15 results match your criteria African Affairs[Journal]

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Sexual minorities, human rights and public health strategies in Africa.

Authors:
Marc Epprecht

Afr Aff (Lond) 2012 ;111(443):223-43

Queen's University, Kingston, Canada.

Remarkable progress has been made towards the recognition of sexual minority rights in Africa. At the same time, a marked increase in attacks, rhetorical abuse, and restrictive legislation against sexual minorities or ‘homosexuality’ makes activism for sexual rights a risky endeavour in many African countries. Campaigns for sexual rights and ‘coming out’ are frequently perceived as a form of Western cultural imperialism, leading to an exportation of Western gay identities and provoking a patriotic defensiveness. Read More

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October 2012

Whores, men, and other misfits: undoing ‘feminization’ in the armed forces in the DRC.

Afr Aff (Lond) 2011 ;110(441):563-85

Gothenburg University.

The global attention focused on sexual violence in the DRC has not only contributed to an image of the Congolese army as a vestige of pre-modern barbarism, populated by rapists, and bearing no resemblance to the world of modern armies; it has also shaped gender and defence reform initiatives. These initiatives have become synonymous with combating sexual violence, reflecting an assumption that the gendered dynamics of the army are already known. Crucial questions such as the ‘feminization’ of the armed forces are consequently neglected. Read More

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October 2012

Zimbabwean farmers in Nigeria: exceptional farmers or spectacular support?

Afr Aff (Lond) 2011 ;110(441):535-61

St Antony's College, University of Oxford.

Since 2004, white commercial farmers displaced under Zimbabwe's fast-track land reform programme have established new successful farms near the central Nigerian town of Shonga. This article explores the basis of that success. It addresses three key questions: (1) What has actually happened near Shonga since 2004? (2) What or who is driving the process of agrarian transformation? And (3) What are the long-term consequences for the peasantry since Nigerian agriculture is still largely peasant-based? It argues that contrary to popular myths of ‘enterprising’ white Zimbabwean farmers, the process is driven by a complex group of actors, including the national and regional states. Read More

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October 2012

Biomedical loopholes, distrusted state, and the politics of HIV/AIDS "cure" in Nigeria.

Afr Aff (Lond) 2011 ;110(439):191-211

University of Kansas, Lawrence.

As socio-medical phenomena, epidemics are revealing of the cultures in which they are experienced. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Africa exposes antecedent tensions between state and society, and, on a broader canvas, between the global north and south. As a contribution to the emerging literature on the social ramifications of HIV/AIDS, this article examines the saga of the Nigerian physician and immunologist, Dr Jeremiah Abalaka, who like other innovators in sub-Saharan Africa claims to have developed a curative HIV vaccine. Read More

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September 2011
4 Reads

Diaspora, faith, and science: building a Mouride hospital in Senegal.

Afr Aff (Lond) 2011 ;110(438):75-95

Clark University.

This article examines a development initiative spearheaded by the members of a transnational diaspora – the creation of a medical hospital in the holy city of Touba in central Senegal. Although the construction of the hospital is decidedly a philanthropic project, Hôpital Matlaboul Fawzaini is better understood as part of the larger place-making project of the Muridiyya and the pursuit of symbolic capital by a particular Mouride "dahira". The "dahira's" project illuminates important processes of forging global connections and transnational localities, and underscores the importance of understanding the complex motivations behind diaspora development. Read More

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March 2011
1 Read

The Africanization of poverty: a retrospective on "Make Poverty History".

Authors:
Graham Harrison

Afr Aff (Lond) 2010 ;109(436):391-408

This article explores the ways in which the British campaign coalition Make Poverty History represented Africa throughout 2005. Focusing particularly on the G8 Gleneagles summit, Make Poverty History (MPH) asserted a series of justice claims which had no geographical reference. Nevertheless, as a result of internal tensions within the coalition, and especially as a result of the ways in which MPH interacted with other political agencies as the summit approached, MPH's messages became increasingly interpolated by references to Africa as a result of the emergence of government, media, and celebrity involvement. Read More

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December 2010

Spirits and social reconstruction after mass violence: rethinking transitional justice.

Authors:
Erin Baines

Afr Aff (Lond) 2010 ;109(436):409-30

Liu Institute for Global Issues, University of British Columbia.

A vibrant debate in the field of transitional justice concerns the relative ability of global, national, and local mechanisms to promote justice after violent conflict. Discussion largely focuses on more formal mechanisms of justice (courts, tribunals, or truth commissions), implying that state institutions and the law are solely responsible for shaping the process of social healing. This article suggests that scholars should take seriously more informal, socio-cultural processes outside the purview of the state, particularly for how they promote social reconstruction at the micro level. Read More

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September 2010

Colonial bones: the 2006 burial of Savorgnan de Brazza in the Congo.

Afr Aff (Lond) 2010 ;109(436):367-90

University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The Franco-Congolese agreement to enshrine the corpse of Pierre Savorgnan de Brazza in a grand memorial tomb in Brazzaville (2006) has been decried by many observers as neo-colonial farce. This article interprets France's agenda to propose a "suave reconquest" of its former colonies, and Sassou Nguesso's forceful mobilization of national and regional support. Beyond the immediate political significance of the episode, however, the article proposes new ideas on the ways in which modern states, North and South, depend on "tournaments of value" that assign polarized worth to persons, and often back up international deals with transactions in sanctified human remains. Read More

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September 2010
2 Reads

Unfinished agendas: writing the history of medicine in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Authors:
M Malowany

Afr Aff (Lond) 2000 ;99(395):325-49

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El negro, el nino, witchcraft and the absence of rain in Botswana.

Authors:
J Gewald

Afr Aff (Lond) 2001 ;100(401):555-80

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Can the Ethiopian change his skin? The Beta Israel (Ethiopian Jews) and racial discourse.

Authors:
S Kaplan

Afr Aff (Lond) 1999 ;98(393):535-50

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March 2009
2 Reads

Spirit possession and healing in modern Zambia: an analysis of letters to Archbishop Milingo.

Authors:
G T Haar S Ellis

Afr Aff (Lond) 1988 ;87(347):185-206

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December 1990

Nigeria 1956-65: a medical memoir.

Authors:
U Maclean

Afr Aff (Lond) 1984 ;83(333):543-66

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November 1988
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