405 results match your criteria Advances in psychosomatic medicine[Journal]


Joint hypermobility, anxiety and psychosomatics: two and a half decades of progress toward a new phenotype.

Adv Psychosom Med 2015 30;34:143-57. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Departament de Psiquiatria i Medicina Legal Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra Barcelona, Spain.

The strong association between a heritable collagen condition and anxiety was an unexpected finding that we first described in 1988 at the Hospital del Mar in Barcelona. Since then, several clinical and nonclinical studies have been carried out. In this paper, after summarizing the concept and diagnosis of joint hypermobility (hyperlaxity), we review case-control studies in both directions (anxiety in joint hypermobility and joint hypermobility in anxiety disorders) as well as studies on nonclinical samples, review papers and one incidence study. Read More

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https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/369113
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000369113DOI Listing
June 2015
5 Reads

Huntington's disease: looking beyond the movement disorder.

Authors:
Mary K Morreale

Adv Psychosom Med 2015 30;34:135-42. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Mich., USA.

Although Huntington's disease is classically considered a motor disease, psychiatric, behavioral, and cognitive symptoms are often presenting signs of illness. Even in isolation, these comorbidities can lead to impairment in function and significant distress for patients and their families. Intended for treating psychiatrists, this review discusses the clinical presentation and treatment of Huntington's disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000369111DOI Listing
June 2015
1 Read

Psychodermatology.

Adv Psychosom Med 2015 30;34:123-34. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

University of Arizona, College of Medicine, Tucson, Ariz., USA.

Psychodermatology is an underappreciated field that studies psychocutaneous disorders, which are conditions that have both dermatologic and psychiatric characteristics. Underlying psychiatric comorbidity is estimated to occur in up to one-third of dermatologic patients, and psychiatric illness may either be the cause or the consequence of dermatologic disease. Psychodermatologic patients lack insight and often do not recognize a psychiatric etiology for their symptoms and therefore comprise some of the most challenging cases to treat. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000369090DOI Listing
June 2015
22 Reads

Coping with losses, grief, and mourning in prostate cancer.

Authors:
Daniela Wittmann

Adv Psychosom Med 2015 30;34:109-22. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., USA.

Prostate cancer is a highly prevalent disease with a high likelihood of survival. If treated, survivors live with significant and lasting treatment-related side effects. Surgical treatment is associated with urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, and radiation leads to urinary and bowel irritability as well as erectile dysfunction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000369089DOI Listing

Telomeres, early-life stress and mental illness.

Adv Psychosom Med 2015 30;34:92-108. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Mood Disorders Research Program and Laboratory for Clinical and Translational Neuroscience, Butler Hospital, Providence, R.I., USA.

Telomeres are structures of tandem TTAGGG repeats that are found at the ends of chromosomes and preserve genomic DNA by serving as a disposable buffer to protect DNA termini during chromosome replication. In this process, the telomere itself shortens with each cell division and can consequently be thought of as a cellular 'clock', reflecting the age of a cell and the time until senescence. Telomere shortening and changes in the levels of telomerase, the enzyme that maintains telomeres, occur in the context of certain somatic diseases and in response to selected physical stressors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000369088DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4476498PMC
June 2015
5 Reads

Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome: management issues.

Authors:
Julius Bourke

Adv Psychosom Med 2015 30;34:78-91. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Centre for Psychiatry at The Wolfson Institute for Preventive Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, UK.

Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome represent two of the most commonly encountered functional somatic syndromes in clinical practice. Both have been contentious diagnoses in the past, and this diagnostic dispute has resulted in a therapeutic nihilism that has been of great detriment to their management and to alleviation of the intense suffering and disability that they have caused their innumerable sufferers. A new age has dawned in terms of a better understanding of these syndromes' physiology and improved approaches to their management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000369087DOI Listing

Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue: the underlying biology and related theoretical issues.

Adv Psychosom Med 2015 30;34:61-77. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Stress, Psychiatry and Immunology Laboratory, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK.

There is an increasing interest in understanding the biological mechanism underpinning fibromyalgia (FM) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Despite the presence of mixed findings in this area, a few biological systems have been consistently involved, and the increasing number of studies in the field is encouraging. This chapter will focus on inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways and on the neuroendocrine system, which have been more commonly examined. Read More

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https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/369085
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000369085DOI Listing
June 2015
7 Reads

Then and now … HIV consultation psychiatry update.

Adv Psychosom Med 2015 30;34:49-60. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Neurological Institute, Neurological Center for Pain, Department of Psychiatry & Psychology, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Over the last 2 decades, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) illness has transformed to a chronic disease model. However, challenges, including the effects of co-morbid illnesses and the challenge of preventing future spread of the disease, continue to confront those infected with HIV. Addictions remain an important problem and a serious contributor to overall morbidity and mortality in this population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000369839DOI Listing
June 2015
2 Reads

Forensic issues in medical evaluation: competency and end-of-life issues.

Adv Psychosom Med 2015 30;34:36-48. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Northcoast Behavioral Healthcare, Northfield, Ohio, USA.

Decision-making capacity is a common reason for psychiatric consultation that is likely to become more common as the population ages. Capacity assessments are frequently compromised by misconceptions, such as the belief that incapacity is permanent or that patients with dementia categorically lack capacity. This chapter will review the conceptual framework of decision-making capacity and discuss its application to medical decision-making. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000369083DOI Listing
June 2015
2 Reads

Dimensional psychopharmacology in somatising patients.

Adv Psychosom Med 2015 30;34:24-35. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Despite the recent DSM-5 review of somatoform disorders, which are now called somatic symptom and related disorders, the categorical definitions of these syndromes have inherent limitations because their causal mechanism or presumed aetiologies are still unknown. These limitations may affect everyday clinical practice and decision-making abilities. As a result, physicians have limited information at their disposal to treat these patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000369082DOI Listing

Communication with patients suffering from serious physical illness.

Adv Psychosom Med 2015 30;34:10-23. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy.

Communication is the corner stone of the relationship with the patient in all medical settings with the main aims of creating a good inter-personal relationship, exchanging information, and making treatment-related decisions. In a rapidly changing cultural and social context, the paternalistic approach of doctors knowing the best and deciding what should be done for a patient has been replaced by a shared decision-making approach, with patients being advised to educate themselves, ask questions and influence the course of the discussion with their doctors. Thus, a need for an improvement in the communication skills of physicians is extremely important for patients affected by serious physical illness (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000369050DOI Listing
June 2015
14 Reads

Psychosomatic medicine in the 21st century: understanding mechanisms and barriers to utilization.

Adv Psychosom Med 2015 30;34:1-9. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Departments of Psychiatry at Inova Fairfax Hospital, Johns Hopkins University, George Washington University, and Virginia Commonwealth University, Falls Church, Va., USA.

The psychosomatic approach arose in antiquity as mankind looked for explanations for illness and death. With the rise of modern medicine, the links between emotions and medical conditions, such as cardiac disease and diabetes, were described by astute clinical observers, but the mechanisms for these conditions were based on correlation from observations rather than on experimental design. Psychoanalytic theory was often utilized to explain many common diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000369043DOI Listing
June 2015
3 Reads

Epilogue.

Adv Psychosom Med 2013 25;33:123-9. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minn., USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000349900DOI Listing
December 2013
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Bioethical dimensions of cultural psychosomatics: the need for an ethical research approach.

Authors:
Fernando Lolas

Adv Psychosom Med 2013 25;33:115-22. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital, Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.

Contemporary psychosomatics is a research-based technical discipline and its social power depends on how scientific knowledge is obtained and applied in practice, considering cultural contexts. This article presents the view that the dialogical principles on which bioethical discourse is based are more inclusive than professional ethics and philosophical reflection. The distinction is advanced between rule-guided behavior and norm-justifiable acts (substantiation and justification). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000348807DOI Listing
December 2013

Cultural psychiatry: research strategies and future directions.

Adv Psychosom Med 2013 25;33:97-114. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Que, Canada.

This chapter reviews some key aspects of current research in cultural psychiatry and explores future prospects. The first section discusses the multiple meanings of culture in the contemporary world and their relevance for understanding mental health and illness. The next section considers methodological strategies for unpacking the concept of culture and studying the impact of cultural variables, processes and contexts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000348742DOI Listing
December 2013
6 Reads

Ethnopsychopharmacology and pharmacogenomics.

Authors:
Hernán Silva

Adv Psychosom Med 2013 25;33:88-96. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile and Biomedical Neuroscience Institute (BNI), Santiago, Chile.

Significant differences in response to psychotropic drugs are observed in various ethnic and cultural groups. Ethnopsychiatry is the study of how culture and genetic differences in human groups determine and influence the response to psychotropic agents. Meanwhile, pharmacogenomics studies the influence of genetic variations in the response of patients to different drugs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000348741DOI Listing
December 2013

Culture and demoralization in psychotherapy.

Adv Psychosom Med 2013 25;33:75-87. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn., USA.

In most societies, members of a culture have attempted to help each other in times of trouble with various types of healing methods. Demoralization - an individual experience related to a group phenomenon - responds to certain elements shared by all psychotherapies. This article has three objectives: (1) to review the theoretical background leading to our current views on culture and demoralization in psychotherapy, (2) to discuss the methodological challenges faced in the cross-cultural study of demoralization and psychotherapy, and (3) to describe the clinical applications and research prospects of this area of inquiry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000348735DOI Listing
December 2013
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Transcultural aspects of somatic symptoms in the context of depressive disorders.

Adv Psychosom Med 2013 25;33:64-74. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

Office of Global Health, UMDNJ - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, N.J., USA.

Somatic symptoms are a common presentation of mental disorders or psychological distress worldwide, and may often coexist with depressive and anxiety symptoms, thus accounting for what might be the most frequent psychiatric syndrome in primary care. Indeed, physical symptoms accompanying the clinical presentations of a variety of mental disorders may be considered as universal 'idioms of distress' that may vary across cultures, depending on attitudes and explanations embedded in each one of them. These variations in symptom presentations are the result of various interacting factors that ultimately determine how individuals identify and classify bodily sensations, perceive illness, and seek medical attention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000350057DOI Listing
December 2013

Cultural psychiatry in the French-speaking world.

Adv Psychosom Med 2013 25;33:56-63. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Mental Health Service, Minneapolis VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minn., USA.

For the last five centuries, France's international influence has been constant. This has been particularly evident in the areas of general culture, history and science. In psychiatry, the role of Pinel during the French Revolution, and the discovery of the first psychotropic agent, chlorpromazine, by Delay and Deniker are two outstanding historical facts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000348733DOI Listing
December 2013

Opening up mental health service delivery to cultural diversity: current situation, development and examples from three northern European countries.

Adv Psychosom Med 2013 25;33:40-55. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

Transcultural Centre, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.

There are inequalities in health among migrants and local populations in Europe. Due to migration, Germany, Norway and Sweden have become ethnic culturally diverse nations. There are barriers to mental health care access for refugees, migrants and minorities, and problems with quality of culturally sensitive care in the three countries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000348730DOI Listing
December 2013

Trends in cultural psychiatry in the United kingdom.

Authors:
Kamaldeep Bhui

Adv Psychosom Med 2013 25;33:31-9. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.

Cultural psychiatry in the United Kingdom exhibits unique characteristics closely related to its history as a colonial power, its relationship with Commonwealth countries and the changing socio-demographic characteristics of its diverse population throughout the centuries. It is not surprising, therefore, that the emergence of this discipline was centred around issues of race and religion. After a brief historical review of the development of cultural psychiatry and the mention of pioneering intellectual and academic figures, as well as the evolvement of the field in organizations such as the Royal College of Psychiatrists, this chapter examines the need of a critical cultural psychiatry, more than a narrative social science distanced from the realities of clinical practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000348727DOI Listing
December 2013

Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

Adv Psychosom Med 2013 25;33:15-30. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

Columbia University Department of Psychiatry, New York, N.Y., USA.

Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000348725DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4441039PMC
December 2013
3 Reads

Cultural psychiatry: a general perspective.

Adv Psychosom Med 2013 25;33:1-14. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minn., USA.

The current scene in the field of cultural psychiatry shows a vigorous growth, multifaceted conceptual and research developments and more relevant clinical presence. After a pertinent definition of the discipline, this chapter examines the contribution of cultural psychiatry to the etiopathogenesis of mental disorders, to the variations of clinical presentations in numerous entities, to psychiatric diagnosis and treatment and to the relatively unexplored rubric of preventive psychiatry. Advanced concepts of neurosciences and technology-based research can find a place in the realm of biocultural correlates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000348722DOI Listing
December 2013
1 Read

General and specialized medicine and psychiatry.

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 ;32:VII

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January 2012
2 Reads

Relational ethics and psychosomatic assessment.

Authors:
António Barbosa

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 19;32:223-39. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Center for Bioethics, University of Lisbon, and Psychiatry Department, Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, Portugal.

The main ethical perspective in the clinical relationship takes into consideration the vulnerability of the clinical condition before threats and risks that can undermine the integrity and dignity of the person. Psychosomatic medicine faces complex cases whose ethical problems cannot only be solved by applying top-down deontological or utilitarian approaches, principlism, which is limited mainly to easing ethical tensions, or a bottom-up approach, the casuistic model, case-based reasoning. In introducing vulnerability as the core of ethical questioning as a principle ontological priority over other principles, relational ethics refers to the appreciation of the responsibility of health professionals through which a health care professional and the patient 'together' can construct more reasonable and prudential courses of action with, for, and by the patient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330039DOI Listing
January 2012
1 Read

Family assessment in the medical setting.

Authors:
Gabor I Keitner

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 19;32:203-22. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Rhode Island and Miriam Hospitals, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.

Acute and chronic illness exists in a social context. A biopsychosocial assessment should include an evaluation of the patient's social situation, the nature of the patient's interpersonal connections, and his/her family's functioning. Families can influence health by direct biological pathways, health behavior pathways, and psychophysiological pathways. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330037DOI Listing
January 2012

Assessment of psychological well-being in psychosomatic medicine.

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 19;32:182-202. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

The measures of disease status alone are insufficient to describe the burden of illness or one's attitudes toward illness and life. The subjective health status including psychological resources and well-being is as valid as that of the clinician when it comes to evaluating outcomes. The aim of this chapter is to provide a theoretical framework for the assessment of psychological well-being and positive functioning and to review the literature supporting the influence of these positive dimensions on illness development and health protection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330021DOI Listing
January 2012
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Illness behavior.

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 19;32:160-81. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Laboratory of Psychosomatics and Clinimetrics, Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

The term illness behavior was introduced by Mechanic and Volkart to describe the individuals' different ways to respond to their own health status. Pilowsky's concept of abnormal illness behavior encompasses several clinical conditions characterized by a maladaptive mode of experiencing, perceiving, evaluating and responding to one's own health status. The concept of somatization was criticized because it implies the presence of psychological distress or an underlying psychiatric disturbance when an organic cause for somatic symptoms is not found. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330015DOI Listing
January 2012
3 Reads

Assessment of personality in psychosomatic medicine: current concepts.

Authors:
Fiammetta Cosci

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 19;32:133-59. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Department of Psychology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.

The notion that personality variables can affect vulnerability to specific diseases has been widely promoted in psychosomatic medicine. Over the time, some personality patterns have been extensively studied. Among them, alexithymia, type A, and type D personality are the most relevant. Read More

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https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/330014
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330014DOI Listing
January 2012
2 Reads

Mood and anxiety in the medically ill.

Authors:
Per Bech

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 19;32:118-32. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Psychiatric Research Unit, Mental Health Centre North Zealand, University of Copenhagen, Hillerød, Denmark.

In this review on rating scales for anxiety and depression, only instruments considered to be quantifiable, analogue to the measurement of hypertension in the medical setting, have been selected. The clinimetric method for validating these rating scales is the item response theory model in which the individual items are rank ordered on the dimensions of anxiety or depression, resulting in their total score being a sufficient statistic. The measurement of anxiety and mood on their respective dimensions of severity implies that we can speak of primary and secondary anxiety or depression in the same way as we speak about primary hypertension (without a medical explanation) and secondary hypertension (when caused be various medical conditions). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330012DOI Listing
January 2012
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Psychological factors in medical disorders assessed with the diagnostic criteria for psychosomatic research.

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 19;32:108-17. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Psychosomatic Unit, IRCCS De Bellis Hospital, Castellana Grotte, Italy.

The Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR) are a diagnostic and conceptual framework that aims to translate psychosocial variables that derived from psychosomatic research into operational tools whereby individual patients could be identified. A set of 12 syndromes was developed and grouped in the clusters of abnormal illness behavior (health anxiety, disease phobia, thanatophobia, and illness denial), somatization (functional somatic symptoms secondary to a psychiatric disorder, persistent somatization, conversion symptoms, and anniversary reaction), irritability (type A behavior, irritable mood), demoralization, and alexithymia. This chapter aims to illustrate the criteria for each of the 12 DCPR syndromes and how to diagnose them with the aid of the DCPR Structured Interview, as illustrated in a clinical example. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330009DOI Listing
January 2012
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Assessment of sexual function in the medically ill: psychosomatic approach to sexual functioning.

Authors:
Richard Balon

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 19;32:97-107. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, and Anesthesiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA.

Good sexual functioning is a part of overall well-being. Assessment of sexual functioning should be part of any complete psychosomatic assessment. The cornerstone of this assessment is a comprehensive clinical interview of the patient, with, if possible, collateral information obtained from the partner or another clinician. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330008DOI Listing
January 2012

Assessment of lifestyle in relation to health.

Authors:
Elena Tomba

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 19;32:72-96. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Laboratory of Psychosomatics and Clinimetrics, Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Habits relevant to health include physical activities, diet, smoking, drinking and drug consumption. Despite the fact that benefits of modifying lifestyle are increasingly demonstrated in clinical and general populations, assessment of lifestyle and therapeutic lifestyle changes is neglected in practice. In this review, associations between unhealthy lifestyle and health outcomes are presented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330007DOI Listing
January 2012

Evaluating life events and chronic stressors in relation to health: stressors and health in clinical work.

Authors:
Töres Theorell

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 19;32:58-71. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Institute for Stress Research, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.

Despite the fact that there is an extensive scientific literature regarding the importance of exposure to psychosocial stressors, the assessment of such stressors is often neglected in clinical work. The present review summarizes the scientific literature on critical life changes and work-related stressors. Particular emphasis has been on somatic outcomes and physiological processes that have been shown to be affected by exposure to stressors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330004DOI Listing
January 2012
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Evaluating childhood adversity.

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 19;32:35-57. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Capital and Coast District Health Board, University of Otago Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand.

Childhood adversity increases risk of psychological and physical disorders. The comprehensive psychosomatic assessment of an individual's vulnerability to illness includes the evaluation of early life events, especially exposure to physical, emotional, sexual abuse and neglect. Many self-report and observer-rated instruments are now available to aid this evaluation and increase its validity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330002DOI Listing
January 2012
3 Reads

The psychosomatic interview.

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 19;32:19-34. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Department of Psychiatry, Inova Health Systems, Falls Church, VA 22042-3300, USA.

The psychosomatic interview is a patient-focused dialogue between physician and patient. It differs from the traditional disease-focused encounter in that the psychosomatic approach includes the biological, psychological, and sociocultural domains irrespective of the patients initial complaint, whether somatic or psychological. The process of dyadic interaction and the techniques of open questions are reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330001DOI Listing
January 2012
5 Reads

Principles of psychosomatic assessment.

Adv Psychosom Med 2012 19;32:1-18. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Laboratory of Psychosomatics and Clinimetrics, Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

There is increasing awareness of the limitations of disease as the primary focus of medical care. It is not that certain disorders lack an organic explanation, but that our assessment is inadequate in most clinical encounters. The primary goal of psychosomatic medicine is to correct this inadequacy by incorporation of its operational strategies into clinical practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000329997DOI Listing
January 2012
2 Reads

Psychological and cross-cultural aspects of infertility and human sexuality.

Adv Psychosom Med 2011 10;31:164-83. Epub 2011 Oct 10.

Oporto Faculty of Medicine, Porto, Portugal.

The influences of culture are present in different areas of human health, as is the case with reproductive behaviors. To have a child means to have made a responsible decision. If conception takes longer to happen, these patients require the help of doctors to stimulate the refractory body. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000328922DOI Listing
January 2012

Androgen deprivation treatment of sexual behavior.

Adv Psychosom Med 2011 10;31:149-63. Epub 2011 Oct 10.

University of Maryland Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship, Jessup, MD, USA.

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are underutilized in patients seeking diminution of problematic sexual drives. This chapter reviews the literature on surgical castration of sex offenders, anti-androgen use and the rationale for providing androgen deprivation therapy, rather than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or more conservative interventions, for patients with paraphilias and excessive sexual drive. Discussions of informed consent, side effects, contraindications and case examples are provided. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330196DOI Listing
January 2012
10 Reads

Autogynephilia: an underappreciated paraphilia.

Authors:
Anne A Lawrence

Adv Psychosom Med 2011 10;31:135-48. Epub 2011 Oct 10.

Department of Psychology, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alta., Canada.

Autogynephilia is defined as a male's propensity to be sexually aroused by the thought of himself as a female. It is the paraphilia that is theorized to underlie transvestism and some forms of male-to-female (MtF) transsexualism. Autogynephilia encompasses sexual arousal with cross-dressing and cross-gender expression that does not involve women's clothing per se. Read More

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https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/328921
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000328921DOI Listing
January 2012
52 Reads

The impact of sexual trauma on sexual desire and function.

Adv Psychosom Med 2011 10;31:105-20. Epub 2011 Oct 10.

American University, Washington, DC, USA.

The field of sexual trauma is one of the most controversial and value-laden in mental health. The three factors which most affect adult sexual desire and function are the type of sexual trauma, how the sexual incidents were dealt with at the time and, most important, whether the person views her/himself as a survivor or victim. The assessment and treatment program described focuses on couple sex therapy with a special focus on processing the sexual trauma, honoring the person's veto and being 'partners in healing'. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000328919DOI Listing
January 2012
1 Read

Management of female sexual pain disorders.

Adv Psychosom Med 2011 10;31:83-104. Epub 2011 Oct 10.

Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont., Canada.

Our understanding of the sexual pain disorders vaginismus and dyspareunia has been fundamentally altered over the past two decades due to increased attention and empirically sound research in this domain. This increased knowledge base has included a shift from a dualistic view of the etiology of painful and/or difficult vaginal penetration being due to either psychological or physiological causes, to a multifactorial perspective. The present chapter reviews current classification and prevalence rates, including ongoing definitional debates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000328810DOI Listing
January 2012
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The impact of cancer on sexual function.

Authors:
Mary K Morreale

Adv Psychosom Med 2011 10;31:72-82. Epub 2011 Oct 10.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA.

Almost any diagnosis of cancer, but particularly those primarily affecting areas related to sexual function, can lead to sexual impairment. Multiple phases of sexuality are impacted, and various dysfunctions result. Both biological and psychosocial mechanisms are involved in sexual difficulties after cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000328809DOI Listing
January 2012

Developments and trends in sex therapy.

Adv Psychosom Med 2011 10;31:57-71. Epub 2011 Oct 10.

Department of Psychology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA.

Recent developments and trends in sex therapy are reviewed and assessed. Major trends identified are: (1) multidisciplinarity in the treatment of sexual problems, whereby psychological interventions are combined with medical and other types of treatment (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000328808DOI Listing
January 2012
38 Reads

Sexual desire and arousal disorders in women.

Adv Psychosom Med 2011 10;31:16-34. Epub 2011 Oct 10.

Department of Sexology and Psychosomatic Obstetrics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

According to incentive motivation theory, sexual desire is the result of the interplay between a sensitive sexual response system and stimuli that activate the system. From this notion it follows that sexual desire is not a cause but a consequence of sexual arousal. The effects of hormones, somatic disease and medication on sexual arousability are discussed, as well as the influence of psychological factors - such as stimulus meaning, mood and cognition - and relational context on female sexual desire and arousal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000328806DOI Listing
January 2012
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Update on diagnoses of sexual dysfunctions: controversies surrounding the proposed revisions of existing diagnostic entities and proposed new diagnoses.

Adv Psychosom Med 2011 10;31:1-15. Epub 2011 Oct 10.

Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA.

The diagnosis of sexual dysfunction(s) or disorder(s) is paramount to the development of the field of sexual medicine. Historically, the diagnoses of these disorders have been considered reliable. The validity of diagnoses of sexual disorders (and the rest of our classification systems) has recently been questioned, especially from the point of clinical utility and homogeneity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000330670DOI Listing
January 2012
4 Reads

Ketamine in pain management.

Adv Psychosom Med 2011 19;30:139-61. Epub 2011 Apr 19.

Pain Management Division, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21029, USA.

Ketamine is an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist that has been in clinical use in the USA for over 30 years. Its ability to provide profound analgesia and amnesia while maintaining spontaneous respiration makes it an ideal medication for procedure-related pain and trauma. In the chronic pain arena, its use continues to evolve. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000324071DOI Listing
July 2011
11 Reads

Cannabinoids for pain management.

Adv Psychosom Med 2011 19;30:125-38. Epub 2011 Apr 19.

Pain Management Division, Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 21029, USA.

Cannabinoids have been used for thousands of years to provide relief from suffering, but only recently have they been critically evaluated in clinical trials. This review provides an in-depth examination of the evidence supporting cannabinoids in various pain states, along with an overview of potential adverse effects. In summary, there is strong evidence for a moderate analgesic effect in peripheral neuropathic and central pain conditions, and conflicting evidence for their use in nociceptive pain. Read More

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https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/324070
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000324070DOI Listing
July 2011
2 Reads