adults-an interview study on the decision-making process.

Age Ageing 2022 May 3. Epub 2022 May 3.

Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Department of Nephrology, 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands.

Background: In older patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), the choice between kidney transplantation (KT) and dialysis may be more complex than in younger patients because of a higher prevalence of comorbidities and frailty. This study aims to provide greater insight into the current decision-making process by exploring the expectations, experiences, and health outcome priorities of all stakeholders.

Methods: We performed semi-structured interviews with patients ≥65 years with ESKD (eGFR <15 mL/min/1. Read More

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COVID-19 risk factors amongst 14,786 care home residents: an observational longitudinal analysis including daily community positive test rates of COVID-19, hospital stays and vaccination status in Wales (UK) between 1 September 2020 and 1 May 2021.

Age Ageing 2022 May;51(5)

Swansea University, Wales, UK.

Background: COVID-19 vaccinations have been prioritised for high risk individuals.

Aim: Determine individual-level risk factors for care home residents testing positive for SARS-CoV-2.

Study Design: Longitudinal observational cohort study using individual-level linked data from the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) databank. Read More

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Geriatric conditions and healthcare utilisation in older adults living with HIV.

Age Ageing 2022 May;51(5)

Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Background: older HIV-positive adults experience a significant burden of geriatric conditions. However, little is known about the association between geriatric conditions and healthcare utilisation in this population.

Setting: outpatient safety-net HIV clinic in San Francisco. Read More

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Effectiveness of acute geriatric unit care on functional decline, clinical and process outcomes among hospitalised older adults with acute medical complaints: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

School of Allied Health, Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, Ageing Research Centre, Health Research Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.

Background: the aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to update and synthesise the totality of research evidence on the effectiveness of acute geriatric unit (AGU) care for older adults admitted to hospital with acute medical complaints.

Methods: MEDLINE, CINAHL, CENTRAL and Embase databases were systematically searched from 2008 to February 2022. Screening, data extraction and quality grading were undertaken by two reviewers. Read More

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Effect of frailty on outcomes of endovascular treatment for acute ischaemic stroke in older patients.

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

Healthy Ageing Programme, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Alexandra Hospital, Singapore, Singapore.

Background: frailty has been shown to be a better predictor of clinical outcomes than age alone across many diseases. Few studies have examined the relationship between frailty, stroke and stroke interventions such as endovascular thrombectomy (EVT).

Objective: we aimed to investigate the impact of frailty measured by clinical frailty scale (CFS) on clinical outcomes after EVT for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) in older patients ≥70 years. Read More

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Effect of an ongoing pharmacist service to reduce medicine-induced deterioration and adverse reactions in aged-care facilities (nursing homes): a multicentre, randomised controlled trial (the ReMInDAR trial).

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

Quality Use of Medicines and Pharmacy Research Centre, UniSA Clinical and Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led intervention using validated tools to reduce medicine-induced deterioration and adverse reactions.

Design And Setting: Multicenter, open-label parallel randomised controlled trial involving 39 Australian aged-care facilities.

Participants: Residents on ≥4 medicines or ≥1 anticholinergic or sedative medicine. Read More

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New horizons in evidence-based care for older people: individual participant data meta-analysis.

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

AGE Research Group, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK.

Evidence-based decisions on clinical and cost-effectiveness of interventions are ideally informed by meta-analyses of intervention trial data. However, when undertaken, such meta-analyses in ageing research have typically been conducted using standard methods whereby summary (aggregate) data are extracted from published trial reports. Although meta-analysis of aggregate data can provide useful insights into the average effect of interventions within a selected trial population, it has limitations regarding robust conclusions on which subgroups of people stand to gain the greatest benefit from an intervention or are at risk of experiencing harm. Read More

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Refashioning the uneasy relationship between older people and geriatric medicine.

Authors:
Desmond O'Neill

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

Medical Gerontology, Centre for Ageing, Neuroscience and the Humanities, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, D24 NR0A, Ireland.

A notable feature of most medical specialties is close joint working between patient advocacy groups and specialist societies in furthering improvements in policy and services. While growing old is not a disease, nor too is being a child, and the engagement of advocacy and international bodies such as UNICEF with paediatricians is well established and recognised. Yet almost eight decades after the founding of geriatric medicine, it is clear that this type of relationship does not hold for the advocacy bodies representing those we serve, as well as the wider constituency of older people. Read More

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Characteristics of older-patient-specif ic oncological trials: a cross-sectional analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov.

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

Cancer Center, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China.

Background: clinical trials dedicated to the older patients with cancer are essential to help to define optimal cancer therapy for this rapidly growing population. Our study aimed to analyse the characteristics and the evolution of older-patient-specific oncological trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov. Read More

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Erectile dysfunction predicts mortality in middle-aged and older men independent of their sex steroid status.

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

Department of Chronic Diseases and Metabolism, KU Leuven, Laboratory of Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology, Leuven, Belgium.

Background: erectile dysfunction is associated with mortality, whereas the association between low testosterone (T) and higher mortality remains controversial. Sexual dysfunction and low T often coexist, but the relative importance of sexual symptoms versus low T in predicting mortality is not known. We studied the interrelationships between sex steroids and sexual symptoms with all-cause mortality in a large prospective cohort of European men. Read More

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Mandatory vaccination against COVID-19 for health and social care workers caring for older people.

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

Department of Medical Humanities, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

The COVID-19 pandemic has particularly adversely affected older people with frailty and functional dependency. Essential regular contact with care staff has been evidenced as an important source of infection for this group. Vaccinating care staff can reduce the incidence, duration and severity of infection, preventing onward transmission to older people and minimising the harm associated with discontinuity caused by staff absence. Read More

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New national osteoporosis guidance-implications for geriatricians.

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

Cambridge Biomedical Campus, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0AH, UK.

Fragility fractures are painful, debilitating, often life-changing and accounted for an estimated 2.4% of pre-pandemic health care spending in the UK. Those who are older, frail and multimorbid have the highest fracture risk and therefore the most to gain from anti-osteoporosis treatments to reduce this risk. Read More

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New horizons in Type 2 myocardial infarction: pathogenesis, assessment and management of an emerging geriatric disease.

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

Service de Médecine Interne Gériatrie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Dijon Bourgogne, 21000 Dijon, France.

Type 2 myocardial infarction (MI) is characterised by a functional imbalance between myocardial oxygen supply and demand in the absence of a thrombotic process, leading to myocardial necrosis. This type of MI was relatively unknown among clinicians until the third universal definition of MI was published in 2017, differentiating Type 2 from Type 1 MI, which follows an acute atherothrombotic event. The pathogenesis, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of Type 2 MI are described in the present review. Read More

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Inspiratory muscle training in addition to whole body vibration for functional and physical outcomes in pre-frail older women: a randomized controlled trial.

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

Postgraduate Program of Biology Applied to Health, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil.

Background: to investigate the efficacy of addition of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) to the whole body vibration (WBV) on functional outcomes, physical performance, muscle strength and metabolism in pre-frail older women.

Methods: this study was a randomized double-blind trial. Forty-two older women aged 60-80 years who meet the Cardiovascular Health Study frailty criteria for pre-frailty were randomly allocated to IMT + WBV, IMTsham + WBV or Sham groups. Read More

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Lifetime serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 25(OH) is associated with hand grip strengths: insight from a Mendelian randomisation.

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

Institute of Life Course and Medical Sciences, Department of Musculoskeletal and Ageing Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L7 8TX, UK.

Clinical trials have suggested that increased 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) has positive effect on hand grip strength. This Mendelian randomisation (MR) was implemented using summary-level data from the largest genome-wide association studies on vitamin D (n = 73,699) and hand grip strength. Inverse variance weighted method (IVW) was used to estimate the causal estimates. Read More

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Association of Tai Chi exercise with physical and neurocognitive functions, frailty, quality of life and mortality in older adults: Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study.

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

Department of Psychological Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.

Background: real-world observations on the long-term benefits of Tai Chi (TC) exercise, in terms of physical and cognitive functioning, frailty, quality of life (QOL) and mortality are lacking.

Methods: prospective cohort study participants were community-dwelling adults aged 55+, including 5,407 non-frequent TC participants (<1x/week) and 572 frequent TC participants (≥1x/week). Outcome measures at baseline and 3-5 years follow-up included physical performance (Knee Extension Strength, POMA Balance and Gait, Timed-up-and-go, Gait Speed) and neurocognitive performance (attention and working memory, visual-motor tracking and mental flexibility, verbal learning and memory, visual memory, spatial and constructional ability), Frailty Index ≥0. Read More

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Care of the older trauma patient following low-energy transfer trauma-highlighting a research void.

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

Background: in high-income countries trauma patients are becoming older, more likely to have comorbidities, and are being injured by low-energy mechanisms. This systematic review investigates the association between higher-level trauma centre care and outcomes of adult patients who were admitted to hospital due to injuries sustained following low-energy trauma.

Methods: a systematic review was conducted in January 2021. Read More

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Healthcare for older people in lower and middle income countries.

Authors:
Maw Pin Tan

Age Ageing 2022 Apr;51(4)

Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia.

Two-thirds of the world's population aged 60 years and over will reside in lower and middle income countries (LMIC) by 2050. Many LMICs are experiencing rapid population ageing at a faster rate than in Western Europe and North America, but may not have the resources to respond to the World Health Organization's call to action. As population ageing is a global issue, effective and sustainable global solutions are much needed. Read More

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